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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Former Marine Fighter Pilot Saves Chrysler
In 1991 I spoke with Mr. Lutz about a Marine Corps-related matter. After connecting through a shared military location (he had flown into the Korean airfield "K-16" during his active duty tour and I was stationed there for a year just prior to the '88 Olympics), Mr. Lutz told me in a straight-forward manner how Chrysler was coming back. He mentioned the...
Published on October 30, 1999 by James W. Hodges (j.shodges@ero...

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven, but highly relevant
Part autobiography and part business advice. People who read this book for the 7 laws will get their money's worth. Although that particular section accounts for 25 or 30% of the book, Lutz explains his positions with exceptional clarity and detail. His anecdotes and examples are right on the money. When he goes beyond the business world and into social commentary, he...
Published on June 26, 2001 by Aaron Smith


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Former Marine Fighter Pilot Saves Chrysler, October 30, 1999
This review is from: Guts: The Seven Laws of Business That Made Chrysler the World's Hottest Car Company (Paperback)
In 1991 I spoke with Mr. Lutz about a Marine Corps-related matter. After connecting through a shared military location (he had flown into the Korean airfield "K-16" during his active duty tour and I was stationed there for a year just prior to the '88 Olympics), Mr. Lutz told me in a straight-forward manner how Chrysler was coming back. He mentioned the "LH" frame (new to me) and how it would a part of the overall come back. Mr. Lutz came across as easy going, friendly, down to earth, but strong and confident. This superb book accurately reinforces my personal observations. As I was referring to him as "sir," he said that it felt funny having a colonel call him "sir." I responded that his position placed him in the general officer ranks. He chuckled. A few months later, we talked again and he courteously asked, "this is Bob Lutz, do you have some time to talk?" For crying out loud, I was looking for a post- military job, and this is the Vice-Chairman of Chrysler asking me if I've got a minute to chat. . .this is how he is. Recommend that business students read and study "Guts" very, very closely. This is the real world! Mr. Lutz gives honest examples and describes what did not work, as well as what did. Bob Lutz is the prototype of the American hero and entrepreneur. READ THIS BOOK! A direct order!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a must-read for every executive!, July 17, 1999
By A Customer
Robert Lutz tells of his almost embarassing past as the oldest person in high school (He graduated at age 22!), and of his success at Chrysler as well as Ford of Europe and BMW. But the real point of this book is to point out what's wrong with American business and modern society and how to fix the problems. Unlike most other books of it's type, GUTS really does provide sensible solutions not from an industry observer, but from an insider who knows how it all works. Written in a humourous and upbeat tone, GUTS should be required reading for all Fortune 500 executives.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven, but highly relevant, June 26, 2001
Part autobiography and part business advice. People who read this book for the 7 laws will get their money's worth. Although that particular section accounts for 25 or 30% of the book, Lutz explains his positions with exceptional clarity and detail. His anecdotes and examples are right on the money. When he goes beyond the business world and into social commentary, he starts sounding a bit out of touch, although it is nice to hear a corporate type who takes a stand at the risk of offending.
Where the book misses is in the spotty autobiography. Lutz's essay and the forward by Bob Eaton make much of the fact that he is a vegetarian, an ex-marine, Berkley alum and former reprobate who did not finish high school till age 22, yet went on to success in every arena in his life thereafter, but then he doesn't bother to explain much about his past, except the Marine part. As long as he takes the time to prescribe remedies to the state of the modern educational and legal systems, the apparently disparate aspects of his life deserve philosophical explanations, too.
Those who buy books just to peruse the laws promised in the title (perhaps Lutz wrote this book for such people) will get their money's worth. Those with the discipline to read a whole book will want a separate biography.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THIS COUNTRY NEEDS MORE MEN LIKE BOB LUTZ, January 22, 1999
By A Customer
As a business major, I am constantly studying the theoretical side of business. It was quite refreshing to read about a guy who challenges some of the old corporate attitudes and pushes for positive change within businesses. "The customer isn't always right," and "disruptive people are an asset," are a couple of his laws which provoked thought and inspiration which contradict the old maxims taught in the business world.
