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114 of 116 people found the following review helpful
on May 30, 2010
This is a duel review for two products that I bought with the idea that they would be used together and they did this well. The products are the Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1.5 Terabyte (1.5TB) SATA/300 7200RPM 32MB Hard Drive and the SATA to PATA/IDE Hard Drive Interface Adapter. I hope this will help somebody who has the same problem that I had. I have a Dell Precision WorkStation 350 computer that had a 40GB IDE hard drive. I wanted to upgrade to a larger drive and settled on the 1.5 TB Seagate Barracuda 7200.11, which is SATA II. My old computer does not have a SATA connection so I bought the PATA to SATA adapter with the idea that I would plug the adapter into the hard drive and attach it to my external IDE hard drive case (cage) then plug it into the USB port. I had to leave the Seagate drive outside the case and only attach the electrical connections since the adapter is too large to fit into the cage with the hard drive, as expected. I then used the windows Computer Manager (right click My Computer to open then click disk mangement under storage) to initialize the drive and format it. After this, the computer recognized the drive when I opened My Computer. I used the Seagate Disk Wizard to clone my old IDE hard drive onto the new SATA II drive. This worked great. I then checked the Seagate drive and all my data, including the operating system (XP Service Pack 3), was on the Seagate. So far so good. I then turned off the computer and swapped hard drives. That is I removed the old IDE drive completely and replaced it with the Seagate SATA II and adapter. I then reassembled my computer, crossed my fingers and turned it on. To my suprise and delight, the computer came on and the operating system started up and ran flawlessly with the Seagate SATA II drive running Windows XP Sevice pack 3 and the computer recognized the drive as having 1.5 TB. After several hours, I shut down the computer and tried to restart it and this is where things went bad. The BIOS started then I got the error message "\windows\system32\config\system file missing or corrupt". I could get no further than this error message no mater what I tried. I finally decided to start over, put the drives back into the original positions and reclone the old drive back onto the new drive. I swapped the drives after the procedure and again the computer worked perfectly with the cloned data on the Seagate that was now running in my old computer. Then I shut the computer off and tried to restart it and got the same error message "\windows\system32\config\system file missing or corrupt" again.

The fix. After many hours of research and trying to fix the problem it came down to one simple thing. The old computer of course had an old BIOS, which limited the hard drive capacity to 137GB so even though the old BIOS recognized the SATA II hard drive, it could not use it after a shut down. My old BIOS was version AO1 and after an up grade to version AO2, the computer recognized the new Seagate SATA II drive perfectly, even after many shut down/restart cycles.

Even though I had some problems with the installation (not the fault of either product), I give both products top ratings since they both work well together. The only draw backs are that the PATA to SATA adapter is somewhat bulky and the connection to the drive is not very tight although it is an adequate fit. I have had no problems with the Seagate Drive.
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102 of 107 people found the following review helpful
on January 12, 2010
I have an old PC (Approximately 7 years old). I wanted to upgrade to an SATA drive, but this old PC did not have the ability to accept SATA drives. I purchased another type of adapter. It was the "Ide To Sata Drive Motherboard by StarTech". That adapter was supposed to convert the EIDE bus on the motherboard to SATA but the system could not recognize the drive.

I was pleasantly surprised when I received this "SATA to PATA/IDE Hard Drive Interface Adapter" when I attached it to the SATA drive, plugged the ribbon cable into it, and the PC recognized the drive and I was up and running.

The description is misleading and I don't want to be a "JERK" either. However, but by looking at the photograph of this item, you can plainly tell that it will not convert in reverse, as the other reviewer states.

I would recommend this adapter.
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57 of 61 people found the following review helpful
on June 23, 2010
As others have stated this is a bit on the bulky side. It is designed to go behind a 3.5" drive. I personally used this behind a 2.5" drive I pulled out of a broken laptop. Because of its size I currently can only use one 2.5" drive in the bay.

Aside from the size issue. The adapter works just fine with an inconvient quirk. It does need to be on position 0 of the IDE cable, which will make it impossible to hook up as a slave to your boot drive.

Overall I give it 3 stars. It works as stated, just bulky and needs to be on position 0.

I dont know how the people could think that this could go from IDE to SATA when it clearly states SATA to IDE.

Pros:
Simple to put in, no extra wires

Cons:
Bulky (not suitable for 2.5" drives)
Must be on position 0 (cant use on slave drive behind Master Boot Drive)

*edit/update*
It has been nearly 2 years since I installed this and it still works. In that time though it seems they have come out with a few revisions to this particular adapter. My review is based on the version without the jumper(s).
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on February 3, 2010
This product worked easily and with no bugs or real problems. I used it to install a new SATA drive (as the master -- haven't tested this on a secondary drive) in an old computer. After hooking it up and powering on, the BIOS recognized the new drive right away.

