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Hacking For Dummies (For Dummies (Computers)) Paperback – October 30, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0470052358 ISBN-10: 047005235X Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: For Dummies (Computers)
  • Paperback: 408 pages
  • Publisher: For Dummies; 2 edition (October 30, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047005235X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470052358
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,699,855 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“…a good read…a price well-worth paying, because such works are invaluable…” (InfoSecurity News Magazine, August 2004)

“…an excellent aide…” (PC Home, August 2004)

“…should be of interest to both ethical and malicious hackers…” (Publishing News, 22nd March 2004) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Develop a plan to keep your information safe

Find out how to test your systems, plug the holes, and foil attackers

You'll find out how external hacker and rogue insider hacks happen, how to discover where your systems and network are weak, what you can do to strengthen your defenses, and how to prepare reports and recommendations to management.

Discover how to

  • Identify the different types of attacks
  • Create a plan for testing
  • Recognize vulnerabilities in your network
  • Prevent attacks by rogue insiders
  • Test applications, files, and databases
  • Plug security holes

More About the Author

I am an independent information security consultant, expert witness, author, and professional speaker with over 23 years of experience in IT - the last 17 of which I've dedicated to information security. Before starting Principle Logic in 2001, I served in various information technology and security roles for several healthcare, e-commerce, financial firms, educational institutions, and consulting organizations.

I have appeared on CNN television as an information security expert and have been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, Entrepreneur Magazine, Fortune Small Business, Women's Health and Inc. Magazine's technology site IncTechnology.com. My work has also been referenced by the PCI Council in their Data Security Standard Wireless Guidelines. I have presented at seminars and conferences over 200 times and have been a top-rated information security speaker at shows for Gartner, TechTarget, RSA, CSI, SecureWorld Expo and The IIA. I focus my speaking services on information security seminars, panels and keynoting IT and information security-related shows. Additionally, I've performed over three dozen webcasts for TechTarget, Ziff-Davis and other publishers.

I am author/co-author of 10 information security books including Hacking For Dummies, Hacking Wireless Networks For Dummies, Securing the Mobile Enterprise For Dummies, and Laptop Encryption For Dummies (all by Wiley) as well as The Definitive Guide to Email Management and Security (Realtimepublishers.com) and The Practical Guide to HIPAA Privacy and Security Compliance (Auerbach). In addition, I am technical editor of the book Network Security For Dummies (Wiley) as well as over a dozen books and whitepapers for Realtimepublishers.com.

I have written 27 whitepapers and over 600 articles on information security. I am a regular contributor of information security content for SearchEnterpriseDesktop.com, SearchCompliance.com, SearchWindowsServer.com, SearchWinIT.com and Security Technology Executive magazine. I have also written articles for Information Security Magazine, CSOOnline.com, and Computerworld.com. In addition, I'm the creator and author of the Security On Wheels information security audio programs providing security learning for IT professionals on the go as well as its associated blog here at securityonwheels.com/blog. You can also view my videos on YouTube at www.youtube.com/principlelogic, follow me on Twitter at www.twitter.com/kevinbeaver and link to me on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/kevinbeaver.

I earned my bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering Technology from Southern College of Technology and my master's degree in Management of Technology from Georgia Tech. I also hold the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification which I obtained in 2001.

Customer Reviews

For me, a fellow CISSP, Kevin's book rates up there with Eric Cole's "Hackers Beware".
Swarthy Fizz
Anyone interested in this topic, but especially those who are new to the world of computer and network security, should read this book.
sixmonkeyjungle
Hacking for Dummies is written on the premise that to catch a hacker, you have to think and behave like one.
Ben Rothke

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

88 of 93 people found the following review helpful By John Matlock on January 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
I used to wonder why anyone would want to break into my computer, there's not much there of any interest. Even I don't find it all that interesting. Then one day I was puzzled when my ISP asked why my machine was putting out millions of bytes of stuff to the point where it was bogging down their T1 line. I didn't know. We unpluged the machine from the network and it stopped sending. We plugged it back in and it wasn't sending. But the next day it was.

It wasn't until we got an e-mail telling us to stop sending out copyrighted movies that we realized what had happened. It wasn't anything in my computer they wanted, it was the bandwidth. Knowing what to look for it wasn't all that hard to stop. Google quickly provided links on this problem.

This book is aimed at people just like me. It gives an overall, if fairly light, view of the overall security problem. Like the other For Dummies books it has a writing style that doesn't (quite) put you to sleep. It has enough humor to enable you to get through it. It won't make you an expert, but it will point out the problem areas so that you can go deeper into those that are important to you. It's a good introduction.
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56 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Ben Rothke on September 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
The media often mistakenly characterize hackers as bored technical geniuses. In truth, most hackers, as the media use the term, are not geniuses; they are simply adept at downloading hacking tools that do all of the dirty work for them. These so-called script kiddies often do not know what they are doing until the damage is done.

From the perspective of the victimized company, however, it's not really important who is doing the attacking; all that matters is how organizations can protect themselves from myriad attacks and tools. Hacking for Dummies is written on the premise that to catch a hacker, you have to think and behave like one. This is a well-written and engrossing book that helps the reader understand how hackers compromise computer systems and networks. Its clear, easy-to-read style won't intimidate readers unfamiliar with abstruse security terms and concepts.

The 19 chapters progress from the basics of security to the hardening of an operating system and the hacking of Web applications. While the reader is not expected to have a deep technical background, the book does go into some detail, as it must to provide a hands-on approach. For a high-level theoretical approach to network defense, look elsewhere. This is a down-and-dirty tool for ensuring that the organization's systems and network are secure.
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96 of 118 people found the following review helpful By Alan Mead on January 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
Update (11/2008): My review below is based on the first (2004) edition. In a comment, the author calls the second, 2006 edition substantially different. So, I reviewed the 2006 edition table of contents, except, and index available on amazon. The excerpt and table of contents did not seem substantially different to me. The primary substantive change in the excerpt (Chapter 1) are the bits about the "rogue insider"; much of the writing is word-for-word identical to the 2004 edition. Maybe the other chapters are "substantially" reworked (the index suggests many changes) but the chapters' titles, order and lengths are not much different in the 2006 edition.

This book should be titled "penetration testing" with the subtitle "without any actual information on how to go about penetration testing, per se".

There are two schools of thought about disseminating detailed information on exploiting security vulnerabilities (that "it's a necessary evil" and "it's immoral"). So, the author is in good company to be in the later group.

Only, why then WRITE A BOOK entitled "Hacking"? The title seems close to fraudulent to me. Anyone hoping to find out how to crack from this book is going to be sorely disappointed. For example, while password cracking is passably well-covered, there isn't even a mention of how crackers get their hands on password files. The author spends only two paragraphs and a few bullets on rootkits--treating them like viruses or worms--despite the fact that they are critical cracker tools. There is a lot of discussion of portscanning without any discussion of how to penetrate the systems you've scanned.

So, you say, "Who cares about would-be criminals!?" Ok, but this book is not going to provide much real value to would-be white-hats either.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Herold on July 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a great, easy to read and use reference for both non-technical business leaders as well as IT professionals. It is also a great resource for home computer users, and small- to medium-sized businesses who often do not have the resources to hire dedicated security staff. The book covers the entire spectrum of ways in which computer systems can be compromised and attacked, an easy-to-understand description of how the exploits are executed, and, usually lacking in other reference books on this topic, step-by-step instructions for not only how to identify when the hacks occur, but also how to defend against them. Kevin Beaver also includes some very important warnings you need to keep in mind when performing your own vulnerability and hacking tests against your own network and systems to discover your own technical weaknesses.
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