I also enjoyed reading about his philosophies regarding where our country's youth is heading, education in America, America as an international player, and the future of business. A definite great read for anybody involved in business or life in general.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A refreshing view of what it takes to be a leader, August 23, 2001
By 
Ross Pollack (Columbia, SC United States) - See all my reviews
What inspired me to buy this book was a review of it on television which included the title of one of the chapters: "The Customer Isn't Always Right." With a CEO who thinks like that, you know it has to be a good read. Lutz explains his common sense approach to leadership in business, which could apply to any field outside of business as well. A must-buy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must-Read!, April 30, 2001
Former Chrysler president and vice-chairman Robert A. Lutz proves that sometimes a corporate leader can write a terrific book (it just doesn't happen very often). If Lutz ever decides to get out of the corporate arena entirely, he would make a fabulous comedian. Known as a colorful and brilliant leader ever since he turned Chrysler around in the early `90s, he shares the ideas that saved the company as well as others he believes could help any organization succeed. Lutz is direct, holds nothing back and points out the lunacy behind most corporate decisions. We [...] think of him as the Dennis Miller of corporate honchos. He fills his how-to book with plenty of examples from his Chrysler days, making it a provocative page-turner that any businessperson can relish.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Important Man in the Last Twenty Five Years of Cars, October 25, 1998
By A Customer
As an automotive broadcaster and historian it was my pleasure to write the review of Bob Lutz's book for the October issue of "Car and Driver" magazine. While most people may not be aware of Mr. Lutz's contributions to the industry, those inside of the car business know he has been the most influential individual the car business has offered us in the past twenty five years. In addition, while other's have published their books of "business wisdown" that were full of abstract theories on how to succeed, what Bob Lutz gives the reader to chapter after chapter of his common sense approach to business. Fortunately Lutz's "Rules of Business" don't apply only to the automobile industry. They would apply to any company trying to move themselves forward. In a perfect world every company in America, whether small or large, would buy a copy of Mr. Lutz's book and distribute it to every employee. It is the finest book on corporate wisdown since Robert Townsend's "Up the Organization" over 25 years ago. It is a shame that a talent like Bob Lutz has retired. The automobile industry will miss him and his talents tremendously. Ed Wallace 570 KLIF AM/Car and Driver/Fox News-Dallas/insideautomotive.com
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Guts" is not just another book about the auto industry., October 13, 1998
It's been a long time since I have had an overwhelming desire to pick up a yellow marker and highlight paragraph after paragraph in a new book. As I finished the first chapter in "Guts, the Seven Laws of Business that Made Chrysler the World's Hottest Car Company," by Robert A. Lutz, I realized that this was going to be one of those books. Lutz shares his insights in an imaginative way that challenges the reader to ponder the author's comments long after the book has been put aside. This is NOT just a book about the automobile industry; it is a book about common sense--both in business and in life. "Lutz's Laws" can be adapted to every type of business, and will be of enormous help to business owners in every field. I know I will be referring to my marked-up copy for many years to come. Please be sure to put your name in this book, because you will want to share it with your friends and business associates...and they, in turn, will need to share it with their co-workers and friends. Better yet, it will be the perfect holiday gift for your boss, co-workers, and friends in the business world.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful account of Lutz's views on business and Chrysler., September 28, 1998
By A Customer
Robert A. Lutz must be somewhat of an icon in current American automotive business culture. He's the man largely credited with transforming Chrysler from a stodgy, near-bankrupt company with boring products to Forbes Magazine's Company of the Year, the most profitable car company in America, with exciting products ranging from the Dodge Viper all-American sports car to the European-style rebirth of the letter car, the Chrysler 300M.
Lutz's personality shines through the pages of the book. He's at once provocative and engaging, while at the same time proposing rules of varying degrees of authority. Lutz extolls the value of "change agents", sometimes disruptive people within organizations who question the status quo in a more or less incessant striving for improvement.
He tempers his enthusiasm for change with some sobering advice - dress neat, be on time, don't be disruptive just to be negative all the time, and above all, don't waste. He sprinkles his writing frequently with war-stories from his years at Ford, Chrysler, and other automotive companies. Sometimes the chapters seem a bit contradictory - for example, how can he advocate teamwork and at the same time say, "teamwork isn't always good". But he skillfully dissects the yin and yang of business, illustrating the fine edge one must often walk to avoid the pitfalls of extreme positions to either side.
Sometimes his wording is a little awkward, his sentences a little run-on, and his overuse of parenthetical asides (what's wrong with the comma, anyway) can be distracting. But overall the book is a quick and revealing read. Those who can pick through the shock items may even be able to use the book better to devise a working plan for success, whether it be in a personal project or as an employee of a stodgy Fortune 500 company.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Guts-Bob Lutz, February 23, 2012
I read the "Revised Version"(Blue cover,no Viper-I can't stand Vipers anyhow.)the one where he has a new Epilogue I believe,The book is well written and amusingly funny yet True and Sad because What Mr.Lutz points out is that A lot of companies Want "Yes Men". There is a need for Disruptive People(depending how disruptive they are,of course.)in Organizations,this book covers up to his Experience in 2003(from his Book 1998,and now there is Car Guys Vs Bean Counters.)His thoughts on the Viper and what He believes Invigorated Chrysler,although I did not like his comments on the Viper's competition:Corvette(A Truck? or truck like Vehicle,something to that effect.)I find his thoughts and ideas very interesting even though he himself says he is "moderate". and I love his CarGuy Personality and not some treehugger. His views on current Education that has indeed failed society with Feel Goody-ness and everyone is special which is churning out People who will get a reality check in the real world.A Highly recommended Read.
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