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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens Personal Workbook Paperback – March 2, 2004


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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Sean Covey is Executive Vice President of Global Solutions and Partnerships for FranklinCovey and has led the development of most of FranklinCovey’s organizational offerings, including: Focus, Leadership, The 4 Disciplines of Execution, The Leader in Me, and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Sean oversees all of Franklin Covey’s International partnerships which cover over 140 countries.

Sean is also FranklinCovey’s Education Practice Leader and is devoted to transforming education around the globe through bringing leadership principles and skills to as many kids, educators, and schools as possible.

He is a New York Times bestselling author and has written several books, including The 6 Most Important Decisions You’ll Ever Make, The 7 Habits of Happy Kids, The 4 Disciplines of Execution, and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, which has been translated into 20 languages and sold over 5 million copies worldwide. He is a seasoned speaker to kids, teens, and adults and has appeared on numerous radio and TV shows.

Sean graduated with honors from BYU with a Bachelor’s degree in English and later earned his MBA from Harvard Business School.  As the starting quarterback for BYU, he led his team to two bowl games and was twice selected as the ESPN Most Valuable Player of the Game.

Born in Belfast Ireland, Sean’s favorite activities include going to movies, working out, hanging out with his kids, riding his dirt bike, and writing poor poetry.  Sean and his wife Rebecca live with their children in the Rocky Mountains. For more information on Sean, visit SeanCovey.com. Follow Sean on Twitter @Sean_Covey.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One: Get in the Habit, They Make You or Break You

What Exactly Are Habits?

Read pages 5-6 of the Teens book. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens are:

Habit 1: Be Proactive --

Take responsibility for your life.

Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind --

Define your mission and goals in life.

Habit 3: Put First Things First --

Prioritize, and do the most important things first.

Habit 4: Think Win-Win --

Have an everyone-can-win attitude.

Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood --

Listen to people sincerely.

Habit 6: Synergize --

Work together to achieve more.

Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw --

Renew yourself regularly.

We first make our habits, and then our habits make us.

-- John Dryden

Habits are things you do repeatedly. But most of the time you are hardly aware you do them. They're on autopilot. Depending on what they are, your habits will either make you or break you. You become what you repeatedly do. Luckily, you are stronger than your habits.

Let's look at some of the good habits you have in your life right now. (Good habits include things such as exercising regularly, being a loyal friend, or being on time.)

Think About Your Habits

Four of my really great habits are:

1.

2.

3.

4.

The reason I keep these habits in my life is:

The good results I get from having each good habit are: (For example: I have a habit of smiling at people I meet, and now people are friendlier to me.)

Habits aren't always positive. In fact, they can be good, bad, or just neutral. Some habits I have that are neutral (they're neither good nor bad -- they're just habits) are: (For example: I put on one sock and then a shoe, then the other sock and the other shoe.)

Now let's list some habits you're not so proud of. Complete the statements that follow:

Right now, my worst habits are:

The reason I have these bad habits is:

I've had these bad habits for (days, weeks, years?):

The bad results I get from having these bad habits are: (For example: I am late to school, which means I miss class discussion and get demerits toward my citizenship grade.)

From my list of bad habits above, the one habit I would like to change the most is:

Change the Bad to Good

On the table below, fill in the habits that you named above. Keep this table handy during the upcoming week and use it as a tool to help you remember to change your bad habits to good ones.

Bad Habit I Want to Change/ Good Habit I Want to Replace it With

In School:

1.

2.

3.

With My Family:

1.

2.

3.

With My Friends:

1.

2.

3.

Other:

1.

2.

3.

A cool thing about the 7 Habits is how they build on each other. It's a progression -- just like learning arithmetic before calculus, learning the alphabet before learning to spell, or building a solid foundation before building a 150-story building. Trees grow this way, too; they put down solid roots before the trunk, branches, or leaves begin to grow.

Paradigms and Principles: What You See Is What You Get

So What's a Paradigm?

A paradigm is the way you see something -- your point of view, frame of reference, or belief. As you may have noticed, sometimes your paradigms can be accurate, way off the mark, wrong, or incomplete.

Did you know that from medieval times until the late 1800s doctors believed that a sick person had diseased blood? Doctors would "bleed" a person of the blood until they believed that they had drained the "diseased blood." This is, in fact, what killed George Washington, not the sore throat and fever he was suffering from.

We now know about germs and that they can be in different parts of the body and in different forms. So now we treat illnesses with a different form of healing -- we no longer "bleed" a patient. That was an inaccurate and an incomplete way of looking at healing.

