Buy Used
$5.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by ToyBurg
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed. Readable copy. All pages complete and readable but expect worn edges, covers, and creases. There is no Amazon condition below acceptable.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Guardian of the Dawn Paperback – July 26, 2005


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.88 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Delta (July 26, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385338813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385338813
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,899,808 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Picking up where he left off in The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon, Zimler tracks the travails of a young Jewish manuscript illustrator who flees with his family from Portugal to India to escape the Portuguese Inquisition in the last decades of the 16th century. Tiago Zarco, whom his family calls Ti, is the precocious protagonist, and he and his family constantly face religious persecution, particularly when Ti's sister Sofia develops an ill-fated attraction for her cousin, a Moor nicknamed Wadi. Ti, meanwhile, has his own troubles, which revolve around his romance with Tejal, the beautiful Hindu girl he hopes to marry. Family betrayal eventually leads to the arrest of Ti's father for his involvement with the "secret Jews," a group targeted by the Catholic authorities. Ti ends up in prison as well, but, upon his "confession" and release, he embarks on a complex mission to avenge his father. The narrative and dialogue are occasionally melodramatic, but the historical authority in Zimler's prose is impressive, as is his surefooted plotting and formidable character writing. The riveting final chapters pick up the pace, a welcome change from the novel's overall slow burn. Still, Zimler's treatment of an obscure period of history makes for an exotic, colorful novel.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Zimler returns to the family of Berekiah Zarco, hero of the searing Last Kabbalist of Lisbon (1998), in his latest novel about the Portuguese Jews of the sixteenth century. The story picks up in the 1590s as Tiago Zarco, great-great grandchild of Berekiah, comes of age in Goa, India, where many Portuguese Jews have immigrated to escape forced conversion to Christianity. But the long arm of the Inquisition reaches even to colonial India, where resident Jews dodge the ruling Catholics and live together with the local Hindus. Zimler effectively juxtaposes another saga of horrifying religious persecution (Tiago narrates most of the novel from a prison cell) against a tender, multicultural love story that transcends the historical moment, touching readers with its similarity to contemporary tales of star-crossed lovers ("We were venturing forth from out of the mystery of ourselves"). The density of Zimler's prose may put off some, but his powerful evocation of a world not so very different from ours strikes a universal chord during yet another age of cultural and religious disharmony. Bill Ott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Richard Zimler was born in Roslyn Heights, a suburb of New York, in 1956. After earning a bachelor's degree in comparative religion from Duke University (1977) and a master's degree in journalism from Stanford University (1982), he worked for eight years as a journalist, mainly in the San Francisco Bay area. In 1990, he moved to Porto, Portugal, where he taught journalism for sixteen years, first at the College of Journalism and later at the University of Porto. Richard has published eight novels over the last 15 years. In chronological order, they are: The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon, Unholy Ghosts, The Angelic Darkness, Hunting Midnight, Guardian of the Dawn, The Search for Sana, The Seventh Gate and The Warsaw Anagrams. His novels have appeared on bestseller lists in 12 different countries, including the USA, Great Britain, Portugal, Brazil, Italy, and Australia. Richard has won numerous prizes for his work, including the Prix Alberto Benveniste in 2009, for Guardian of the Dawn (for Jewish-themed fiction), and the 1998 Herodotus Award, for The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon (Best First Historical Novel). His latest novel, The Warsaw Anagrams, was chosen as 2010 Book of the Year in Portugal, by both the country's main literary monthly (LER) and high school teachers and students. Hunting Midnight, The Search for Sana and The Seventh Gate have all been nominated for the International IMPAC Literary Award, the richest prize in the English-speaking world. He was also granted a 1994 U.S. National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Fiction. The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon, Hunting Midnight, Guardian of the Dawn and The Seventh Gate form the "Sephardic Cycle," a group of inter-connected - but fully independent - novels about different branches and generations of a Portuguese Jewish family. in 2010, a short film he based on one of his short stories won the Best Drama award at the New York Downtown Short Film Festival. It is entitled The Slow Mirror. Richard also writes reviews for the L.A. Times. When he's not writing, he enjoys gardening at his weekend house in the north of Portugal.

