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Growing Up Jim Crow: How Black And White Southern Children Learned Race Paperback – May 15, 2006

5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807856840 ISBN-10: 0807856843 Edition: 1st

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Explores how black and white southern children developed a sense of racial identity and learned to carry out their expected roles in southern society.--Southwestern Historical Society

Review

[An] important, gracefully written, highly original study.--Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

|Provides readers . . . with a guide for rooting out the vestiges of Jim Crow that persist today.--Southern Cultures

|Sheds new light on questions of change and continuity in the South.--Carolina Country

|Fascinating. . . . Ritterhouse does an excellent job. . . . allows the reader to learn about how white privilege continued to enter in the consciousness of the people and challenges the reader to seek ways to develop a more perfect union.--Historian

|A fascinating collection. . . . Ritterhouse does an excellent job reporting on the moments in the lives of both black and white Southerners.--Historian

|This imaginatively researched, clearly argued, and eloquently written book expands our definition of 'etiquette' to include the basic patterns of thought and behavior that underlay race relations in the South for more than a century. The result is a fascinating look at the sometimes surprising assumptions learned by black and white children growing up in the American South after the Civil War.--James Marten, Marquette University

|Growing Up Jim Crow is an original and compelling contribution to the histories of racism and its generations. Ritterhouse's provocative insights and impressive research focus a critical look at the youngest bodies who bear the complex marks of U.S. race and racism. Absolutely a fascinating read, and without question, a necessary book.--Karla FC Holloway, author of Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics, and the Color of Our Character

|[An] engaging book . . . . Growing Up Jim Crow gives readers much to reflect on, and this book should appeal to a wide range of readers.--North Carolina Historical Review

|[Growing Up Jim Crow: How Black and White Southern Children Learned Race] is a welcome historical account of race in the South and how it is socially constructed and learned.--Multicultural Review

|A substantial contribution to the burgeoning field of child identity development in the segregated US South.--African American Review

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (May 15, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807856843
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807856840
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #915,331 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JayefromJersey on April 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As African American I have been living with racism all my life and always wondered why is it like this in America!..this book has answered those questions for me and more! And now I understand the culture of the land that I live in...it answers all the questions that no one will honestly tell you about our country...a must read for every citizen in United States and abroad...
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By H. Fox on July 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
While the title and cover of this book suggest that there will be more personal recollections, diaries, interviews, and such than actually appear, I still found this book full of fascinating insights into the arrogance and cruelty of Southern race relations. It left me with some disturbing thoughts and questions as well. The propensity for high status individuals to lord it over those they consider beneath them, and to define these human beings as "lower" not by merit or effort but by color and class is not unique to the US past. The way Americans have treated people around the world, both in our military adventures and our humanitarian efforts are strikingly similar to the way whites treated blacks in the old South, less blatantly, perhaps, but with similar assumptions and repercussions. This particularly struck me when I read about the impoverished black father asking his white boss for a loan to cover the cost of an incubator for his premature infant. The white man gives the usual excuses -- no money at this time, etc. -- and later remarks that he has never heard of a black child in an incubator. How similar is this to the attitude of the rich countries toward the most impoverished when it comes to access to the latest medical technology and treatment (as incubators were in the past)? Who has ever heard of a baby in rural Cambodia or Burundi, for example, having access to early detection of genetic diseases, or open-heart surgery? Too expensive, we say. And, well, not really necessary. Lots of children die in poor countries. Of course Americans aren't the only ones with these attitudes, but since we consider ourselves superior in compassion, human rights, and equality of opportunity, we might look at how well we meet our own high standards and our beliefs about ourselves.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Luke E. on December 31, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pretty good read. Jam packed with information, but could be packaged as more of a cohesive study. If you are writing a paper on the subject it will be very helpful.
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Format: Paperback
Great ! This would be excellent for a black history course.
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By Glenda lee- Lewis on September 1, 2014
Format: Paperback
loved it.
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Growing Up Jim Crow: How Black And White Southern Children Learned Race
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