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Growing Up Brady: I Was a Teenage Greg, Special Collector's Edition Paperback – March 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Good Guy Entertainment; 3 edition (March 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0967378508
  • ISBN-13: 978-0967378503
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #184,510 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A must-read for anyone who grew up with TV's favorite family!" -- Variety

"Barry thumps! Johnny rocks, and I'm down with the bunch!" -- Coolio

"Packed with juicy tidbits of backstage battles, rivalry and teen make-out sessions." -- USA Today

"Was I really that difficult?" -- Robert Reed

About the Author

Barry Williams was fourteen, and already a veteran actor, when he landed the role of Greg Brady. Since the show ended, he has used his diverse talents as an entertainer and singer to head a successful business in corporate and institutional events, as well as starring and guesting in numerous TV shows and in musical theater on Broadway and across the country. Barry recently moved from Southern California to New York City to live with his new wife, Eila Mary Matt, an investment banker.

Chris Kreski is the head writer of The Martin Short Show, and has written for The Daily Show, as well as many other cable comedy shows. His other books include Star Trek Memories, Star Trek Movie Memories and Get a Life, all with William Shatner.


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Customer Reviews

It's a very entertaining book and very easy and fun to read.
Barry
The first time I read this book, it was the first edition and did not have the extra chapters, and this one does, so I really liked that.
Tylerpink
If you are a Brady fan, you will enjoy this book, i highly recommend to all Brady fans out there!
Jacquelyn Bean

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Echo VINE VOICE on November 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
I never thought I'd ever say this about anything "Brady", but this is a very multilayered book. Barry Williams is quite the storyteller, and Chris Kreski packaged "Growing Up Brady" very nicely. It remains the standard TV autobiography for the Gen X voyeur who wants to know the details of on-set romances, Hawaii wipeouts, guest star memories, etc. What I really enjoy about "Growing Up Brady" is the easy, affable way that Barry Williams publicly comes to terms with his Brady past. One can only imagine the inane questions, the ignorant comments, and the stares this man has had to endure. And, of course, no matter how good or bad his talents are, there will always be a Brady subtext to anything he does.
Despite the superficial Hollywood tell-all there is a sad undercurrent to Williams' book. Robert Reed's unhappiness as Mike Brady was a surprise to me, although it wasn't unpredicatable. While his mannerisms and on-set antics seem trivial, the man seemed genuinely bothered by how insignificant he perceived his role to be. Watch anything non-Brady from the 1970s and you'll see Reed try to act as different from Mike as he can manage, to the point of extreme hamminess (catch "Pray For The Wildcats", co-starring the king of ham himself, William Shatner). Reed's limits were imposed by himself, and I find it very sad that despite trying very hard, he never seemed to come to terms with his most notable role. Reed's documented generosity and warmth towards his castmates seems to far outweigh any negative insight into his character.
Almost as sad is the inevitable comparison of the actors' post-Brady lives with their former roles. Williams alludes to this many times in the book...
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 12, 1998
Format: Paperback
There are many books about "The Brady Bunch," but I find all of them to be sorely lacking except for Barry Williams' memoir. His book offers insight and behind-the-scenes material that the other "Brady" authors could have provided but didn't. They would have had to have worked exceptionally hard and get meaningful interviews with the cast and crew of the show. They would have had to write their books with wit and flair. Instead, they were content simply to build glorified episode guides and trot out all sorts of meaningless trivia. That's why this book stands out. Barry Williams told a story that was rich with colors and personality. He showed how a lightweight sitcom could make such a huge impact on our pop culture. He made me laugh by showing the weird ways in which "Bradymania" affected his life. I never thought he was a particularly good actor on "The Brady Bunch." But he makes a mighty fine author.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Robin Orlowski on May 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Authored by Barry Williams, (aka Greg Brady) this volume differs from fan-books of retro tv shows in that it is neither a hyper-romanticized trip down memory lane, nor bitter attacking screed from an individual wishing the spotlight back on themselves.
In refreshingly honest prose, Williams recalls the thrill of growing up in the early 1970's (including celebrity perks). The balanced perspective on America's most famous sitcom on seccond marriages and mixed families draws in readers who liked the show, but were never tremendous fans. Openly candid, Williams shares hillarious backstage hijinks that attempt to explain why these former child stars have managed to avoid the negative publicity that caught up with so many of their contemporaries.
True, the long-standing animosity between Robert Reed and Sherwood Schwartz is included, but this does not detract from the genuinely caring sentiment that cast members feel towards one another on and off cammera. The exact family composition may have been the work of a hollywood scriptwriter and casting director, but hollywood personnel could not have required these people to develop the strong personal bonds with eachother that only strengthened over time.
In keeping with the desire for a book transcending the typical low expectations for former Child Star memoirs, a suprisingly small lack of space is devoted to an apparent fling with co-stars Maureen McCormick and Florence Henderson. Certainly mentioned, both incidents are not excessively doted on by the author.
The overall focus of the text seems to be on how a shared sense of cooperation and commuinity among the cast helped a tv show about step-families become a favirote in the American pop psyche at a time when "stepfamily" still conotated various fairy-tale horror stories.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Barry on April 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
If, like me, you are a Bradyphile, then you were probably shocked to read some of Mr. Williams' tales in this wonderful book. By now, these juicy secrets are common knowledge, but coming upon them for the first time was shocking. If you are not a fan of the show that ran from 1969 to 1974, this might not be for you. But you'd be surprised how many people who aren't big fans have read it and really liked it. It's a very entertaining book and very easy and fun to read. Mr. Williams writes with a great outlook on his Brady past. He doesn't take anything the least bit seriously here. Nor should he. The book begins with Barry's earlier beginnings. It's not page turning stuff folks, but it is interesting to read all of the old shows he guest starred on. Nothing gets good until we enter Bradyland. What fun it is. The most interesting stuff in this book to read are all of the fights and confrontations between Robert Reed(Mr. Brady), and the show's creator/producer/writer Sherwood Schwartz. It was constant, and it was bloody. It's real interesting to read how everyone's favorite dad acted behind the scenes. The stuff here is priceless. But, even if Mr. Reed comes off rather crass, you have to remember that he was just trying to help the show. Then again, if he really hated it, why did he always return for the reunions?. The hot stuff comes in the form of the Greg/Marcia romance. The two actors, Williams and Maureen McCormack, did get hot and heavy. Cindy and Bobby got serious, as did Jan and Peter too. Pretty soon, it would've been Carol and Tiger. The end of the book has the usual episode guide to all of the episodes. Some of them also have little sections to certain episodes with particular information on that episode.Read more ›
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