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Guillermo del Toro Cabinet of Curiosities: My Notebooks, Collections, and Other Obsessions Hardcover – October 29, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Design; First Edition edition (October 29, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062082841
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062082848
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 9.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,659 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“His creature fascination and his love of the macabre shine through in this book.” (New York Times)

“This lavishly illustrated book is the ultimate coffee table book for fans of the master Mexican filmmaker.” (Fangoria)

About the Author

Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Guillermo del Toro is the director of the films Cronos, Mimic, The Devil's Backbone, Blade II, Hellboy I, Hellboy II, and Pan's Labyrinth, which garnered enormous critical praise worldwide and won three Academy Awards.

Nacido y criado en Guadalajara, México, Guillermo del Toro ha dirigido muchas películas exitosas, incluso El laberinto del Fauno. Va a dirigir dos películas basadas en El Hobbit, que serán producidas por Peter Jackson.



Marc Scott Zicree has created classic episodes of "Star Trek-The Next Generation," "Deep Space Nine," "Babylon Five," "Sliders" and many more. He has appeared as a media expert on hundreds of radio and TV shows and is the author of the bestselling Twilight Zone Companion. He lives in West Hollywood with his wonderful wife, vile little dog, and affable big dog.


More About the Author

Born and raised in Guadalajara, Mexico in 1964, Guillermo Del Toro displayed rare filmmaking talent from an earlier age. A film prodigy dedicated to Latin American cinema, he soon earned a place on Time magazine's list of "50 Young Leaders for the New Millenium." After executive producing his first feature at age 22, he worked as a special effects make-up designer for several years before forming his own company, Necropia. In 1993, Del Toro made his feature directorial debut with the film Cronos, which went on to win multiple awards, including the Critics Prize at the Cannes Film Festival and eight of his country's academy awards. In the wake of that success he made his first foray into Hollywood filmmaking with Mimic (1997) starring Mira Sorvino. He returned to his native Mexico in 2001 to make The Devil's Backbone, a chilling ghost story set during the Spanish Civil War, a time period he revisited in 2006 in his masterpiece, Pan's Labyrinth, which garnered enormous critical praise worldwide and won three Academy Awards. He has also directed several successful comic-book inspired films such as Blade II, Hellboy I, and Hellboy II. He will direct two films based on THE HOBBIT, to be produced by Peter Jackson.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Packed with amazing photos and drawings.
Michele Marr
It's the kind of book you can read 20 times and find something new.
J. Cohen
A perfect gift for any follower of GdT or fan of the genres.
Is it really progress?

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By JMM TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Length: 0:50 Mins
If you've followed the career of director Guillermo del Toro, you no doubt have an admiration for his films. On the whole, some films are more successful than others - but they all have great design work. In particular, his films are known for their abundance of creatures (some elegant, others terrifying).

We get personal artwork from every film that Mr. del Toro has directed - "Cronos", "Mimic", "The Devil's Backbone", "Blade II", "Hellboy", "Pan's Labyrinth", "Hellboy II: The Golden Army", and "Pacific Rim". Most of these are early drawings, sketches, and storyboards - and some of it differs greatly from what appears in the finished film. There are also full-page scans from del Toro's idea journals, which includes extensive writing in both English and Spanish. I am so glad that this artwork has been made available, it shows how much time and effort goes into the designs of these movies.

Del Toro has been attached to dozens of projects, yet he has only made 8 films. So there's a lot of work that has yet to make it to the screen - fortunately, we also get a few pages of designs from some of these unfinished projects, such as "At the Mountains of Madness" and "Meat Market".

By far the best and most numerous designs come from "Pan's Labyrinth" and the two "Hellboy" movies... a lot of the book's real estate is dedicated to those films. In terms of disappointments, I would have liked to have seen more from "Pacific Rim" - there are about 10 pages or so on that movie, but oddly there are no Jaeger or Kaiju drawings.

What's NOT included in the book: most notably, del Toro spent 2+ years working on pre-production of "The Hobbit" before leaving the project. As a fan, I would have loved to see some of his artwork from Middle-Earth.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
So you're a fan of del Toro, otherwise you probably wouldn't even be looking at this page. The thing is, what you get out of this book ISN'T just another art book. It's not a collection of photos, stills, behind the scenes of his films or anything like that. At least, not intentionally though some of that does obviously creep in.

The book is a showcase of what make del Toro tick. Think of it as popping the top of his head off and watching his mind work, like the intricate machines he enjoys depicting in his films. It attempts to make connections inside of del Toro's mind, and show how he comes about his macabre, but brilliant, ideas and works.

There is a section for Bleak House, del Toro's home away from home, where his macabre sense of art meets his love of collections. And think of these collections as the inner workings of a cluttered, always thinking, always flowing, intense mind. And that's del Toro. We've seen some of this already in interviews and so on, but it's nice to see written descriptions by del Toro on the significance of "things."

Ever wanted to look into the mythical notebooks del Toro uses for his films? The ones where he collects all of his ideas and concepts then builds his films from there? We've seen some of this as well, but again, we further jump into the mind of del Toro and how it operates.

Also fascinating is the look at his unfinished works, or rather his as-of-yet-unproduced works. At the Mountains of Madness is something I desperately wish to see him finalize. The other unfinished projects all look like they could be promising as well, so perhaps one day we will see them all come to fruition?

You get a foreword by James Cameron. You get an afterword by Tom Cruise (no, really!).
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Parka TOP 50 REVIEWER on November 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Length: 2:20 Mins
If you like Guillermo del Toro's films, heard of his Bleak House but have never seen what's inside, or just admire his sense and sensibilities, this is going to be an incredible book for you. It provides wonderful insight into the working mind of a director and eclectic collector.

This is a big and heavy book. The hardcover is nicely embossed to make it feel like a wooden bookshelf. Inside, the book is filled with plenty of pictures and extensive text which makes for a substantial reading.

The book's roughly split into three parts, covering his collections, notebooks and lastly the unfinished projects.

The first part shows off the amazing collection of items found in his man cave, also known as Bleak House. There are photos of the different rooms and the incredible amount of objects he collects. There are movie props, huge piles of books, all sorts of character figures, a few life-size sculptures, one is of H.P. Lovecraft, in the hallway there's the monster Sammael from Hellboy and many more. The whole place feels like an intimate museum. The photos are delightful, and when you look closely you can spot surprises, such as a Totoro or a book you might also have read.

In this section, GDT also talks about his graphic inspirations, on how he read paintings, analyse films, explains his techniques of storytelling and his idea incubating notebooks. Fascinating.

The second part on notebooks actually looks at the eight films he has made so far, namely Cronos, Mimic, The Devil's Backbone, Blade II, Hellboy, Pan's Labyrinth, Hellboy II and Pacific Rim.

In interview style, author Marc Scott Zicree (MSZ) and GDT talks at length and in detail the inspiration behind each film. It's really insightful to read about how the ideas morph and evolve.
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