Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs After 9/11 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.00
  • Save: $3.50 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by TheBookendShop
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order. Book has been read, but remains in great condition. Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition. Recycle a Book!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs After 9/11 Paperback – January 1, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.50
$5.00 $1.94


Frequently Bought Together

Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs After 9/11 + Arabs and Muslims in the Media: Race and Representation after 9/11 (Critical Cultural Communication)
Price for both: $33.70

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle Business Book Daily Deal
Today only, Dennis Bakke's "The Decision Maker" is on sale for only $1.99. Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Olive Branch Pr (January 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566566843
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566566841
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,204,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this meticulously researched book, Shaheen (Reel Bad Arabs) spotlights anti–Muslim and Arab stereotypes and probes the intersections of popular culture and foreign policy. The author investigates the close ties between Hollywood studios and Washington and recounts how, historically, the strategic stereotyping of populations has been used to garner popular support for governmental policies, citing the career of Leni Riefenstahl and speeches by Lenin and Goebbels to illustrate film's long history as a propaganda vehicle. In an index of more than 100 post-9/11 films, the book depicts and debunks the most prevalent stereotypes of reel Arabs—exotic camel-riding nomad, oppressed maiden, corrupt sheikh, terrorist. Dehumanizing portrayals of Arabs have real consequences, according to Shaheen; he draws correlations between the media's depiction of Arabs and the massive support for the invasion of Iraq, the wanton killing of Iraqi civilians and the escalating number of hate crimes against Arabs (or people who look like Arabs) in the United States. Unfortunately, after his superbly readable historical survey, Shaheen's list of solutions—entertainment summits and sample pro-Arab film treatments—seem disappointingly prosaic. Still this book's scope and its impassioned delivery make for an insightful and rewarding read.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Brimming with insight, erudition, and personal wisdom, Jack Shaheen's Guilty is a crucial, timely work. This analysis of Hollywood's portrayal of Arabs not only describes a dire situation-- placing it in global and historic context-- but offers readers important solutions with wide-ranging artistic, social, and political implications. Hard hitting and true." -- Diana Abu Jaber, author of Crescent

"...superbly readable...this book's scope and its impassioned delivery make for an insightful and rewarding read...In this meticulously researched book, Shaheen (Reel Bad Arabs) spotlights anti-Muslim and Arab stereotypes and probes the intersections of popular culture and foreign policy. The author investigates the close ties between Hollywood studios and Washington and recounts how, historically, the strategic stereotyping of populations has been used to garner popular support for governmental policies, citing the career of Leni Riefenstahl and speeches by Lenin and Goebbels to illustrate film's long history as a propaganda vehicle. In an index of more than 100 post-9/11 films, the book depicts and debunks the most prevalent stereotypes of 'reel Arabs'-'exotic camel-riding nomad,' oppressed maiden, corrupt sheikh, terrorist. Dehumanizing portrayals of Arabs have real consequences, according to Shaheen; he draws correlations between the media's depiction of Arabs and the massive support for the invasion of Iraq, the 'wanton' killing of Iraqi civilians and the escalating number of hate crimes against Arabs (or people who look like Arabs) in the United States." -- Publishers Weekly

"Dr. Jack Shaheen does it again. The accomplished author, professor and media veteran sifts through hundreds of hours of film to give us clear cut examples, as well as keen insight, into Hollywood's obsession with bad Arabs and murderous Muslims post 9/11. Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs After 9/11 is a fascinating social study on the relationship between racism and cinema, and ultimately, how popular entertainment has the power to propagate damaging images of misunderstood cultures or destroy them. Shaheen deftly demonstrates that Hollywood's greatest enemy is not the Muslim or Arab, but the ignorant stereotype." -- Lorraine Ali, Newsweek

"My first step in researching what would become the film, `Syriana,' was the confrontation of an inherent bias against the Arab world. So many of my received (often received from films and television) notions were simply wrong. This was a starting point for our script and Jack Shaheen's mission over the last many years. He provides an incredibly valuable book in the breaking down of the stereotyping and racism that fires miscommunication from both sides of the ideological gulf." -- Stephen Gaghan, director, writer

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 12 customer reviews
This reader made good use of this section of the book.
Jamal M. Najjab
For those who wish to explore the stereotypical images of Arabs and Muslims in hollywood post 9/11, this is an excellent resource.
Edgar Hopida
For those who care about educating themselves and not being taken in by the glitz of Hollywood, I highly recommend this book!
Mary Ann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jamal M. Najjab on June 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
THE INFLUENCE and power of movies in American society, as well as the rest of the world, cannot easily be avoided. One aspect of our lives that films affect more than most is how we perceive and interact with the world outside of the U.S. and those who inhabit it. According to Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan, "Movies are really hard-wired into our psyches, shaping how we view the world. It's when politics infiltrate entertainment that it is most subversive--and most effective...Artful entertainment easily beats full-on propaganda."

