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34 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No matter which side of the Gun Rights issue you fall on, you'll find this a fun read and learn a bit about the other side
You will not agree with everything than Dan Baum has to say, but that is not the point of the book. In this country and in our Government, we have tolerated name calling, assertions devoid of facts, threats, and belittling in the place of rational debate with the only result being that everyone is seething and left feeling that those on the other side are idiots. The...
Published 21 months ago by Charles

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars entertaining, but somehow he missed a crucial point
Dan Baum's "Gun Guys" is entertaining, and might be a bit of a bridge between some of the pro-gun and anti-gun factions.

My complaint is that he misses the crucial point about the essential difference between pro-gun and anti-gun people:

The anti-gun folks believe that government should make all the essential decisions about how people live their...
Published 18 months ago by Mr John Haueisen


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34 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No matter which side of the Gun Rights issue you fall on, you'll find this a fun read and learn a bit about the other side, March 8, 2013
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
You will not agree with everything than Dan Baum has to say, but that is not the point of the book. In this country and in our Government, we have tolerated name calling, assertions devoid of facts, threats, and belittling in the place of rational debate with the only result being that everyone is seething and left feeling that those on the other side are idiots. The internet is especially rife with this. Sheesh guys, lighten up! The right and the left are pushed into their respective corners at this point and they can't seem to even speak with each other.

This book is an attempt to restore civility to the discussion and even if you don't agree with everything Dan has to say, you will get something out of it. Conservative gun owners will start to understand that not all Liberals want to take their guns (40% of us actually have guns, many of us carry, and plenty of us don't think that 2A is at all ambiguous and that we could certainly be allys in this debate). Gun control advocates might start to understand that gun rights are often felt as part of the package of self reliance and personal responsibility that many gun owners and 2A proponents have and why many get so worked up when their gun rights are threatened. They might start to understand that they can't just keep the parts of the Constitution that they like and steamroll those they don't and they may start to come to the conclusion that an Assault Weapons Ban is pretty ludicrous. Seriously, if you've ever been to a gun show or shooting range you'll realize that that horse has long ago left the barn.

"Gun Guys" is a fun read for everyone but especially for us liberals who have gotten into the habit of swapping their "North Face" beanies for "John Deere" caps, and leaving their Starbucks lattes in their Subarus just before going into their local gun store.

Thanks Dan!

BTW I'm a liberal and I love my country, love clean water, big skies, and wide open places, love the constitution (all of it), voted for Obama (twice) and think he's a decent guy, but also love the smell of cordite, the crack of a supersonic round, and the feel of a warm barrel after sending a pile of lead down range and love that we live in a country that trusts its citizens enough that it guarantees this right as one of its founding principles.... and I'm not the only one.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Definite Mind-Changer, June 9, 2013
By 
E. Kohen (Santa Fe, NM USA) - See all my reviews
I started this book as a general foe of guns and a specific foe of assault weapons. Baum's well-written and never-preachy book made me realize how little I understood about most of the issues in the pro- v. anti-gun world. I'll be re-reading this one, probably within a few months....and instead of a library copy I'll be buying one so I can underline those passages most meaningful to me. About halfway through, I sent an email to 15 or 20 friends, some of whom are long-time NRA members, some of whom are so rabidly for or against guns that there's no talking with them, and some of whom were neither hot nor cold on guns. There's material enough in Gun Guys for all of them.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amending the Second, March 14, 2013
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sneaky-sneaky (Moscow on Hudson) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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A nuanced, balanced, and entertaining exploration of gun culture, 'Gun Guys' is Dan Baum's fourth book. The author decides to concealed-carry for a year, and travels around shooting ranges, gun stores, hunts, and meets with advocates on both sides of the gun debate. Mr. Baum manages to deliver a number of facts along the way, and is pretty convincing about the failures of various gun control measures that have been tried, or are under consideration.
If you're ex-military like myself, you have a certain healthy respect for automatic weapons; and if you're a left-leaning, big-city liberal, once again like myself, then you may feel rather conflicted about guns, as does the author. And he works it all out. One of Baum's suggestions is that if 'we' must have a liberal agenda of gay marriage and abortion rights, then 'they' should be allowed their guns. Fair enough.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A liberal gun lover's odyssey through gun culture hits bookshelves right after Newtown, March 17, 2013
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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Dear Dan,

It's been a while since we've been in touch. Imagine my surprise when I saw you'd written a book on gun guys. Well, not that much of a surprise. I knew you liked guns. When I was thinking of getting my first one, you recommended I buy an M-1. A good solid rifle that helped win WWII. (Instead I got a Russian Baikal 12-gauge over-under. Long story.)