Customer Reviews

This book is not a light, feel-good kind of book.
SerenaBlackCat
What is pretty certain is that they did not call it a "dreidl" since this is a Yiddish word with its origin in German.
Lilly
I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys historical fiction.
Rebecca Mugridge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Carlos on September 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
The San Francisco Chronicle recently gave this novel a rave review, telling readers that they "couldn't find a more timely book for their summer reading" because of how it explores the evils of fundamentalism in an "eloquent and moving" way. I couldn't agree more. This brilliant novel has been a huge bestseller in Portugal, where I live.
"Guardian of the Dawn" brings readers to 16th-century Goa, the glorious capital of the spice trade, but also a city terrorized by the Portuguese Inquisition. I was particularly drawn to Tiago, the young Jewish narrator of the book, who eventually ends up a prisoner of the Inquisition, like his father. Tiago is complex and conflicted, and it is fascinating to follow his evolution over the course of the novel. Through him, this book asks the difficult question: how far can one bend one's own moral code to fight intolerance and evil? I also loved two of the minor characters, both of whom are amazing creations: Nupi, the warm-hearted and charismatic Hindu cook who works for Tiago's family; and Phanishwar, the Jain snake-dancer who shares Tiago's prison cell. For attentive readers, there is a bonus here: Zimler re-tells the story of Othello from before the action of Shakespeare's play. In other words, he brings Iago and Othello back to their childhoods (though they are called Tiago and Wadi in this novel), and shows us what might have gone wrong between them. The last quarter of the novel runs parallel to the action of Shakespeare's play and becomes a tragic page-turner. I read the last 150 pages of the book in one sitting, completely enthralled by the story and the superb writing. "Guardian of the Dawn" is a very ambitious and exciting novel. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in literary fiction, Indian history or Jewish history. I would also highly recommend Zimler's "The Search for Sana"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Carlos on September 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
The San Francisco Chronicle recently gave this novel a rave review, telling readers that they "couldn't find a more timely book for their summer reading" because of how it explores the evils of fundamentalism in an "eloquent and moving" way. I couldn't agree more. This brilliant novel has been a huge bestseller in Portugal, where I live.

"Guardian of the Dawn" brings readers to 16th-century Goa, the glorious capital of the spice trade, but also a city terrorized by the Portuguese Inquisition. I was particularly drawn to Tiago, the young Jewish narrator of the book, who eventually ends up a prisoner of the Inquisition, like his father. Tiago is complex and conflicted, and it is fascinating to follow his evolution over the course of the novel. Through him, this book asks the difficult question: how far can one bend one's own moral code to fight intolerance and evil? I also loved two of the minor characters, both of whom are amazing creations: Nupi, the warm-hearted and charismatic Hindu cook who works for Tiago's family; and Phanishwar, the Jain snake-dancer who shares Tiago's prison cell. For attentive readers, there is a bonus here: Zimler re-tells the story of Othello from before the action of Shakespeare's play. In other words, he brings Iago and Othello back to their childhoods (though they are called Tiago and Wadi in this novel), and shows us what might have gone wrong between them. The last quarter of the novel runs parallel to the action of Shakespeare's play and becomes a tragic page-turner. I read the last 150 pages of the book in one sitting, completely enthralled by the story and the superb writing. "Guardian of the Dawn" is a very ambitious and exciting novel. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in literary fiction, Indian history or Jewish history. I would also highly recommend Zimler's "The Search for Sana"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By SerenaBlackCat on January 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is not a light, feel-good kind of book. The story is very heavy and dark, relating the cruelty, suspicion and betrayal of the Inquisition and how it tore friends and families apart.

Half of the book is narrated in a split-time period, going from the present where Tiago is in jail, to the past, where he had a childhood with a loving, but somewhat troubled, family, leading up to the events that put him in jail and continuing in the present.

His childhood describes his relationship with his father, as well as his sister, his uncle, his deceitful-yet-charming cousin, and his vain, prissy aunt. His father is surprisingly tolerant of a lot of things, including his relationship with a Hindu, and in saying that the many gods in Hinduism are facets of the one god in Judiasm, his views are extremely modern. I don't know if such a thought ever occurred to people back then, but it may have in this diverse culture. This book brought up some subjects (such as Tiago having a crush on his cousin) that were a surprise to me.

He sees his father arrested and has to make a very difficult choice in following his father's wishes. He also ends up in jail and you see the misery of the conditions in prison as well as the impossibility of escaping from the Inquisition. One of the things that struck me the most was his cellmate Phanishwar, a Jain who hardly knew anything of Christianity. He was tricked into coming to Goa and he didn't even know what he was being persecuted for, nor did anyone explain to him. To me, that was the saddest part of the book.

There are scenes of Tiago meeting with an Inquisitor, and you see how difficult it is to give the right answers and manage to break free.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?