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Guardians of the Lost (Sovereign Stone Trilogy, Book 2) Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Series: Sovereign Stone Trilogy (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager; 1st edition (November 13, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061051799
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061051791
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.5 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #458,573 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bestsellers Weis and Hickman (Dragonlance series, etc.) deliver a solid tale peopled by familiar figures (some of whom are Not What They Seem) in the second volume of their latest fantasy trilogy. Two hundred years after the action in Well of Darkness, the world of Loerem (conceived by fantasy artist Larry Elmore, who provides the stunning jacket art work) is plunged into war. Old hatreds and new combine with the struggle to recover all the pieces of the Sovereign Stone to uproot the characters, sending them running across lands turned hostile. While much of the work fits the classic fantasy quest tradition, the authors do manage to impart some subtle differences, such as basing cultural traits and the magic used by each race (human, elf, dwarf, ork) upon an unusual associated element. (Orks are the water race and rule the seas, while the fire-using dwarves are master horse riders.) Dagnarus, Lord of the Void, is also not the quintessential outsider that most evil overlords tend to be. Instead, he's a Mordred figure, struggling to claim what he believes is his inheritance. In places the narrative turns expository, in order to aid readers wishing to role-play in the setting. Elsewhere, the collaboration reveals its seams, as when the same object is repeatedly given two names (blood knife/bone knife) or when a long-separated elven wife and husband immediately separate after embracing, "for elves consider public displays of affection to be boorish and intrusive." The target audience, college-age readers and their teenage kin, should be well satisfied. (Nov. 20)Forecast: As with the authors' Dragonlance books, the associated role-playing game is sure to swell sales for the novel and vice versa.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

When Sir Gustav recovers a portion of the long-lost Sovereign Stone, he hopes that its reunion with its companion stones will bring humans, elves, dwarves, and orken together to battle the forces of the Void. A group of unlikely individuals, including a young barbarian and his traveling companion, one of the diminutive race of pecwae, undertakes the quest to bring the magical treasure to its rightful place as vicious monsters pursue them across the landscape. In this sequel to Well of Darkness, best-selling fantasy authors Weis and Hickman again demonstrate their uncanny ability to create meticulously detailed imaginary worlds peopled with complex and vital characters. For most fantasy collections.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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I read roughly a book per week.
Pdxnative83
This book has a good story line and moves along quickly to an exciting conclusion.
woodworkergreg
Also, the first book tended to portray Good as stupid and Evil as clever.
David A. Lessnau

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Preston Hunt on June 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Guardians of the Lost keeps up the pace introduced in the first book of the trilogy. Freed from having to build a new world from scratch for the reader, the authors can devote their pages more to new plot and the resulting story flows much better. The book is a very quick read, and at times I almost feel guilty for sucking down this fantasy mind candy, but there is enough creativity in there to keep things honorable. My only complaint is that for a book that purports that good and evil exist in balanced harmony, the bad guys sure seem a lot more powerful than the good guys. As one example, consider the fact that the Vrykrl can communicate with each other over any distance by using their blood knives, whereas the Dominion Lords have no comparable skill. This small complaint is not enough to keep me from yearning for the publication of the third book, however!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on November 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
On Loerem, Gustav the knight feels the danger as he enters the magic field of a burial mound. There he sees the dying Dominion Lord surrounded by "guardians". The bakh-Lord has the Sovereign Stone, a magical stone everyone wants to possess, but it was lost for a couple of centuries. Gustav manages to work his way past each guardian until he reaches the Dominion Lord. Gustav takes the magical artifact, but leaves behind a non-magical ring that contains the love he shares with his beloved.

Gustav is knocked unconscious in battle and consequently his segment of the Sovereign Stone has resurfaced. The news leads to war among the varying races. Every person in power or wannabees whether they are magical or royal want to gain possession of the powerful artifact or at least the part that Gustav found. Alliances are broken and old hatreds and bias enflame the world with little hope for peace.