I wasn't sure what to expect here. In the first article I saw on it - your column in the Wall Street Journal - you spent most of your time bashing gun guys as yahoos. In an interview you did someplace - maybe it was in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, picked up from the San Francisco Chronicle - you were a little more fair. (Shame on the AJC, though, for labeling you "Frank Baum" in the headline. You did once work for them. And you never wrote "The Wizard of Oz.")

It's a great read. I must tell you, I keep turning the pages like I usually don't for non-fiction books. You're a good journalist. You marshal the facts, bring the color, make it live and keep it moving. Maybe I like the story because I know you, and Margaret, who I will always think of as Meg. (She is a fine journalist herself. In one story she worked on at Michigan J School, she was having trouble finding the central strand. I helped her talk it out and explain it to herself. Only years later did I realize she'd discovered, back in 1981, campus tensions caused by the then-not-yet-a-household-word Muslim Brotherhood.)

Anyway, back to guns. Your central premise is clever. Northern Jewish guy who is liberal-to-left in every other way harbors a lifelong fascination with guns, definitely not a liberal-to-left Northern Jewish thing. He decides to go on a road trip, a la "Confederates in the Attic", to look at gun culture, to mingle with the folks with whom he shares this fascination (if little else), and to get into their heads in part by getting into his own head. To make it really real, he gets a concealed-carry permit and starts carrying a gun everywhere he legally can, starting where he lives, in la-di-dah Boulder, the Portland of the Rockies. He examines how he feels and relates it to how gun guys generally feel. He interviews lots of people. Users, shooters, instructors, dealers, rich guys who collect machine guns, 20-something gun fans still living with their parents.

(Okay, back to you in the second person.) You look at every side of the issue. Your ambivalence is what keeps the book moving. These aren't your people but you see that about guns they might be right. You don't like much else about them, as the individualistic way they look at the world opposes the collectivist way you look at it, and their occasional yahooness pushes your hot buttons.

You increasingly see the facts, though, as they, the gun guys, see them. You discover how differently you feel when carrying: Alert, examining others, trying to determine who might be a threat - but never, ever daydreaming. You just can't do that when you've got a deadly weapon on you.

You were doing the research on this book back in 2010.

And you had no freaking clue it was going to be published right after Newtown hit.

This puts you in a serious bind. The book is written mostly for other liberals, as you try to explain your lifelong hobby to people who mostly hate it. And, you thought, maybe if you did a good job, bringing reason and facts to bear, they'd like you despite your hoplophilia, and you could come out of the closet about it. (Good metaphor: you didn't think you could let even Margaret know you were carrying when you first started to. So you would quietly take your gun out of a closet gun-safe and slip it under your clothes when you went out.)

Fat chance now. The AR-15 you mention frequently - the most popular rifle nowadays, and you explain why (it can be endlessly accessorized, like Barbie) - is now as popular with gun control advocates as Auschwitz is. So, too, is a central premise of your book: that those who carry are in fact the protective "sheep dogs" of society, always on watch, always on guard, conceivably stopping some of those Newtowns from happening. Making this argument now, you'd never make it out of an Upper West Side dinner party alive.

So, I'm guessing here, you decide to turn lemons into lemonade: the book may be far more controversial than you had planned, but now it's also very timely. Use the furor to sell it. All the reviews and interviews I've seen indicate that's working. May you sell many copies, my friend. Good luck. You deserve it.

Midway through, you focus on the to-you annoying conservatism of nearly all gun people you encounter. They rant about Obama. They rant about the government taking over everything and restricting personal liberty. They wreck your whole day every time the talk turns to politics. You roll your eyeballs, noting that Obama hadn't done anything (this is as of 2010) regarding guns except allow them to be carried in national parks. What are they so worried about? At that time, you felt they'd won most gun policy battles in recent years.

