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Gunning for God: Why the New Atheists are Missing the Target Paperback – October 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Lion Hudson; First Edition 2011 edition (October 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745953220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745953229
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #68,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Recent books touting atheism have been grounded more on dyspepsia than on dispassionate reason. In this book John considers the best, most recent science from physics and biology, and demonstrates that the picture looks far different from what we've been told."  —Michael Behe, author, Darwin's Black Box, on God's Undertaker



"A brilliantly argued re-evaluation of the relation of science and religion, casting welcome new light on today's major debates. A must-read for all reflecting on the greatest questions of life."  —Alister McGrath, author, Glimpsing the Face of God on God's Undertaker



"[An] erudite and wide-ranging guide."—The Vessel Project

About the Author

John Lennox is a professor of mathematics and the philosophy of science at the University of Oxford. A popular Christian apologist and scientist, Lennox travels widely speaking on the interface between science and religion. He is the author of Christianity: Opium or Truth?, The Definition of Christianity, God's Undertaker, and Key Bible Concepts.

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Customer Reviews

His book is very readable.
dnag
In this book Lennox also deals with the arguments of the New Atheists.
rossuk
I've now read all but one of John's books.
Mr. Stephen N. Driscoll

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

99 of 107 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Stephen N. Driscoll on October 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
The best praise that I could give to Gunning for God: A Critique of the New Atheism, is that it would be difficult even for its staunchest critic not to admit that it lands some pretty accurate blows.

Lennox confines his focus in the book to a few central distortions of the science and religion debate, not attempting in this book alone to provide either a comprehensive defence of theism or a comprehensive refutation of New Atheism.

Lennox begins by arguing that science is compatible with faith, and indeed that science provides evidence for theistic belief.

He then addresses several popular misconceptions of the history of the relationship between science and faith, and between faith and violence. Lennox considers possible links between atheism and violence, before concluding that both worldviews are sufficient soil, capable of sowing the seeds of hatred.

The author next presents Hume's `is-ought' problem, applied to materialistic morality. If the universe is only composed of matter, as the popular argument goes, then all we can say about anything, is that it `is.' We cannot derive morality, which relies on `oughts' out of what simply `is.' If the universe just `is,' morality needs redefining.

Lennox then defends the biblical God against two charges, 1. that His behaviour in the Old Testament is tyrannical, and, 2. that the biblical picture of Jesus dying for our sins as a substitute, is immoral.

He argues that miracles are not ruled out by the laws of nature, and that belief in such events is not necessarily evidence of insanity.
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62 of 68 people found the following review helpful By R. R. Morris on November 14, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After reading and enjoying Prof. Lennox' book "7 Days that Changed the World" I was moved to purchase his other books including "Gunning for God." When someone has been teaching and touring colleges around the world for so many years as he has, giving this information as discourses to so many college youth that typically asked him questions afterwards, Prof Lennox' thoughts are better than "peer reviewed", they are "anti-peer reviewed"! Prof Lennox debated many including Dawkins, Hitchens and many big name scientists, his thinking has been refined with the strongest opposition and holds up all the better for it. His research and what he writes in his book can be read with utmost confidence as far as accuracy is concerned.

He finds most youth doesn't give true scientific unbiased consideration toward the reality of God, especially looking at both sides of the scientific coin. He notes that there are many most-educated scientists that do believe in God and even the Bible. He explains how God and science are most certainly compatible. He delves into distinguishing between Christendom and true followers of the peace-promoting Messiah; Is God really as bad as some portray him, and how miracles don't break scientific laws but can actually utilize them. He presents an abundance of surprising and historical evidence to endorse the historicity of the Bible, Jesus and even his resurrection, many things I've not been aware of myself!

Prof Lennox is always polite, pointed and has something of interest in nearly every paragraph. The brief 240 page book is packed with a most clear, intellectual and scientific point of view. An excellent read for atheists and believers alike.
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59 of 69 people found the following review helpful By rossuk on October 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
I first met John Lennox through his two debates with Dawkins; he was OK but not brilliant, but I was surprised just how bad Dawkins arguments were. Then I got his book God's Undertaker which was excellent, in that book he deals with the science issues in the current debate with the New Atheists.

Then he published a short but stinging critique of Stephen Hawking's book (The Grand Design), who has now thrown his hat in with the New Atheists.

In this book Lennox also deals with the arguments of the New Atheists. It is based on his lectures/debates in the past few years. This book will be hated by the New Atheists and loved by Theists. The New Atheists have very loud mouths; but very poor arguments. Lennox continues to dissect their arguments in this book. Chapter headings are:

1. Are God and faith enemies of reason and science?
2. Is religion poisonous?
3. Is Atheism poisonous?
4. Can we be good without God?
5. Is the God of the bible a despot?
6. Is the atonement morally repellent?
7. Are miracles pure fantasy?
8. Did Jesus rise from the dead?
9. Final reflections.

The book is also endorsed by Alvin Plantinga, a leading Christian philosopher.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jason Harris on September 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book addresses a particular subset of Atheists--the self-styled New Atheists such as Dawkins, Harris, Hitchens, and Hawking. Lennon, an Oxford Mathematician, is generally quite methodical in his critique of the New Atheism, though it would be a mistake to conclude that he does not play to win. He points out that what makes the New Atheists new is not their arguments, but rather their aggression which he points out in Hitchens' statement "Religion poisons everything." In other words, the New Atheists are not content to deny the existence of God; rather, they intend to demonstrate that religion is not only a force for evil, but is the primary source of evil in the world.

Lennox sets a foundation for the discussion by shooting down some popular--and childish--misconceptions about how theists approach science and reason. He then goes on to address the idea that religion is poisonous, demonstrating that this generalisation steps well beyond the limits of the reasonable. He then turns the tables by asking the question "Is Atheism poisonous?" A brief discussion of Hitler, Stalin, and Lenin is followed by an attempt to demonstrate the dogmatic fundamentalism of the New Atheism, for instance quoting Sam Harris: "Some propositions are so dangerous that it may even be ethical to kill people for believing them." He goes on to address the issue of morality, the nature of God, and miracles. Lennox closes the book with a chapter on the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead asking questions about history that no reasonable person can ignore and that the New Atheists can't answer.

THE UPS

First, this book is well written, logically sound, and profoundly credible.
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