Paradigms are like glasses. When you have incomplete paradigms about yourself or life in general, it's like wearing glasses with the wrong prescription. Those lenses affect how you see everything else.
-- Sean Covey

Top 10 All-Time Stupid Quotes:

10. "There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in their home."

Kenneth Olsen, President and Founder of Digital Equipment Corporation, in 1977

9. "Airplanes are interesting toys but of no military value."

Marshal Ferdinand Foch, French Military Strategist and
Future World War I Commander, in 1911

8. "[Man will never reach the moon] regardless of all future scientific advances."

Dr. Lee De Forest, Inventor of the Audion Tube and Father of Radio, on February 25, 1967

7. "[Television] won't be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months. People will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night."

Darryl F. Zanuck, Head of 20th Century Fox, in 1946

6. "We don't like their sound. Groups of guitars are on the way out."

Decca Records Rejecting the Beatles, in 1962

5. "For the majority of people, the use of tobacco has a beneficial effect."

Dr. Ian G. MacDonald, Los Angeles Surgeon, as Quoted in Newsweek, November 18, 1969

4. "This 'telephone' has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us."

Western Union Internal Memo, in 1876

3. "The earth is the center of the universe."

Ptolemy, The Great Egyptian Astronomer, in The Second Century

2. "Nothing of importance happened today."

Written by King George III of England on July 4, 1776

1. "Everything that can be invented has been invented."

Charles H. Duell, U.S. Commissioner of Patents, in 1899

What are some other paradigms from history that have proved to be inaccurate or incomplete? (For example: The world is flat.)

What kind of impact did these inaccurate paradigms from history have on the world?

• Paradigms of Self

A paradigm is the way you see something -- your point of view, frame of reference, or belief. So a paradigm of self is how you see yourself. No matter how you see yourself, you're probably right. If you think you are good at school, then you can be good at school. If you think you are no good at math, then you'll be no good at math. Paradigms of self can help or hinder you. Positive self-paradigms can bring out the best in you, while negative self-paradigms can limit you.

Some positive paradigms I have about myself are:

If someone were going to name something after me, it would be:

Some negative paradigms I have about myself are:

Paradigms that my parents or guardians, boss at work, or teachers at school might have about me are:

Their paradigms match mine (true or false):

Could they be right? How will I find out?

Self-Paradigm Assessment

Read the Paradigms of Self section on pages 13-16 of the Teens book. Now, evaluate how you see yourself by completing the assessment below.

Answer Yes or No

I am someone who cares about others' feelings.

I am good at school.

I am a kind person.

I am generally a happy person.

I am intelligent.

I am helpful.

I am a good athlete.

I am talented.

I am a go-getter.

I am a good member of my family.

I am a bad person.

I am lazy.

I am rarely happy.

I am not smart.

I am not good at anything.

I am not attractive.

Yes/No

I am not popular.

I am not a good friend.

I am not honest.

I am not reliable.


If you identified at least one negative self-paradigm during the assessment, complete the statement below:

One negative paradigm I would like to change is:

Paradigm Builder

If your self-paradigms are all wrong, what do you do?

Spend time with someone who believes in me and recognizes my potential. For me, this person is:

Drop friends who tear me down or believe I am like them. Friends I may need to drop are:

Try to see things from other people's points of view to shift the paradigm. A situation I need to see the other side of is:

• Paradigms of Others

In the Paradigms and Principles chapter you learn that you have paradigms not only about yourself but also about other people. And they can be way out of whack. Seeing things from a different point of view can help you understand why other people act the way they do. Sometimes you judge people without having all the facts.

Your paradigms are often incomplete, inaccurate, or completely messed up. Therefore, you shouldn't be quick to judge, label, or form rigid opinions of others, or of yourself, for that matter. From your limited point of view, you seldom see the whole picture, or have all the facts. You should open your mind and heart to new information, ideas, and points of view, and be willing to change your paradigms when it becomes clear that they're wrong.

Friendship with one's self is all important, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else in
the world.
-- Eleanor Roosevelt

Someone I may have judged inaccurately without having all the details is:

I will change that paradigm by: (Describe the actions you can take immediately.)

I can help others understand that their paradigms might be incomplete by: (Describe your actions or plan.)