Do you understand now what they were worried about? Liberals variously want to ban AR-15s, assault rifles, handguns, large capacity magazines or all guns, period. Or all gun activities except hunting. Or that too. You were intrigued by that 100-round capacity magazine one guy had adapted to a rifle, but that magazine might be a felony in the not-too-distant future if your liberal friends have their way. This is no longer a black-helicopter paranoia thing. It's real.

I respect greatly your undertaking this book and how many compelling facts in favor of gun rights you bring to bear on it:

--That at the lowest estimates - those generated by a gun-hating Harvard sociologist - guns used in self defense at minimum prevent 8 times more deaths than other guns take, and probably many more than that.

--That concealed-carry-licensees commit crimes at one-quarter the national average.

--That the crime wave of Florida's coke-fueled "Miami Vice" period in the 1980s was ended when Florida radically loosened carry laws. And that while other factors may have contributed, allowing honest citizens to carry guns didn't result in the bloodbath gun-control advocates had predicted. Just the opposite.

I respect your getting in the faces equally of the NRA and the Brady gun control people.

I respect your putting yourself out there in a world you have never felt quite comfortable with, although I think you make too much of how you don't look like a gun guy because you're Jewish, balding and middle-aged. The whole putting-on-an-NRA-hat-to-pass thing was just silly. Millions and millions of people own guns. Gun guys look like everyone, as you yourself report, not just Hans and Franz and scary neo-Nazi goyim. (Maybe I see this differently. I live in suburban Atlanta where half the gun owners I know are Jewish. Where the local gun range is run by two Jewish mothers. And where another Jewish mother, who also volunteers for PTO at our kids' school, actually advised me, when I mulled buying a handgun: "Try the Sig Sauer P-226 9 millimeter semi-automatic. You'll like it!" You know, like a really good brisket!)

My take would have been, get in there, maybe they size you up visually and peg you for half a second, but forget about it when you start talking guns. (Or are you perhaps interested in preserving, for this book's putative liberal readers, the notion that gun owners, apart from you, are racists and bigots?)

You focus a lot on gun guys' "rage" and "anger". It's a common trope. On the other hand, I know a lot of liberals still suffering from Bush Derangement Syndrome. Yeah, I have to tell you, it's anger and hate and rage when you guys do it, too, although no one seems to use your hate to segue into the topics of "hate speech" and "hate crimes" sanctionable in various ways ranging up to time in prison.(You do, to your credit, note that gun guys in fact excel at controlling their own anger when carrying. They realize escalation of a minor incident out in the street might result in their having to shoot someone, and it just isn't worth it.)

But I must warn you: A world of hurt will descend on you as you feel the full weight of liberal hate. To them, you might as well be a birther, or a Glenn Beck fan, or Sarah Palin, because you have touched the third-rail of liberalism at about the worst time in history to do that.

I hate to tell you this, Dan, but you'll never eat lunch in Boulder again.

Maybe in Colorado Springs.

Regards,

Dan

P.S. Tell Meg I said hi.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Tour Of Gun World, April 21, 2013
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I am a criminal defense lawyer and despise firearms because of the consequences their use too often yields in my clients' lives: I cannot recall the number of murder cases I've had in which a young man, usually inner city and Black, kills a rival over a girl, a bottle of whiskey, or some imagined "disrespect." When I was a kid, these contests got resolved with fists. Now, two lives are lost -- the decendent and his too often impuslive killer.

Where'd all these guns come from? Isn't there some way to get them off of the street? I fume sometimes about repealing the Second Amendment. No one is serious about the use of guns to combat tyranny. Government is more powerful and all-encompassing than ever in the 21st century. What's more, the power of government to suppress any challenge with force is overwhelming. Instead of using guns to fight government, we kill each other and tell ourselves patriotic lies to justify it all.

So I read this book to learn about the other side after reading an interview of the author with Joe Nocera, a columnist in The New York Times. I thought the author handled himself well in the interview.

