Programming Books C Java PHP Python Learn more Browse Programming Books
Hadoop: The Definitive Guide: The Definitive Guide and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Hadoop: The Definitive Guide Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0596521974 ISBN-10: 0596521979 Edition: 1st

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$44.75 $4.32 $21.00

There is a newer edition of this item:


Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Like this book? Find similar titles in the O'Reilly Bookstore.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (June 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596521979
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596521974
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 7.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #653,920 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

MapReduce for the Cloud

About the Author

Tom White has been an Apache Hadoop committer since February 2007, and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation. He works for Cloudera, a company set up to offer Hadoop support and training. Previously he was as an independent Hadoop consultant, working with companies to set up, use, and extend Hadoop. He has written numerous articles for O'Reilly, java.net and IBM's developerWorks, and has spoken at several conferences, including at ApacheCon 2008 on Hadoop. Tom has a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge and a Master's in Philosophy of Science from the University of Leeds, UK.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
3
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 14 customer reviews
Very thorough and well written book.
Techie Evan
It gives a lot of information about the internals of Hadoop, which you will want to know when things go wrong or when you just want to get more out of Hadoop.
Timothy T. Wee
The book also discuss other Apache projects like Hive and HBase.
Maha A. Alabduljalil

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Techie Evan on July 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
These days, one can't seem to attend technical conferences without hearing marketing-oriented speakers' world domination plans for their products. So imagine this: what if pigs and elephants are involved? Elephants would be Hadoop installations, and Pigs would be one of those animal-themed tools, smarter cousins of the elephants really, riding on top of Hadoops, directing them on how to perform their jobs. Would the world be a better place?

Hadoop is the brainchild of Doug Cutting, who named his creation after his kid's stuffed yellow elephant. Hadoop enables large datasets distributed over a cluster of machines to be processed in parallel. One machine or node in that cluster would usually house a JobTracker and a NameNode. The JobTracker schedules and manages processing jobs to be executed in the other machines, and the NameNode manages the metadata (e.g., file names and locations, etc) of the datasets to be processed. The processing jobs are programmed in the form of Map and Reduce functions. Inputs are usually split into blocks to be processed in parallel by two or more identical mappers. The close to final outputs are then fed to one or more identical reducers, whose job is to perform any final transformations on the intermediate data to produce data summaries in the expected format. Several companies are using Hadoop to extract knowledge from their extensive data.

I've read this book and Jason Venners' Pro Hadoop book. Although I like both, I like this book better for the following reasons: more comprehensive coverage of topics, and more insiders' information on design rationales and how certain Hadoop features really work behind the scenes.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 43 people found the following review helpful By BillyJoeBob on September 8, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tom White certainly writes very well: this book is very readable. It is also quite comprehensive, falling somewhere between a tutorial and a reference.

That being said, I was ultimately rather disappointed. First, and most importantly, it was not clear to me after reading this book how I might use Hadoop for some of my projects, or if indeed they were good candidates for MapReduce. I feel it should have been possible to provide some generic guidance. Second, some chapters are written by other authors, and these did not uniformly provide the same quality of instruction, reading occasionally like advertisements.

I confess I am puzzled by the number of encapsulating and utility APIs that have grown up around Hadoop. Why do we need Pig, HBase, Hive, Zookeeper and Cascading? Apparently because (according to what I have read here), bare Hadoop is hard to program with (productively). Some indication of how these wrappers interact with each other would have been helpful.

As it is, I feel LESS urge to evangelize for Hadoop having read this book. Surely not the desired effect?
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Zdziarski on August 24, 2009
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book to catch up on Hadoop, which the rest of my team has been using for several months. Unfortunately I was too busy with other projects to spend any time on MapReduce and thought it'd be a grueling process to be brought up to speed on it. Within the first 25 pages and about 3 hours, Tom had me up and running my first MapReduce job which I successfully adapted for a specific metric we were trying to generate. The book does a great job of breaking down Hadoop's complex pieces into easy to understand components, but doesn't try and pump you full of conceptual BS before it lets you touch real code.

If I were to make any suggestions it would be to start the book off with some simple instructions for installing and getting Hadoop up and running on a local machine, followed by some simple explanations of DFS and Hadoop's commands for managing the file system. I would also explain much earlier how to get your classes recognized by Hadoop for those a bit rusty at Java. Fortunately, the online Wiki was very good about providing instructions to get me going on a Mac, and that took a majority of OS-specific needs off the burden of the book. You will, no doubt, have to be intelligent to read this book, but if you're using Hadoop, there is already a prerequisite for technical proficiency you'll need to satisfy. Overall good job, Tom.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JUG Lugano on April 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
Original review written by Paolo Canesi, JUG Lugano, [...]

Managing and analyzing huge data sets has become a very common problem in various areas of modern information technology, from different types of Web applications (social, financial, trading, ...) to applications for analyzing scientific data.

Distributed systems over a cluster of machines are almost a mandatory choice in such cases, but designing and implementing an effective solution in those areas may be troublesome and become a nightmare.

The Apache Hadoop Project is an infrastructure that helps the construction of reliable, scalable, distributed systems. Mainly known for its MapReduce and distributed file system (HDFS) subprojects, it actually includes other services that complement or extend them.

Tom Whites' "Hadoop: The Definitive Guide" is an enjoyable book which fully explains these complex technologies. The book is organized in such a way that the reader is gently guided into the Hadoop ecosystem. It begins with a couple of very readable chapters as a general introduction to the problems Hadoop is meant to solve and the main solutions to them (MapReduce and HDFS), then examines closely all its aspects, often describing what really happens under the scenes, giving useful design suggestions and common pitfalls descriptions. When reading this book you won't be overwhelmed by tons of lines of code: examples are short and yet effective.

This kind of structure makes it hard to classify the book as a mere tutorial or as a real reference guide, it can be rather considered a mix of the two.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa5312f78)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?