• Paradigms of Life

Besides having paradigms about yourself and others, you have paradi...
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; copyright 2004 edition (March 2, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743250982
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743250986
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.7 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #84,430 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sean Covey is Sr. Vice President of Innovations and Products at FranklinCovey, a world renowned organization devoted to helping individuals and organizations achieve greatness. Sean graduated from BYU with a degree in English and later earned his M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. As the starting quarterback for BYU, he led his team to two bowl games and received numerous honors. He is the author of Fourth Down and Life to Go, and the international bestseller, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens which has sold over three million copies and is translated in over 15 languages. He is a popular speaker to youth and adult groups. Sean and his wife Rebecca live with their kids in the Rocky Mountains.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)
#71 in Books > Self-Help
#98 in Books > Teens
#71 in Books > Self-Help
#98 in Books > Teens

Customer Reviews

The exercises in the workbook were great.
THE SHOPPING LADY
I think it can help a teen get to know himself better and raise self expectations and make a plan to do what they are wanting to accomplish.
Fit Mama
I recommend this workbook to anyone who has a teen or works with teens (accompanying the "7 habits of highly effective teens").
Wilkstar Woods

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By E. Giebler on September 27, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I use this book in my clinical practice. It allows my clients to make positive changes in thier lives. It is user friendly and easy to use and understand.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By MVHop Enterprises on December 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I tried teaching my kids the 7 Habits from Steven Coveys book, but a lot of the focus was on business and adult issues. This really puts the subject matter in a new light for teens; and is definitely the best way to teach your teens the benefits of living a 7 Habits Life.
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Lee Say Keng on June 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
This workbook is basically an extension of the author's 'The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens'.

As it stands, it doesn't offer much new or exciting material.

From my personal experience, working with a workbook (based on Stephen Covey's main book & workbook in my case), coupled with the use of a personal journal, is often an uncharted journey into greater self-discovery. Having said that, I must say that this workbook is well-crafted by Sean Covey for use by teen readers.

Through the interactive exercises, worksheets & profiles, teen readers will find the workout experiences very useful in their understanding - & application - of proven time-tested tools for enhancing personal effectiveness.

Numerous field research reports over the years have consistently shown that the differential between successful teens & struggling teens lies in their habitual patterns. Successful teens have powerful habits.

The 7 Habits model is definitely a very good model.

[The 7 habits have their origins in some 200 years of published success literature. Both authors have done an extremely marvellous job in synthesising all those time-tested tools & ideas.]
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Katrice on June 4, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book for my son for his reading time at school. My son doesnt
really like to read much, but he told me he REALLY enjoyed this book. I sugguest this book for motivation for your teen.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Dwyer on May 20, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I use this in my teen class. I book is the same size as the textbook. Since the students write in in, I wish it were larger.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brenda J. Hargis on January 10, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a good workbook even for adults. It is a supplemental book that goes with the book in which our school is doing for a book study.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 4, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a really useful addition to the book if you can get your teen to use it. Takes the book and adds some great exercises.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By PurpleSong on November 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
I recommend it for younger adults (under 40?) and definitely for teens to help them build a good foundation for the rest of their lives. I work with teens and adults overcoming trauma and abuse, but have been facing my own challenge at work and figured since most teens worry about school, relationships and good grades this would remind me of the basic principles and importance of study and work ethic.

It did MORE than that, from discussing what deposits into and withdraws out of our Personal Bank Account (Self Care, "Me" Time)to our personal goals ("Controlling your Destiny or Someone Else Will,") to forming habits, confronting procrastination, and to the Relationship Bank Account (Think Win-Win, Seek First to Understand, then Be Understood, Taking the High Road and the Being Pro-Active Instead of Reacting.)

There is even a section on Rising Above Abuse, Becoming a Change Agent,(helping a friend) Stopping the Cycle and dealing pro-actively instead of reactively with bullying, a problem a lot of teens face.

Each exercise in this workbook does make reference to the main book, IE: "read pp. 59-61 of the Teens book." The exercises are simple enough to do without the main book, but still can get us thinking about how we handle our own situations.

My favorite part of the book?
The visual diagram of a tree, where we fill in each of the 7 Habits with habit #1 "Being Proactive and Taking Responsibility for Your Life" at the roots.

Sometimes we think we are "all set," and but life gets us side-tracked, or off track. I could have used this book as a teen. It's basic stuff, that I honestly think I had forgotten (or maybe never knew?) and this book served as a reminder.

There are other books out there, and other workbooks but sometimes they seem they might take too long and the exercises are more in-depth, like personal therapy, which is harder to do on your own. This book was much simpler, and still effective.
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