I am glad I read the book. It did not change my mind about the scourage that guns have become in our society. But it did make me realize how my blinders have kept me from appreciating the appeal of guns to so many Americans. Frankly, the book even got me a little curious abuot guns, truth be told.

I doubt we will ever get rid of guns in the United States. I did not know that some folks buy guns, and then bury them in protective covers to make them harder to find should the government ever try to seize them all.

I'm not sure guns are a necessary part of the American psyche; I am sure that dislodging them from the place they hold in the minds of many Americans will be a task even more difficult than the battle to transform cigarettes from indicia of what's cool into cancer sticks.

I recommend this book to anyone curious about the ubiquity of guns and what makes guns so controversial in American life. The writing is always good, and the author is always fair. He did not change my mind, but I now look at those on the other side with a respect and understanding I did not have before reading this book.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dan tries to be one of the guys, May 29, 2013
By 
BrianB (Northern California) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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I will give the author points. He really tried to explain the culture of the gun in America, and he tries to write a balanced story about a divisive issue. Unfortunately he seems compelled to defend gun ownership in every chapter, which reveals a certain bias. He is not writing to the people who own guns and want to keep them. He is writing to people who want to disarm the United States. This book becomes an apologetic. Many liberals will read this and might be amused at parts, definitely angered by other parts, but it will not change their minds. Most conservatives will read through Mr. Baum in the first chapter, and throw it on the discard pile. The pity of the matter is that he really tries to be objective, and he does present both sides to the gun ownership argument. He is a gun owner, and he speaks clearly about his own views. His credentials as a liberal democrat make this a fascinating read.

The author ridicules gun advocates for predicting that Obama was simply waiting for his second term to reveal his anti-gun agenda. Ironically this book comes out shortly after their suspicions were confirmed. Mr. Baum might want to revise that chapter. But he does make valid points about the bad attitudes of some gun store clerks, and the volatile us-against-them attitude of the gun rights crowd. In their defense, people should get angry about a government that wants to take away what they see as a vital civil right.

Mr. Baum is a well organized and amusing writer. He is quite skilled in the art. His stories (this reads as a series of stories) are a bit wordy at times, and he repeats himself, but the overall product is polished and professional.

Pro-gun and anti-gun: perhaps the divide is too great to be bridged. This author tried to present an unbiased view.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Balanced, Sane, Rational Look at America's Gun Culture, March 13, 2013
By 
Terry Sunday (El Paso, Texas United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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"Gun Guys" author Dan Baum describes himself thusly: "A stoop-shouldered, bald-headed, middle-aged Jew in pleated pants and glasses, I looked like a card-carrying biscuit nibbler." An image of Woody Allen comes to mind. But appearances are often deceiving, for Mr. Baum is also a gun owner, holds a handgun concealed carry license and has been involved with firearms for much of his life. In "Gun Guys," he accomplishes a remarkable feat. Documenting his year-long road trip to all the nooks and crannies of America's gun culture, this narrative of his journey is perhaps the most balanced, sane and rational look at why and how people across the country relate to their guns that has been published in years--if not ever.

There's hardly an aspect of gun culture that Mr. Baum does not delve deeply into with extreme perceptiveness, an eye for detail, a broad and deep knowledge of firearms and a quirky sense of humor that often had me laughing out loud. But make no mistake about it--this is not intended to be a Dave Barry book. Balanced, utterly nonjudgmental and with no obvious political bias for or against guns, Mr. Baum simply reports on what he found talking to ordinary people on his visits to gun shops, firearms training classes, competitions, machine-gun shoots, inner-city ghettos, gun shows and more. With no apparent ideological axe to grind, his look at Americans and their guns is probably as close to "ground truth" as we're likely to get. The strident voices of the rabid pro- and anti-gun factions are here, of course, but so are those of many intelligent, thoughtful, reasonable gun owners who are usually drowned out in the debate. Sure, "Gun Guys" is anecdote-based rather than presenting rigorous scientific data, but I believe it gives a true, accurate and vivid picture of typical American firearms owners and their views and attitudes.

