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HUSTLE: MYTH, LIFE AND LIES OF PETE ROSE: Darryl Strawberry and the Boys of Crenshaw Paperback – January 15, 1992

11 customer reviews

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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Theodore Dreiser would have loved this story, but he couldn't have written it nearly so well as Michael Sokolove....[He] is a natural literary stylist, with the gifts of a social historian....This is a book for all seasons, not just summer."
-- The New York Times Book Review

"A first-class work of sound reporting and inescapable conclusions."
-- Roger Angell

"Anyone interested in the true story should read Michael Sokolove's...book on Rose. It's all there, the long gambling history, the sordid acquaintances, the relentless pursuit of gambling opportunities and, of course, the requisite obligations to the Mob."
-- Bob Ryan, The Boston Globe --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

"Theodore Dreiser would have loved this story, but he couldn't have written it nearly so well as Michael Sokolove....[He] is a natural literary stylist, with the gifts of a social historian....This is a book for all seasons, not just summer."

-- The New York Times Book Review

"A first-class work of sound reporting and inescapable conclusions."

-- Roger Angell

"Anyone interested in the true story should read Michael Sokolove's...book on Rose. It's all there, the long gambling history, the sordid acquaintances, the relentless pursuit of gambling opportunities and, of course, the requisite obligations to the Mob."

-- Bob Ryan, The Boston Globe --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (January 15, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671759701
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671759704
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,107,712 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By x on July 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
Sokolove's book is truly an excellent read. Although the title gives the connotation that the book is going to be a hatchet job on Pete Rose, the book is actually carefully researched and well written. I have been a Pete Rose fan for most of my life. I admired his determination and ability to play each game as though it were the seventh game of the World Series. (If we only had players like that today . . .) Sokolove does a great job at capturing the qualities that made him one of baseball's greatest players.
However, Pete Rose was also a shady character who loved having an entourage perform errands for him and tell him how great he was. Pete Rose, as a beloved baseball star, felt that he was above the rest of society and eventually this caught up to him in 1989-1990. Sokolove delves deeply into the character flaws of Rose that ultimately led to his exile from baseball and imprisonment for tax fraud. What is particularly interesting about Sokolove's book is how he deals with the careful way Rose constructed his own mythology by using the press to his advantage. In sum, this book is the story of a great player and flawed personality who learned (I hope) the hard way that even if you have 4256 hits in Major League Baseball, you can still end up like Oedipus in Colonus.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 15, 1997
Format: Board book
This is a well written, thoroughly researched biography. A great many former teammates and friends of Pete Rose were interviewed for the book. He is portrayed in both his positive and negative aspects. The conclusions drawn at the end seem very solid and built on a good foundation.

I would recommend this book to any base ball fan and especially and Cincinnati Reds fan. I learned a good amount not only about Pete Rose but also about baseball during the 1960's - 1980's and the social history of the city of Cincinnati.

While the book may seem like an attack on Rose at first glance it really is probably one of the most well balanced biographys I've ever read. Probably the most realistic book about Rose available.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By G. Harrah on August 13, 2005
Format: Board book
Anyone who grew up a Reds fan in the 70's will find this book disturbing and depressing, to say the least.

No one should feel sorry for Pete Rose, he brought his troubles all on himself. What is depressing are the number of enablers he had around him beginning with Major League Baseball itself! Pete's problems could have been confronted as early as 1970 but since he put "fannies in the seats" both the Reds and the commisioners office chose to look the other way.

I reccomend this book not just as a biography but also a study of self destructive behavior and enabling an addict.

After you're finished find something humorous to read, you'll need it.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John Wilharm on October 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book nicely represents the seedy side of Pete Rose - a man with no real friends and very few principles. Sokolove portrays Rose as being only out for himself, illustrated at its peek in his chase for Cobb's record. It was interesting to read how many of his contemporaries felt Rose looked foolish chasing the record with such diminished skills.

What may be even sadder is how the Commissioners' office looked the other way for so many years as his gambling problem grew worse. Bowie Kuhn really does not come out looking really strong in his attempt to "clean up" baseball, especially after the drug scandals of the late 70s. Unfortunately, his office's refusal to seriously confront Rose in the 70s led Rose to believe that he was beyond the rules. And, as usually occurs, this led to the crash and destruction of a supposed American hero - finally exposed for his lies and selfishness. The truth must really hurt for his fans in Cincinnati, who praised and adored him for so many years. Somewhere, Ray Fosse is smiling right now.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. J. D. on November 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
A very well written book about Pete Rose. I had always been a fan of Pete's and wondered why people would critisize him so much for betting on baseball (when he would only bet for his team to win...), and now I understand. This book gives you a peek into Pete's life that no news reporter has ever been able to share with the public.

I am always critical of reporters but Michael Sokolove's reporting will make you step back and take another look at Pete Rose the man, and will make you wonder if he really cares about anybody but himself. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to any baseball/sports fan. I loved it so much that I bought another copy for my father for christmas this year.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Howard Wexler on December 14, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am no Reds fan and was only casually interested in Pete Rose before reading the book.

I thought the author was remarkably evenhanded in writing about Rose. The book is soup-to-nuts, it talks about Rose's parents in great depth. The author did not have access to Rose's children, nor that many teammates from the Reds. But he spoke to just about everybody else.

This book is NOT a hatchet job. Sokolove comes out strongly for Rose's enshrinement in Coopertwon, but wants him banned permanently from the game. He makes a convincing point that the "character" issue that gets cited by Rose's detractors is vague and meaningless and should NOT be used to keep Rose out of Cooperstown.

He does not speculate why Rose seems so obsessed about Coopertwon, though.

He also comes up with some great points that as a player, Rose was quite overrated. But he also gives Rose credit in many ways. Rose was friendly to most sportswriters for selfish purposes but also for other reasons.

Bottom line, Rose comes across as a nuanced character in this book, not a sterotype. That is quite an accomplishment.
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