My only complaint is that this is a bulky adapter that's designed to mount directly to the drive. My case has a weird arrangement for the hard drive enclosure, and this adapter made it impossible to put my drive back where it should go! I ended up jury-rigging the drive enclosure to move it to a new mounting point. (And as the product info says, don't even *think* about trying to fit this into an external drive case!)

Great product, but be aware that it plugs directly into the SATA ports on your hard drive and is a bit bulky -- if you've got a compact case where everything is crammed together, that could be an issue.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2010
I was going to upgrade my old motherboard so I could use the new larger SATA drives. I have an old 2002 computer with a 120GB 7200 rpm WD PATA drive that runs fine. I just brought this adapter and a Western Digital 1 TB Caviar Green SATA Intellipower 32 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Desktop Hard Drive WD10EADS [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging](now obsolete after buying it 2 weeks ago) instead. The EADS drive turned out to be good for XP users because WD uses a new "Advance Format" for the new drives and XP users with 2 partitions need to run a WD Align program.

The only issue I had was the adapter's power socket is a little tight making it difficult to plug in the power connector while holding the fragile adapter PCB. Otherwise it works great.

Notes:
1) Western Digital offers free imaging software to clone the old drive onto a new WD drive. Their Acronis True Image WD Edition copied my C: and D: partitions in the same proportions onto my new drive. Seagate offers similar S/W for their drives.

2) When cloning, I had to put the new drive on the Secondary Master (middle connector on 40-pin IDE cable) because the adapter works only as a Master, as mentioned by a previous reviewer. The newly cloned drive then goes on the end connector of the 80-pin EIDE cable on the Primary Master.

3) While doing this upgrade, the IDE controller went into PIO mode instead of Ultra DMA Mode which made the system run really slow. I found out my old device on the Primary Slave connector was causing CRC errors which forced the Master into PIO mode. I remove the Slave device and rebooted allowing XP to reset the DMA mode. The new 1TB drive is now running in Ultra Mode 6.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on October 22, 2011
I have a 7 year old Compaq Presario desktop running Windows XP (fully updated). My computer is set up to work with IDE drives, not SATA. I purchased this adapter for a Western Digital(WD) one Terabyte SATA hard drive. The adapter and new hard drive work great! I couldn't be happier!

Unlike other authors in this forum, my new WD hard drive works WITH my old 80GB hard drive. I didn't have to use one or the other. I'm using both. My origial hard drive for everyday computing and my new WD drive for back up. It is my firm belief that the other people who failed to get their SATA drives to work WITH their old hard drives failed to properly complete the entire installation process.

You can't just install the new drive in your case, you must also FORMAT it. If you just install the new hard drive, the computer will recognize it, but won't allow you to access it. You must Format the new drive for it to work in harmony with your old drive.

Here's what I did after installing the new hard drive into my computer's case:

1. Go into CONTROL PANEL and then left click ADD HARDWARE. This is where you're going to tell Windows that you have a new hard drive you'd like it to recognize. Follow the on screen instructions to add the new drive. When finished, Windows should tell you that the new hard drive has been recognized (the drivers have been installed).

2. Go to CONTROL PANEL again and then left click on the SYSTEMS icon. Choose the HARDWARE tab. Select DEVICE MANAGER and then look for DISK DRIVES. Double click on DISK DRIVES. A list of all the drives currectly active on your system should be displayed. Look for your new drive and click it on. A message should be displayed saying your device is working properly. If you don't see that message or you don't see your new hard drive listed under DISK DRIVES, you have problems with your computer recognizing the new drive. You'll have to seek help elsewhere.

Even though Windows says that the new hard drive is working properly, you'll notice that you will still be unable to access it. Go to MY COMPUTER and you'll notice that there are no icons for your new drive. Until you complete this last step, your drive will be useless.

3. VERY IMPORTANT: RIGHT CLICK (not left click)MY COMPUTER. Then, LEFT click MANAGE and then DISK MANAGEMENT. You should see your new drive shown in the lower righthand window. Move your cursor into the white space of your new hard drive located in the lower right corner of the screen. Your cursor should be located in the white space which represents the empty space of your new hard drive. RIGHT CLICK while in that space. A window should pop up giving you several options. Choose FORMAT and follow the on screen instructions. Don't change the defaults shown unless you know what your doing. Then, let the computer perform its magic.

