There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

75 of 77 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2011
To complement the Kumquat tree that I bought my husband for his birthday, I also bought the book Growing Tasty Tropical Plants in Any Home, Anywhere by Laurelynn G. Martin and Byron E. Martin. True to form, however, I ended up reading the book and just giving him the highlights. The book itself is by Storey Publishing - a name I tend to trust - and is 160 pgs. It is a quick read that I finished cover-to-cover in just a few hours and is broken down into five parts plus an introduction, glossary and resource guide.

Introduction: Enjoying an Indoor Edible Oasis

Part 1: Citrus Fruits

Australian Finger Lime
Calamondin Orange
Citron
Citrumelo
Grapefruit
Kumquat
Lemon
Lime
Myrtle-Leaf Orange
Orange
Sunquat
Sweet Lemon
Tahitian Orange
Tangerine
Temple Orange

Part 2: The Rest of the Tropical Fruit Basket

Acerola
Australian Beach Cherry
Avocado
Banana
Dragon Fruit
Dwarf Pomegranate
Fig
Guava
June Plum
Miracle Berry
Naranjilla
Noni
Olive
Orangeberry
Papaya
Passion Fruit
Peanut Butter Fruit
Pineapple
Pineapple GuavaRose Apple
Sapodilla
Star Fruit
Tree Tomato

Part 3: Coffee, Tea and Chocolate

Chocolate
Coffee
Tea
Yerba Mate

Part 4: Sugar and Spices

Black Pepper
Cinnamon
Sugarcane
Vanilla

Part 5: Plant Care

Getting Started from the Bottom Up
Maintaining Your Plants
Propagation
Pests and Diseases
Troubleshooting Guide

Each entry contains multiple color drawings and photographs on glossy 9 1/2 X 9 1/2 paper. The entries are very uniform in structure making it simple to find whatever information I need quickly and easily. Each plant sports a two-page spread where you will find the following:

Basic introductory information
Varieties appropriate for containers
Plant Particulars such as size and form, bloom season, fruiting season, family and origin.
Growing requirements such as light, soil, minimum indoor temperature and outdoor hardiness zone.
Fertilizing and pruning information.
and
Potential problems related to pests, foliar diseases and root diseases
Many fruits also include recipes for use.

As an inspiration, I really enjoyed this book. I discovered a citrus plant that will actually grow outdoors in my Zone 7 yard and found many others that I would love to try my hand at growing in containers. The layout is perfect for perusing and the information is basic enough that I am able to quickly determine which plants would be worth my time and effort to try. I particularly loved the pictures and the color drawings of how each plant would look in the home. I wish, however, that they had included size-comparison diagrams for each plant. Yes, I can see that the plant will go in a pot - that is what each of the color drawings looks like. However, what I would have preferred to see would have actually been pictures of the scale of the mature plant in relation to the rest of my home.

While there was a lot I enjoyed about this book, I really don't think the authors quite deliver what the title promises. The truth is that many of these plants need far more than a sunny window, water and fertilizer, which is what the authors imply. Many, in fact, require consistently high heat and light or a lot of space before they will even consider fruiting. I expected much more in the way of personal growing experiences as well as, at least a rudimentary introduction to artificially heating and lighting tropical plants indoors if one so chooses. I was also a bit disappointed that there was no "further reading" section. Because this is very much an inspirational book that gives only the bare minimum of care instructions, I would have at least expected a list of resources where I could find more detailed information.

Pros

Eye candy
Great inspiration
Basic information is neat and well organized in order to find information quickly and easily
The authors advocate a strictly organic approach to disease and pest infestations.
Photos show both pictures of the fruit but also includes color drawings of how the plant would look in your home.

Cons

No information whatsoever on artificial heating and lighting
Very little in the way of anecdotal information
No "further reading" section
No size comparison between individual plants and the average living room setting

Originally posted on my blog: [...]
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
I expected to get a book full of great tips to help you grow tasty tropical plants in any home any where. Instead I got a book that is more of a history lesson than a practical guide to... well anything.

I am disappointed with this book. There is little valuable information for the person who actually wants to grow tasty and tropical plants.

Spend your money on seeds.

***If you have a first generation Kindle then skip this book completely(do that anyway) the pages are chock full of pictures(with color?) and the formatting is deplorable.***
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on October 1, 2012
I don't have a green thumb. At all. I need all the help I can get to grow stuff.

This book is somewhat helpful in letting me grow food-bearing tropical plants. At this point I have a roughly 50% survival rate- which for me is pretty good. *shame*

The book has helped some, but not as much as I'd hoped it would; still, it's raised my survival rate to 50% from maybe 25%, so that's a huge improvement.