I'll go so far as to say that I think every Washington politician should read "Gun Guys." It's that important a book. Perhaps the publisher could donate a copy to each member of Congress. Our politicians, subjected to the endless shouting of special interests rather than rational, moderate voices, need to realize that not every gun owner is a wild-eyed conspiracy nut with a tin-foil hat and not everyone who backs stricter gun laws (or stricter enforcement of existing laws) is a long-haired, tree-hugging stoner. There's a lot of room for agreement in the middle.

Here's what I think is one of the most powerful statements in the book, one that surely everyone, whether pro-gun or anti-gun, can agree with: "[The NRA's] white-hot combativeness and inflexibility put a scary face on the American gun guy, and this was hardly the way to win people over and expand the circle of firearms-tolerant Americans, which seemed to me a much more worthwhile exercise. As a gun guy, I kept waiting for the NRA--which understands guns and their use better than any other entity--to make itself an honest partner in the national effort to reduce further gun violence and gun accidents. Merely shouting `More guns for everybody!' didn't qualify--to me anyway."

A uniquely balanced, reasonable and apolitical examination, "Gun Guys" is filled with rational, sane, common-sense observations of America's gun culture that might mollify those on both extreme ends of the debate, if only they would read it. I sincerely hope many of them do.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars entertaining, but somehow he missed a crucial point, June 5, 2013
By 
Mr John Haueisen (WORTHINGTON, OHIO United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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Dan Baum's "Gun Guys" is entertaining, and might be a bit of a bridge between some of the pro-gun and anti-gun factions.

My complaint is that he misses the crucial point about the essential difference between pro-gun and anti-gun people:

The anti-gun folks believe that government should make all the essential decisions about how people live their lives. This includes regulating or banning behavior and objects that government determines are dangerous, or just something that government wants to control.

The pro-gun folks believe that government's domain ends when it interjects itself into basic human (some would say God-given) rights, like the right to defend your life and the lives of your loved-ones.

To anti-gunners, the gun is a dangerous object from which they want government authorities to protect them, regardless of the historical proof that criminals and sociopaths always are able to find "the tools of their trade," whether these be knives, clubs, or a can of gasoline.

To pro-gunners, the gun is a tool. Yes, it can be used by bad guys to commit crimes, but it can be used by good guys to stop crimes. Hammers can build houses, just as hammers can crush skulls. The pro-gunners just can't understand why "gun-banners" are not content to use law to address criminals, instead of tools, which can be used or abused, depending on the mind of the handler.

Baum dwells too much on trying to establish a "gun culture," and trying to describe the idiosyncrasies of pro- and anti-gun groups.

He misses the point that it is an ideological difference between those who accept personal responsibility for their lives and actions, and those who prefer to have government control all aspects of everyone else's life. Agree with it or not, this is a crucial point.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Justifying the Ways of the Gun Owner to Liberals, March 21, 2013
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This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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Dan Baum has spent a lot of time trying to reconcile his two halves and, in a sense, two halves of America. There's liberal Jewish Democrat Baum and there's Baum who's had a love of guns and shooting since he was five years old. He thinks the rift in his soul is a rift in America, that, if he can explain why guns are important to so many of us, maybe he can get his friends, family, and political allies to understand and accept - as in not trying to ban and control - guns. And, maybe, those of us who like guns will become less suspicious of his politics. We'll all unite in attacking the future in a Progressive way.

Gun lovers and conservatives really aren't the target here for this book. Stereotypical liberals are.

This is not a book retreading criminological statistics (a brief chapter of footnotes covers that). Baum talks to people, except for members of the military or police, to whom guns are important.

I'm not a hardcore gun enthusiast, but I am a lifetime NRA member and have hung out at shooting ranges in three states. Many of the encounters Baum describes remind me of people I've meant then: hunters, competitive shooters, those interested in the technology of guns, preppers and survivalists, doctors - perhaps learning another way to "manage death" as one puts it, and guys who let complete strangers fire their new $9,000 gun. He also talks to four types of gun guys you would not readily think of: a weapons master for Hollywood productions, an engineer who became an evangelizer of gun ownership to his fellow blacks after he was robbed at gunpoint, a former Chicago gang member once jailed for shooting a man (and the only interview subject who has actually been shot), and a Jew who published academic works showing the direct inspiration of Nazi gun control laws on American gun control legislation and the role of gun control in fostering genocide in several countries -works pretty much ignored by every side of the gun debate. This is an honest, thorough, fun book.

