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Guess What Came to Dinner?: Parasites and Your Health
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60 of 61 people found the following review helpful
Ann Louise Gittleman is doing all she can to raise awareness of the danger of parasites in our lives; it is, she argues, a silent epidemic. We've all heard of outbreaks of E. coli and the like, but such disturbing stories quickly fade away from the public consciousness. Most people don't want to think about all the really nasty things that might be oozing their way throughout their bodies. Gittleman clearly makes the case, however, that parasites are a growing danger, and the fact that many medical professionals aren't especially knowledgeable about the subject only exacerbates the problem. Few medical students take a single course on parasitology, she says, because such courses are usually found under tropical diseases - and we in the United States still tend to think that parasites only affect the lives of those in impoverished and/or tropical nations. Gittleman's objective in writing this book (now available in this revised version) is to educate everyone, layman and medical professional alike, on the extent of the parasite threat. By doing so, she is able to offer advice and guidance on protecting yourself from the myriad of invisible threats parasites pose.

First, Gittleman lays out a strong case for the greatly increased prevalence of parasites in today's America, pointing to a number of factors such as the great increase in international travel, the contamination of water supplies, the increased use of antibiotics, the ever-growing use of day-care centers (which one expert dubbed the open sewers of the 20th century), and the dramatic number of household pets interacting with men, women, and especially children. She then describes some of the symptoms of the different kinds of parasitic conditions. In many cases, she says, these symptoms closely mirror the symptoms of other diseases and usually go undiscovered - thus, you have patients continuing to suffer with afflictions while being treated for conditions they may not even have. Gittleman's guide to parasites provides summary details (albeit somewhat technical ones) about all of the varying types of parasites - fluke worms, tapeworms, assorted amoebae, and a number of dastardly little critters I had never heard of. She provides information designed to help you determine whether you might have a parasite yourself (relying significantly on lifestyle history), discusses the most modern testing methods out there, and discusses treatment options. If you exhibit symptoms that do not go away and have your physician somewhat baffled, she encourages you to consider the possibility of a parasite and discuss it with your doctor. I was amazed to learn that parasites can basically settle in all over your body, not just in your gastrointestinal tract.

The most important part of the book, though, has to do with prevention and protection. With parasites so prevalent in our daily lives, it is important to build up our resistance to them. Gittleman goes into detail about the problems inherent in water and food preparation (especially undercooking), the risks posed by even the most beloved of pets (the next time your four-legged best friend gives you some sugar, you could possibly end up swallowing egg-carrying fleas), and the health risks surrounding young children. As you might suspect, activities such as eating dirt and moving your hands back and forth between your backside and your mouth are not conducive to good, pesticide-free health (it's amazing that so many of us actually survive long enough to grow up given the general nastiness that defines babyhood and early childhood).

The book does get slightly technical from time to time, and Gittleman does engage in the art of redundancy occasionally, but this is certainly a valuable and effective book. It makes you think about a danger you have probably never contemplated before, explodes the myth that parasites only cause problems in Third World countries, and helps you take steps to better protect you and your loved ones from the pain and suffering parasites are more than capable on inflicting upon you.
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76 of 80 people found the following review helpful
on July 9, 2000
All I can say is God Bless Ann Louise Gittleman. If it were not for this book that I brought with me into my physician's office, I would have never discovered that I had a chronic case of giardia. My doctor was dismissing my symptoms for the longest time and finally when I found Ann Louise's books, I realized that a parasitic infection can be misdiagnosed as flu, IBS, or even gall bladder disease. Now that I have taken the prescribed medication and am using Ann Louise's suggested natural herbs from Uni Key as a follow up, I am a new person. This book should be Mandatory reading for every high school student, college student and health minded individual in America.
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114 of 126 people found the following review helpful
on March 11, 1999
This topic, affecting so many millions without their knowledge, and without treatment, certainly has to be one of the few unexplored areas in the public media. Most public media will not "touch" this news. The effects on health are myriad. Gittleman has acknowledged the problem with parasites, both large and gross, and small and microbial. Everytime one comes in from outdoors, digging in the soil, cleaning up after pets, pulling weeds, etc., one must wash doubly, and clean under and around fingernails. The thought of pets kept indoors, being let outside, then going back in and climbing on the furniture, the beds, walking on the countertops, eating from human family dishes, etc., makes my skin "crawl". We are living in a parasitic nightmare, similar to the most abject, filthy slums, here in our arrogant, smug, current style. The image of classy, high-toned people being kissed and licked by their pets, immediately after the pet just licked and kissed its street friends is amusing, isn't it? What do we see in nearly every prime-time TV ad? A pet, licking a child, or "kissing" an adult. Everytime one pets pets of any kind, or grooms them, or cleans up after them, it is safest to assume parasites are there, ready to infect the human. Organic food of every kind may be full of nematodes and other parasites, especially if it has been fertilized with barnyard manure of any age, composted or not. Wash your food, or soak it in mild detergent in water, or even put it in water with a single drop of chlorine, then rinse very thoroughly. Did you know that many herbal treatments for cancer are the same ones used to treat parasitic infection? And you all want to cut down those precious and useful black walnut trees? Gittleman and others, unpopular messengers in a public wholly ignorant about this problem, are doing us a tremendous service with their research and their well-founded advice and simple, effective treatments. The least we can do is read their books, take the cures, and find out their truths by feeling better, and enjoying good health. Parasitic infection could be the background cause of many, many human ills. THANK YOU, Ann Louis and Anne L.Gittleman!
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54 of 58 people found the following review helpful
on October 28, 1999
I thought Ann Louise Gittleman did a wonderfully thorough job of exposing parasites in terms of where they come from, who gets them, and what we can do about it to prevent them. Her dietary information was right on in light of the current concerns about sugar and processed foods plus the herbal and homeopathic remedies really work. I think the overly sensitive reviewer from San Franciso should get with the program - This book tells it like it is and specifically states that parasites know no boundary regardless of gender, race, or economic level.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 1999
I just loved this book...even though the topic is icky. Ann Louise Gittleman has done a marvelous public service by exposing this silent invader of hidden parasites which is affecting us all in many ways. I ordered the products in her book from Uni Key and you should have seen the creatures of the blue lagoon that came out. Bottom line I feel terrific after the Parasite Clease. This lady sure knows what she is talking about. Thank you, thank, thank you.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2013
The pros: The author makes it clear that parasites are a much bigger problem than many Americans think and that alone is a very important assertion. She also does a decent job of laying out the most common symptoms of various parasites, which most doctors are clueless about.