With this in mind, Professor Jack G. Shaheen--described by veteran journalist Helen Thomas as "a one-man anti-defamation league" because he's devoted much of his adult life to persuading Hollywood to be fair in its portrayal of Arabs and Muslims--has penned his latest book, Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs After 9/11.

According to Shaheen, author of the bestseller Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People, "Arabs remain the most maligned group in the history of Hollywood. Malevolent stereotypes equating Islam and Arabs with violence have endured for more than a century...Arab=Muslim=Godless Enemy." In fact, Shaheen argues, the entertainment industry's vilifying of Arabs and Muslims helped prepare the American public, as well as our fighting men and women, to go to war in the Middle East.

Shaheen makes it clear that the U.S. government has had a hand in ensuring that Hollywood sends the public a negative image of this part of the world and the majority of the people who live there. "Filmmaking is political," he explains. "Dehumanizing stereotypes emerging from the cinema, TV, and other media help support government policies, enabling producers to more easily advance and solidify stereotypes.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
The aptly named `Guilty' updates Professor Shaheen's acclaimed book `Reel Bad Arabs' which was written just before Sept. 11, 2001. In each book he underscores, and documents the close connection between the political world and the entertainment one (yet, rather amazingly, he never uses the world "propaganda."). He quotes Jack Valenti in the prologue: "Washington and Hollywood spring from the same DNA." Few anecdotes better underscore this nexus than the one told in the same section about a special screening of the movie `Black Hawk Down' , before its general release, for 800 top Washington officials and military brass, including Donald Rumsfeld and Oliver North, in which they were permitted to suggest changes.

Shaheen places his subject, Hollywood, and its movies, within the greater context of the post 9/11 world in the first chapter, quoting the anti-Islamic and anti-Arab bigotry and prejudice of such public figures as Ann Coulter, Donald Rumsfeld and Tom Tancredo. The inflammatory remarks clearly led to an increase in hate-crimes, which frequently spill over against other darker skinned, and "different-looking" people like the Sikhs. Shaheen also reminds us of similar negative depictions of other ethnic groups: American Indians, Blacks, Orientals, Latinos and Jews. For the Arabs, the four negative stereotypes that are constantly promoted, as Shaheen says, are that they are all fabulously wealth; barbaric and uncultured; sex maniacs; and revel in acts of terrorism.

In his chapter on the negative movies about Arabs since 9-11, he identifies a separate category, which he calls "cameos." These are gratuitous slurs against Arabs and Islam in movies that have nothing to do with this subject, or even "terrorism." I was first struck by this concept when I read Theodore H.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Hollywood has always used the public's fear and loathing to create interest in its film projects. In the 1980s, the communists were the most common villain in big budget Hollywood action movies. In the 2000s...Middle Eastern Terrorists have taken over that role - "Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs after 9/11" is a scholarly look at this most common trend and how it both impacts and represents society. It also gives an optimistic look as the generic terrorist isn't the only Arabic representative in American film, but characters with real human motivations seem to be making an effort at becoming the norm. "Guilty: Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs after 9/11" is highly recommended to both social issues and film collections for community libraries.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Pro Bill of Rights Citizen on September 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
Dr. Jack Shaheen has done it again. This book is excellent. GUILTY reminds us of the deep rooted connections between Washington DC and Hollywood...and the unfortunate bigotry that exists in movie making.

There is storytelling in painting the bad guy or bad race image. I guess it's Arabs and Muslims turn. Others have come before them - Women, African Americans, Hispanics, etc...let's stop generalizing across religion, race, gender and ethnicity. There is good and bad in all types of people. GUILTY gets you thinking about all of this.

Bravo Dr. Shaheen.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Edgar Hopida on April 10, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Professor Jack Shaheen's starts where he left off in his previous book Reel Bad Arabs. Like in his earlier works, this book covers the range of films that have come out after 9/11 and analyzes them in light of whether or not they pepetuate the stereotypical Arab or Muslim.

To much of the surprise of moviegoers like myself, many of the box office hits and critically acclaimed films of the post 9/11 era contain negative and often stereotypical images of Arabs and Muslims. Despite the dissmal track record of hollywood on portraying Arabs, we do have balanced and or postive images of Muslims and or Arabs like Syriana and Kingdom of Heaven.

For those who wish to explore the stereotypical images of Arabs and Muslims in hollywood post 9/11, this is an excellent resource.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?