It's definitely inspirational- I want to get more tropical plants-= and try to help them survive!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 21, 2012
I first stumbled across this at the library. I read through it the day we brought it home, and knew I wanted my own copy. A week later, we found it at the used book store. I figured I was meant to buy it. This book provides a fun overview of several warm-weather-loving plants, the basics of successfully growing them indoors (which is good for a Minnesota gardener), and provides recipes for using some of the fruits. When I was a kid, my mother grew lemons, limes, and oranges inside in containers, and one of the doctors I worked for a few years ago grew bananas on a small tree in his office. I've grown pineapples, avocados, and orchids (but not the variety that produces vanilla beans). Some of the other plants listed in this book are ones I would not have thought of growing in a container, but will certainly be seeking out now (like sugarcane). I also now know how best to grow my own vanilla beans, and know where in my house will provide the best conditions (which was all that was stopping me before).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon March 13, 2011
How would you like to have a house filled with mini tropical trees and plants? I love that idea, it offers so many benefits, from home grown produce to beautiful plants to accent your decor and freshen your air. Understanding what the book offers is not so difficult, since in large, colorful text, the cover of the book gives it's full title: Growing Tasty Tropical Plants* (like lemons, limes, citrons, grapefruit, kumquats, sunquats, tahitian oranges, barbados ... tea, black pepper, cinnamon, vanilla, and more...) *in any home, anywhere. Inside the book are dozens of exotic plants, flowers, fruits, and other delectable, beautiful and wonderfully exotic plants that normally grow in exotic climes. As it turns out, any sunny window in your home probably qualifies as an "exotic clime," and the idea of coming home to discover the lovely aroma of some exotic tropical flowering fruit seems a little like heaven on earth.

Growing Tasty Tropical Plants includes lovely drawings of each kind of plant, along with many photos and a dynamic layout that clearly lays out pros, cons, intriguing facts, growing conditions, care and potential problems of each plant.

And that is what excited my children (and me) so much about Storey Publishing's new book. It appears soon that our sunroom will soon be the new home of a Miracle Berry, which apparently "tricks your taste buds so that everything eaten after the berry tasts sweet, even sour lemons or limes. Be forewarned though" the book thoughtfully continues, "eating too much sour fruit, even if it tastes sweet at the time, may leave your belly feeling somewhat sour afterward."

This kind of practical and knowledgeable advice that Laurelynn and Byron Martin offer really distinguishes the book throughout each entry, and in the books uniquely helpful plant care guide. The book includes chapters on "Enjoying an Indoor Edible Oasis," "Citrus Fruits," "The Rest of the Tropical Fruit Basket," "Coffee, Tea, and Chocolate," and "Sugar and Spices," along with a helpful glossary for us not-green-thumbs-types.

If you've ever thought that it would be wonderful to be able to pick fresh lemons, or limes, or tangerines, or avocados -- or find the idea of having your own tea, or guavas, or truly exotic plants like "peanut butter fruit" seems fun to you -- then Growing Tasty Tropical Plants is a book your entire family will truly enjoy.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 4, 2011
This book is great. It is well-designed, has great photos of the plants, and easy to understand cultivation info. It has advice on how to raise the plants indoors or outdoors and tells what temperatures indoors or what zone the plants can tolerate outdoors. Being a tropical book, expect most plants need zone 8-10. The book gives details on which plants produce most fruit, which ones need hand-pollination, what sun conditions they can tolerate, etc. If you're a rare plants junkie, get it!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 15, 2012
I wanted to dabble in some exotic plants and I bought this book along with some seeds and seedlings of a few tropical plants in this book. The color pictures, descriptions, care, and just overall information was very well written and organized...but short and sweet at the same time. It makes me want to order even more plants.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2011
Have yet to read the book cover to cover, but what I have gives general information per tropical plant type. Good for a novice gardener, but I would not recommend for people looking for in depth information per plant type.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 2015
I was really looking forward to this book as I love growing lemons and other tropical plants but sadly this book contained no more information than typically seen on the tag or in a catalogue.
I have seen more complete information online for free. Example: likes full sun or protect roots from getting waterlogged. Very vague and basic. No specific fertilizer recommendations either. I would not rebuy and feel the book is highly overpriced for something easily read in less than an hour with no true information. Nice photos but I wasn't interested in photos. I wanted growing information. Surprised by the high reviews as they are seeing something I didn't.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2011
Found this to be some basic information, but missed information on many fruits I was looking to learn about like jaboticaba, jakfruit, muntingia (strawberry tree), and others. Medium useful reference.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Growing Citrus: The Essential Gardener's Guide
Growing Citrus: The Essential Gardener's Guide by Martin Page (Hardcover - December 17, 2008)


All About Citrus and Subtropical Fruits
All About Citrus and Subtropical Fruits by Paul Moore (Paperback - February 19, 2008)
$11.61
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.