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Rich Dad's Guide to Becoming Rich...Without Cutting Up Your Credit Cards Paperback – December 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Rich Dad
  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Business Plus (December 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446697524
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446697521
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 6.4 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,107,404 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki founded an international financial education company and invented the board game Cashflow. Sharon Lechter is an accountant who now focuses her efforts on creating educational tools for anyone wishing to better their financial education.

From AudioFile

This installment of an enormously popular series delivers a hefty compendium of ideas, anecdotes, and money management policies that the author claims will change the fortunes of all who are disciplined enough to implement them. The affable Jim Ward guides listeners though the corridors of thrift, wise investment, and reinvestment, occasionally providing case histories and testimonials to validate and motivate. His delivery is sincere but never overbearing, perhaps reflective of the comfortable state of mind one reaches when rich. While some of the content boils down to common sense, the remainder offers listeners credible methods for gaining financial freedom. D.J.B. © AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad - the international runaway bestseller that has held a top spot on the New York Times bestsellers list for over six years - is an investor, entrepreneur and educator whose perspectives on money and investing fly in the face of conventional wisdom. He has, virtually single-handedly, challenged and changed the way tens of millions, around the world, think about money.In communicating his point of view on why 'old' advice - get a good job, save money, get out of debt, invest for the long term, and diversify - is 'bad' (both obsolete and flawed) advice, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence and courage.Rich Dad Poor Dad ranks as the longest-running bestseller on all four of the lists that report to Publisher's Weekly - The New York Times, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today - and was named "USA Today's #1 Money Book" two years in a row. It is the third longest-running 'how-to' best seller of all time.Translated into 51 languages and available in 109 countries, the Rich Dad series has sold over 27 million copies worldwide and has dominated best sellers lists across Asia, Australia, South America, Mexico and Europe. In 2005, Robert was inducted into Amazon.com Hall of Fame as one of that bookseller's Top 25 Authors. There are currently 26 books in the Rich Dad series.In 2006 Robert teamed up with Donald Trump to co-author Why We Want You To Be Rich - Two Men - One Message. It debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestsellers list.Robert writes a bi-weekly column - 'Why the Rich Are Getting Richer' - for Yahoo! Finance and a monthly column titled 'Rich Returns' for Entrepreneur magazine.Prior to writing Rich Dad Poor Dad, Robert created the educational board game CASHFLOW 101 to teach individuals the financial and investment strategies that his rich dad spent years teaching him. It was those same strategies that allowed Robert to retire at age 47.Today there are more that 2,100 CASHFLOW Clubs - game groups independent of the Rich Dad Company - in cities throughout the world.Born and raised in Hawaii, Robert Kiyosaki is a fourth-generation Japanese-American. After graduating from college in New York, Robert joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam as an officer and helicopter gunship pilot. Following the war, Robert went to work in sales for Xerox Corporation and, in 1977, started a company that brought the first nylon and Velcro 'surfer wallets' to market. He founded an international education company in 1985 that taught business and investing to tens of thousands of students throughout the world.  In 1994 Robert sold his business and, through his investments, was able to retire at the age of 47. During his short-lived retirement he wrote Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Customer Reviews

I asked these people, and there were quite a few, if they read any of the author's books.
Clifford Lynn
Good debt is something someone else pays off for you (like a mortgage loan) bad debt is like credit card debt.
The Duke
It's simple, and most people should be able to follow his instructions and get out of debt.
Rondamarie B. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

67 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Justin Belkin on August 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
Kiyosaki wrote this book as the eighth installment of his Rich Dad Series. The book serves to constantly remind us that the key to increasing our chances of becoming wealthy requires the willingness to the pay the price. Discussing all the get rich schemes, such as game shows or playing the lottery, Kiyosaki writes, "There are better ways to become rich, with much better odds, but most people are not willing to pay the price" (x). The price to pay is the time and money you spend investing in your financial intelligence.