First, I created a 100MB partition just to see if it would work. When I achieved success, I then created a second partition on the same drive using the maximum partition size allowed, 931.4GB for my one Terabyte drive. Formatting the new hard drive with the 931.4GB partition took over 2-and-a-half hours to complete. So, be patient. Windows will let you know if the formatting process was completed correctly.

If Windows say everything is fine, test out the new drive for yourself. Go to MY COMPUTER. You should see two new drive icons (if you created two partitions like I did). My new drive icons are "F" & "K". Yours might be different. You are now done and ready to fill your new drive.

I hope you are as successful with your new hard drive as I was with mine. I didn't want to give up my old hard drive, and as I discovered, I didn't have too. I hope you didn't have to as well!

Good Luck!

Mark
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 25, 2011
The adapter worked with my SATA 2.5" hard drive that i wanted to connect to my old Dell desktop (which has an IDE interface). But there are some limitations as follows:
1) It appears that this adapter cannot be used to connect as a slave. Following the instructions to remove the pin on the adapter to set it as slave, my primary drive failed to boot with the adapter and SATA hard drive attached as slave.
2) The SATA hard drive and adapter must be connected (as master) to the first connector on the IDE cable with no other drives attached. My computer did not boot when I added another IDE slave hard drive on the same cable.
3) Also, the SATA hard drive's data transfer rate dropped when attached to this adapter on the IDE interface. Average data transfer rate was lower than when connected to an actual SATA connection. I was able to get an average of 30MB/s using this adapter with a 2.5", 7200 rpm SATA hard drive. (Tested using HDtune diagnostic software).

Conclusion:
If you plan on using only one SATA hard drive as master on an old Dell desktop computer, then this adapter should work.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2010
With IDE hard drives getting more difficult to find I thought of trying a Seagate 320 GB SATA drive but without a controller card. There's no cheaper way (Mac compatible PCI controller cards cost as much, if not more than SATA drives) to use newer higher capacity drives. At first I was hesitant because of my experience with Mac Quicksilver's motherboard recognizing HDs to 128 GB. With the Mirror Drive the 320 SATA drive was recognized to full capacity instantly. I use the new drive as backup together with an older 160 GB IDE drive as the main drive. The adapter lengthens the dimensions of the SATA drive so I placed it into one of spare drive bays beneath the DVD burner, using the other controller. Other Mac upgraders told me OS X 10.4/5 will not recognize onboard Western Digital HDs so I have no experience with them except as external USB drives.
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2011
Before installing SATA Serial ATA Hard Drive/CD/DVD-ROM to PATA/IDE Interface Convert Adapter please view the video at [...]

Note:You can only use this product on the primary end of your data cable. You
must disconnect the slave end. That means you can only use one drive on the
cable. If you must have two drives on the data cable this will not work for
you. It caused my system to crash and it relabeled all my drives except for
the C drive. Watch VIDEO it will explain this.

NOTE: This VIDEO LINK should be included with the purchase of product.

Thanks Jim
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on August 22, 2010
I tried 2 of them on 2 different PCs with 2 different high capacity drives. The results are the same:

1) competing IDE to SATA converter gives good speed:
magic:~# hdparm -t /dev/hdb

/dev/hdb:
Timing buffered disk reads: 118 MB in 3.04 seconds = 38.78 MB/sec

2) This converter gives very slow speeds in PIO 5 mode:
magic:~# hdparm -p 5 /dev/hdc

/dev/hdc:
attempting to set PIO mode to 5
magic:~# hdparm -t /dev/hdc

/dev/hdc:
Timing buffered disk reads: 8 MB in 3.32 seconds = 2.41 MB/sec

3) When I enable DMA, it's slightly faster
magic:~# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdc

/dev/hdc:
setting using_dma to 1 (on)
using_dma = 1 (on)
magic:~# hdparm -t /dev/hdc

/dev/hdc:
Timing buffered disk reads: 44 MB in 3.04 seconds = 14.46 MB/sec

But DMA mode, as slow as it is, is also unstable on both my machines and I have to turn it off:
kernel: hdc: dma_timer_expiry: dma status == 0x21
kernel: hdc: DMA timeout error
kernel: hdc: dma timeout error: status=0xd0 { Busy }
kernel: ide: failed opcode was: unknown
kernel: hdc: DMA disabled
kernel: ide1: reset: success

I get the same exact errors with 2 of those adapters on 2 different PCs, so it's not a one off
problem, a bad machine, or a bad cable.
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