The cons: The author's recommendations for ridding the body of parasites are incomplete and, at times, inaccurate. The drugs she recommends in many cases are not actually the drugs that are most effective in treating specific parasites. For example, she lists Chloroquine as a top pharmaceutical remedy for both liver flukes and lung flukes, but that drug is extremely toxic and not all that effective. It is most commonly used to prevent malaria. The drugs more commonly used (and in talking with others who have treated/rid themselves of these parasites, more effective) are Triclabendazole, Egaten, Fasinex, Bithionol, Lorothidol and Bitin. True, some of these drugs (Egaten especially) are not available in the U.S., but then again, every expert I've read (including Gittleman) all say the sources of flukes are not in the U.S. either, so it makes sense that in countries where parasite treatment is more common (and more needed) certain treatments would be more likely to be available there. There are ways to get some of the drugs that aren't usually available in the U.S., but that's not the point here -- the point is that when I read research reports on studies conducted on eliminating various parasites, they don't match up with the recommendations given in this book. Nor does the experience of the group of people I've talked to from various places regarding elimination of parasites.

One other frustration was that the book still indicates that most parasites like flukes can be traced to some specific visit to a foreign country or an interaction with someone who spent time in a foreign country. With much of our produce being shipped in from overseas these days, I think it's fair to say that in many cases, you may never know exactly how you contracted certain parasites and rather than spend lots of time trying to figure out the source of ever leaf of lettuce you've ever eaten, I would recommend starting to follow some of the solid prevention tips she lists and, of course, ridding yourselves of any parasites you may have. Of course, you often will not receive a diagnosis of having specific parasites because they may not have been laying eggs the day you got tested, but that doesn't mean you don't have them. There are some common herbal parasite remedies (green walnut hull, wormwood and cloves, for example) that often will kill enough parasites for you to see evidence of them when you go to the bathroom. These herbs may not rid you of them, but at least you would have a better idea of whether you really did have something that needs treating and this method is much cheaper than having a $400 stool test that only checks for a limited number of species.

If this is a concern for you (and I suspect it should be a concern for many Americans), I would suggest reading some of the treatments discussed on Curezone. Most of the people on there are not experts, but they are also not usually selling anything -- they're just sharing their experiences and what worked for them. If nothing else, I think you'd learn a lot.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon March 21, 2006
This is a phenomenal and shocking book which everyone should read, especially and including doctors. Parasite related disorders (and there are many) in North America are skyrocketing, contends the author Ann Louise Gittleman, and has become a hidden epidemic and cause for much mis-diagnosis. Since 60% of U.S. households alone have either a dog or a cat, the chapter on pets titled 'Mans Best Friend' is worth your attention alone. You will never let your dog kiss you (lick your face) again! Of course, parasites can invade your body in a myriad of ways ignored by most people, whether you have a pet or not, and can live inside you for up to 30 years and cause many symptoms and discomfort, or worse. Ignore this book at your peril.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on July 30, 1998
After studying this subject for years we were thrilled to find this book. It is a concise presentation of the very real parasite problem in America. Congratulations to Ann Louise Gittleman, author, for this masterpiece and for putting it in layman's language. We often recommend it to audiences in our health seminars.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2007
This book is an absolute must read, especially for those plagued by Morgellons mites, dermatologists, doctors, school nurses and health care professionals. Although there is no mention about Morgellons, the insights gleaned from this book about parasites and their life cycles will help anyone with a bug problem. Pretty technical but she gets you through it with unforgettable stories. It will certainly motivate you to clean your home and bedding. 80% Clear & Getting There
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on June 23, 1998
I think the world needs to wake up to the reality of what's wrong with the foods we eat and the consequences we face, if we don't take heed to the recommendations that are in this great book. Is there a way I could contact the Author so that I can speak to her about the subject???
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