Kiyosaki recalls a truism once observed by Rich Dad, "The only people who think life should be easy are lazy people" (3). Kiyosaki rejects frugality as the best way toward becoming rich. Instead he recommends paying the price for higher financial intelligence, "...another way to become a millionaire is to improve your financial literacy, your financial intelligence, and be willing to be accountable to yourself, your results, your continuing education, and your personal development in becoming a better human being...that was a price I was willing to pay to become a millionaire" (81). Adopting such a mindset becomes tantamount to swimming against the current. Possessing faith and the fortitude to dedicate your life to accumulating wealth in this manner is crucial to overcome such naysayers as friends and family.

Rich Dad also observed, "One difference between a successful person and an average person is how much criticism they can take...Most people feel safer in the herd of the average" (150). Criticism tests one's resolve. You must be willing to make mistakes and to learn from them. Kiyosaki writes, "...the price of becoming rich is the willingness to make mistakes, to admit you made a mistake without blaming or justifying, and to learn" (18).
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Erik Nielsen on July 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
...unless you've never read any of his other books. Don't get me wrong, I can't say enough good things about Robert Kiyosaki's books. If you haven't read them (Rich Dad Poor Dad, Cashflow Quadrant, etc.), I highly recomemd that you do. But there's nothing new in this book. It just a retread of ideas already presented in his other books, and not as well. If fact, reading it felt like a advertisment for his other books and products.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Clifford Lynn on March 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is the second book I've read by Robert Kiyosaki. (Rich Dad, Poor Dad was the other book I've read). The ideas in the book are so valuable that it amazes me when people saw me read the book they would make comments on how the author is scamming people, making money on false hopes. I asked these people, and there were quite a few, if they read any of the author's books. Of course the answer was always a 'no'. I got the book out of the library, in hopes to build ideas. How are you going to learn becoming rich if you blame the rich for several of the world problems? This kind of generalization seems quite popular and creates a stop of the potential growth people have in ever attaining financial education. Am I rich, from reading this book? Not as much as I would like to be; however, the insight I've obtained is invaluable and is worth the price of the book. I also recommend: 'Think and Grow Rich' by Napolean Hill, 'The Secret of the Rich' by Ken Roberts and 'The 7 most Important Areas of Your Life' by Dr. Erwin Jay.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
Powerful! Powerful! Powerful.
That is the best way I can describe this book by Robert Kiyosaki. If you are tired of hearing how you have to cut up your credit cards to prevent debt then you must read this new book by RTK. It is his best ever!
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Lee VINE VOICE on April 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
First I'd like to say that in large Kiyosaki has some great ideas, and two of his books (the 1st rich dad poor dad and cash flow quadrant) were interesting reads. Unfortunately, this one isn't one of them. If this book was a set of new ideas or even just compilation of other works it would have been pretty good.

Sadly, this book just serves as one big advertisement of all of his other products, such as his board game, which he dedicates almost a full chapter for advertising it. There are glimmers of good information, but most of it is very vague.

To summarize, I wasn't very happy buying and reading a paperback commercial. I would recommend his other books, but I'm not sure I even have respect for the author anymore.
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Dboy on June 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
I am in the process of listening to books on CD as my job involoves a good deal of driving. I listenend to Rich Dad / Poor Dad and was invigorated. I decided to add this book on CD to my list. I just got done with it and actually skipped many parts as i felt that it was strictly a vehicle to promote other Kiyosaki products. There were really no new ideas in this book. Don't waste your time or money.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Chris Pascale on May 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
This handbook has some key advice wrapped up in the Kiyosakian story telling his readers have become familiar with. It is a great book to start out with if you have no interest in the others, and a good book to share its debt reducing tips with friends. Simple things like, don't use ATMs that charge money. You're paying to use your own money. You're better off getting cashback, or using a check if you can.
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Adam Troy on November 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
and more facts and more facts. Well you get the picture. No matter what Kiyosaki writes, his basher will write some trash about it. Facts are in Kiyosaki wins again. That Kiyosaki basher loses again and again and again and again. Well you get the picture.
If you really think that cutting up your credit cards is the answer to wealth, then I suppose you believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny too.
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