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Guide to Greece, Vol. 1: Central Greece Paperback – August 7, 1984


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Guide to Greece, Vol. 1: Central Greece + Guide to Greece, Vol. 2: Southern Greece + Blue Guide Greece: The Mainland (Blue Guides)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (August 7, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140442251
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140442250
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #540,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Greek

About the Author

Pausanias was a Greek geographer and native of Lydia who explored Greece, Macedonia, Asia and Africa, before settling in Rome. Pausanias is believed to have lived in the second half of the second century A.D. and is thought by some historians to have been a doctor as well as a scholar. Peter Levi was a Jesuit priest and archaelogical correspondent for The Times before his appointment as Professor of Poetry at Oxford. In addition to his translation of Pausanias he also published biographies of Tennyson, Edward Lear, Virgil, Horace and John Milton, and 22 volumes of poetry.

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Customer Reviews

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This edition is a good translation of Pausanias.
Xenophon
In fact, I often use books such as this to assist reading an atlas.
Alan U. Kennington
If you are interested in ancient Greece, you must read PAUSANIAS !
SEBASTIANVS

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Ian M. Slater TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
Yes, my title alludes to Shelley's poem about ancient Egypt, but the Greece that Pausanias describes has in many ways suffered a collapse as notable as that of Ozymandias. Looted before his time by Macedonians, Romans, and warring Greeks, it has since suffered from religious upheaval, antiquities collectors of various types, and, not least, the demolition of ancient structures to obtain building materials and limestone (for fertilizer). The notes to Peter Levi's translation (which is in two volumes -- if you order it, be sure to get both) gives many instances of these loses. This is not for someone planning a visit to Greece in the immediate future, nor easy reading for the curious (although browsing can be fun), but it is a remarkably valuable contribution to modern knowledge of the ancient world.

Sometime during the reign of Hadrian, a very well-read Greek set down a description of the Greek mainland, paying attention mainly to pre-Roman structures and works of art. A long tradition of German scholarship has denied that Pausanias ever left his library, ignoring English "amateurs" who had little trouble following him on the ground. Those interested in this controversy, or uncertain of whether they want to commit themselves to a work of this size, can now turn to Christian Habicht's first-rate introduction to the book and its critical reception, "Pausanias' Guide to Ancient Greece." Habicht also evaluates existing translations, including this one.

There is no substitute, however, for the riches lying within what looks like a dry account of buildings and natural wonders.

First of all, Pausanias had the good sense to avoid retelling the best-known stories and historical episodes, and give space to lesser-known material.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By cordyceps on February 8, 2013
Format: Paperback
When we arrived in Athens last summer and checked into the Hilton, I picked up a copy of "Guide to Greece" in the gift shop thinking it would be useful. What a disappointment! No restaurant ratings, bus info, or night life section - to say nothing of the complete absence of photographs. With a bit of luck we made it to the akropolis hoping to catch the sacrifice to Erechtheus featuring an oracle, only to find no quaint local rituals, not even a lousy roof on the Parthenon (as we discovered later, many temples in Greece lack roofs or even walls - the Greeks seem to have no concept of proper maintenance). Well, we made the best of it and "Guide to Greece" became something of a running joke: "Holler when you see the minotaurs!" Yeah, yeah. I gave it three stars just for the gag value, but this Pausanias guy must be a total slacker because this guide feels like it's seriously centuries out of date.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By SEBASTIANVS on April 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
One of the most interesting classical Greek texts. If you are interested in ancient Greece, you must read PAUSANIAS ! Of course Pausanias' series in the Loeb classical library are the best. And I don't agree with the policy of Penguin Classic's translator. However I recommend the book for English-speaking people who cannot read Classical Greek.
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