GUARDIANS OF THE LOST, volume two of the Sovereign Stone trilogy, is an exciting epic fantasy adventure. The story line is fast paced and the charcaters fully developed since the readers can easily delineate the different species due to reasonable distinct traits. Fans of role-playing games will especially relish this novel that mirrors the game it comes from, but other readers might object to sidebars that embellish playing rather than perusing. Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman have written an engaging tale that the role-playing crowd will find most enlightening.

Harriet Klausner
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jason S Robinson on August 25, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The first book in this series was very well done and in this second book, the series gets even better. The danger to the realm is much more dire than in the first book as Dagnarus now has an army plus numerous Vykrls at his command. But in typical fantasy tradition there are always heroes to rise to the challenge and defend their land. The characters in this book are very well written and a few even infuse the book with a little humour, something lacking in the first book.

All in all this is a really good book and I can't wait to read the third and final book in this series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By choiceweb0pen0 VINE VOICE on December 27, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Guardians of the Lost is a large improvement over its predecessor, Well of Souls. Weis and Hickman move away from large chunks of detailed lectures about their new world and let the story take precedence, like its supposed to anyway. Unfortunately, they fall back to their old ways. Honestly, if I want to be told directly why one race hates another race or why one race wears pink instead of blue, I'll go to the gaming world guidebook. In a novel, just show me, I'll figure it out. With that out of the way, the second improvement is focusing away from the spoiled, obnoxious, I'm a bad guy because I wear black armor and you don't, Dagnarus , to the other side with actually capable heroes, something the first novel truly lacked. Often in a trilogy, the plot just creeps along, just enough to set you up for the third concluding novel. Guardians of the Lost differs here, particularly with an ending to make you wait impatiently for the next novel to come out in a year. The tide shifts back from the first novel, suggesting a good final ending, but not necessarily. I think they have written better novels than this one, but `Guardians of the Lost' is a book in the right direction.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By MMO on August 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Although Guardians of the Lost jumps 200 years after where Well of Darkness ends, it continues the story of the fate of the Sovereign Stone and Dagnarus' (Lord of the Void) designs for gaining the stones' power and taking over the world. There are several plot threads - Dominion Lord Gustav who entrusts the Trevenici youth Bessan, pecwae Bashae and Grandmother with his mission; the unhorsed Dwarf with Trevenici woman Raven journeying to dragon mountain; a Trevenici chief trying to save his village from a void curse as he runs afoul of Dagnarus' army; an elven Dominion Lord and her wizard husband, and a rogue "almost Dominion Lord." Although this second book doesn't have the complexity and character depth of the first, the pace is fast and doesn't become bogged down. The ending is nicely unresolved, leaving the reading hanging and wanting more. A fun and fast read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AliGhaemi on April 17, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Guardians Of The Lost, the second tome in the Sovereign Stone trilogy, follows its predecessor Well Of Darkness with more characters, more races, more action and even more oddity. The setting is 200 years following the fall of Old Vinnengael in the world called Loerem. The races distrust each other and one another while a noble few seek to reunify the sovereign stones and rid the world of evil and woe. The servant of void Dagnarus, still alive and bent on domination, has increased his army of nefarious Vrykyl and moreover used magical portals to gain indefatigable foot soldiers.

For most of the book Guardians Of The Lost bears a close resemblance to Tolkien's Lord Of The Rings. Two sets of companions traverse the land carrying precious (in this case) stones. They flee and approach dark forces bent on capturing them and possession of the prized magical stones. The choice of the companions again defies logic at first, although the gods trust in them is ultimately justified. As battles, betrayals and bewilderment ensues Dagnarus is thwarted in his ultimate dream, but so are the noble companions and their custodians. The book ends mid-saga as danger looms and confusion reigns on all sides.

The fantasy is rich and the characters motley, but one can only wonder at the semblance of the story to the well-known classic of the genre.
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