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HTML5: Up and Running Paperback – August 24, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0596806026 ISBN-10: 0596806027 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (August 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596806027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596806026
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Dive into the Future of Web Development

About the Author

Mark Pilgrim works as a developer advocate for Google, specializing inopen source and open standards. You may remember him from such classics as Greasemonkey Hacks (O'Reilly), Dive Into Python (Apress), and Dive Into Python 3 (APress). He lives in North Carolina with his wife, two boys, and a big slobbery dog.


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Customer Reviews

If you're creating HTML for web sites then I recommend this book.
David Cross
Mark Pilgrim's writing style is well-researched, organized, pragmatic, and easy on the eyes.
R. Hettinger
No examples, no advise on where to use them, nothing on browser support.
Andor Admiraal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

234 of 241 people found the following review helpful By Andor Admiraal on September 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
I must say: I enjoyed going through this book. It is written in an opinionated and slightly irreverent style, so I found it a mildly amusing read.

That being said: why do people buy a book on HTML5? Some would like to have a good in-depth reference on the ins and outs of the new language. Well now - that's not this book. Others might be new to web development and think learning HTML5 would be a good starting point. While they are right that HTML (5 or 4) is the place to start, this book surely isn't.

There's some depth when it comes to background, but much less when it comes to HTML5 itself or how to use it. True, the <canvas> tag and geolocation are covered pretty much in detail, but the author made some hard to defend choices in spending his paper estate.

HTML5 gives us no more than a handful of new tags, still some of those (<mark> and <section>, for example) are simply mentioned once and that's that. No examples, no advise on where to use them, nothing on browser support. Yet the book takes five pages at the start to tell the story of how the img-tag came into being some 15 years ago. Again, mildly amusing, but probably not the reason you are thinking of buying this book.

Another example: there are 10 pages with a primer on audio and video codecs, plus another 19 (!) detailed pages (with lots of screen shots) on how to use a number of specific and probably soon outdated software tools to encode video for the web. All fine for those who are completely new to video encoding and believe a book on HTML5 should be the starting point for that.
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94 of 103 people found the following review helpful By Greg Bulmash on August 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
In the 1970s, ABC's "Schoolhouse Rock" took the tedious process of making a law and distilled it down into a 3-minute song that many of us can at least sing the first few bars from ("I'm just a bill, yes I'm only a bill, and I'm sitting here on Capitol Hill..."). Marc Pilgrim takes a different approach with the first chapter of this book, distilling the early history of HTML into fourteen eye-glazing pages. But if you can muddle through the initial proposal and discussion of the IMG tag, you get to Pilgrim's primary take-away of the chapter: HTML is not so much a thing, but a collection of things.

This is good, because the history of HTML has not been a smooth, step-by-step process. Different releases of different browsers have adopted different features of different specs at different times. I can personally recall rejoicing, back in the 90s, when both IE and Netscape finally implemented support for HTML tables. So it's no wonder that the second chapter dives into methods for detecting whether or not a user's browser supports certain HTML5 features.

If the first chapter was boring, the second is discouraging. First he shows how to check if Canvas is even supported. But once that's determined, you have to check if all the features of Canvas are supported. Moving on to the Video tag, even when that is supported, video format support varies across browsers. Basically, in these early days of HTML 5 support, it's like touring the United States early in the 20th century. Flush toilets and electric lights took longer to come to some areas than others.

After the third chapter started breaking down some of the new tags and how they affect the DOM, my eyes were good and glazed. This book is more discussion than documentation.
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Coder Guitarist on August 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book feels like it was rushed to try to be the first HTML5 book published, the others I have ordered have all been pushed back several times as the specs/APIs evolve, this book was released as-is and it sure feels it. The 'Complete Examples' throughout the book are a mess and require considerable more work to be used as complete examples, they are at best snippets which illustrate very little. Several of the topics I was most interested in reading about were dealt with sparsely (some just in a single paragraph). In short, for an O'Reilley book I am quite disappointed.
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30 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Brett Merkey on August 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
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The subject of the book is of special interest to those of us making a living from our ability to understand and implement aspects of Web technology. HTML 5 is not our present but there are plenty of very smart people working diligently to make it our future.

This "up and running" series book has lots of code samples but, really, don't pick the book up for that reason. This is a book that does the right thing -- it communicates the *context* of changing Web markup. The author concentrates on the multitude of "WHY's" behind HTML 5. It is an effective advocacy work. Intelligent advocacy is precisely what is needed at this juncture.

This book takes us through a re-examination of Web markup as we know it. We get a chance to inspect things from a different angle not quite visible in our normal work day. That is why Pilgrim's book has value way beyond the code snippets. Daily practice is yet to come. Understanding can begin right now.
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