These aren't dry interviews. Baum is funny and knows how to tell a story. Maybe, since he already related his own hunting stories, the "Hogzilla" chapter about hunting wild pigs in Texas wasn't strictly necessary, but it's the funniest of the book. He careens across the country starting out enthusiastically (and legally) packing a pistol in the Whole Foods Market in Boulder - and disappointingly noting no reaction - and ending up at NRA headquarters.

The matter of the NRA brings up one problem of the book. Baum constantly harps on people wanting to arm themselves out of fear of crime - even while crime rates are going down. He sees the NRA as exaggerating crime for political ends instead of concentrating on useful gun safety programs. The importance of maintaining a legal right and ability of armed self-defense no matter what the level of present personal danger is doesn't seem to occur to him.

Baum also spends a lot of time pointing out that Democrats and the Obama administration have given up on gun control. Indeed, he points out the Obama administration's only action on guns was to make it easier to carry concealed weapons in national parks. While he does acknowledge the futility and ignorance behind the Feinstein "assault weapons" ban, he says that's in the past. Obama and his political allies don't want to confiscate guns and restrict Second Amendment rights. That's just NRA fear mongering to get donations.

Of course, history has invalidated that viewpoint post-Sandy Hook. The NRA's fears turned out to be entirely justified. Gun-grabbing is in the DNA of many Democrats though, in fairness to Baum, I have met other Democrat and Obama supporters who like guns. I would dearly like to know how Baum would revise his book in light of recent history. His Democrat party has made gun control a priority again. His native state of Colorado has passed significant gun control legislation.

To his credit, Baum, at the end, begins to maybe see that many people in America are feeling "overmanaged and under-respected" in many areas, that their exasperated rhetoric often sounds like gun owners. Will he have a change of heart? I'm afraid that, like one of his interviewees, I think most political opinions are almost genetic, emotion based, rationalized with a patina of reason and very refractory. That goes for opinions on guns.

To be honest, while I'd like to hope Baum will change the minds of his fellow liberals, I don't think he will. I think gun guys will be the ones that most enjoy this book.

There is one theme running through this book which is interesting no matter which side of the debate you are on. Baum says that the experience of frequently carrying a weapon calmed him, made him more observant, and even more eager to avoid a confrontation. It seems that there might be something to be said for managing death, truly and practically considering the consequences of that power. One of his subjects thinks this is what links the place of the gun in American culture to the respect and mythic place the samurai has in Japan or the medieval knight in Europe.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fun read that gives a look into the diverse gun culture of America, March 6, 2013
This review is from: Gun Guys: A Road Trip (Hardcover)
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Dan Baum has crafted an entertaining diary of his exploration of America's gun culture. As a caveat, I think that one of the important things to remember when reading this book is that it reflects his opinion in many cases, and is not the definitive word on various topics. For example, early in the book he states that handguns and shotguns are better home defense weapons than AR-15s. Actually, the "best" home defense weapon depends on, e.g., where you live, your shooting skills, your physical abilities (do you have severe arthritis? Are you disabled?), and personal preferences.

A self-described gun-loving liberal Democrat, Baum goes on a cross-country tour sporting an NRA cap and does a pretty good job of describing the attitudes, thoughts and rationales of people who choose to own weapons, albeit with snark that I did not really think was necessary at times. Born to a liberal Jewish family, Baum starts with a brief introduction to his first interactions with firearms at age 5, back in 1961. While his parents didn't really encourage his interest (his mom told him that "Jews make and sell guns, we don't shoot them"), they didn't actively discourage him, either, and he developed a life-long love of firearms, particularly antique ones. Interspersed with his opinions on various topics, he does a good job of looking at the pros and cons of a number of gun-related arguments, revealing an open mind and a willingness to look at facts, no matter whom they benefit. A timely book that gives voice, in particular, to gun-loving democrats who enjoy shooting sports.
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Gun Guys: A Road Trip
Gun Guys: A Road Trip by Dan Baum (Hardcover - March 5, 2013)
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