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3.9 out of 5 stars
Halloween H20 [VHS]
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109 of 120 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Attention Amazon.com customers....

1. Avoid this release like the plague. This Blu-ray Disc only has the movie and nothing else. LITERALLY! No subtitles, no trailer, no anything.

2. The picture is subpar for a high-definition transfer. Not to mention, it's not in the original aspect ratio. H20 was filmed in 2.35.1. This version's ratio was changed to 1.78.1.

3. The audio is pathetic. You don't even get surround sound. You get a pitiful DTS 2.0 Stereo track. The DVD at least offered us a 5.1 mix. I thought Blu-ray Disc was supposed to be an upgrade from DVD?

Save your money and avoid this title. Echo Bridge has a reputation for butchering films and they did themselves justice with this one. Until we as consumers stand up and quit buying this garbage of a release, they will never give us the quality that we deserve. The links below will give you a little more information concerning this release.

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65 of 75 people found the following review helpful
on April 6, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Echo Bridge's release of Halloween H20 is severly comprimised and should be avoided.
First, this release is not in the original aspect ratio. Originally released theatrically at 2.35:1 (per imdb), this Blu-ray includes a cropped 1.78:1 aspect ratio
Second, the only audio option is a DTS-HD 2.0 stereo mix, as opposed to the 5.1 mix included as part of the original dvd release from December 1999! Additionally, there are no subtitle options for the hearing impaired.
Lastly, there are no special features whatsoever.
So, let's see, no OAR, comprimised audio, no subs, no special features.

Remind me again why anyone would by this rush cash grab by Echo Bridge?
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44 of 50 people found the following review helpful
Format: Blu-ray
Certainly, after watching "Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers", I had little interest in ever seeing Michael Myers again, who over the course of six films had transformed from a mysteriously eerie serial killer into a monolithic, robotic Druid(!) henchman. Amazingly, the next film in the franchise would redeem the "Halloween" name, a rarity for a sequel so late in the series. In fact, "Halloween H20" is probably the best sequel in the Halloween series (I confess to having a soft spot for "Halloween 2", but I freely admit that the film is problematic). Simply put, "H20" is the sequel fans had been waiting many years to see... even if some (like me) didn't know it.

The decision was made for "H20" to ignore the last series of sequels and act as a direct sequel to "Halloween II"; it was a wise decision, freeing the series from the various inane story lines and C-List characters that accumulatively dragged down the series over the years. Pleasingly, "H20" manages to both scare and entertain in a way that I thought just wasn't possible for the film series anymore. Finely directed by old school slasher film director Steve Miner (doing a better job with "H20" than he ever did on any of his 1980's "Friday The 13th" films), the film is smartly cast, has good production values, and is a blessed with a tight, straightforward plot. Jamie Lee Curtis gives a great lead performance, and the ending is the most satisfying of all the Halloween films (and that includes the original).

Special bonus points for "H20": it's the first sequel since "Halloween II" to get "The Shape" right! Armed once again with a creepy William Shatner-esque mask (which is actually achieved through a combination of 5 different masks and some CGI effects), a lithe build and quick, methodical body movement, "The Shape" is looking and acting more like his old eerie/ghostly self than he has in years. Certainly, this is a welcome reprieve from the graceless, hulking, albino-masked mongoloid that brutishly skulked around in the last few film sequels.

"Halloween: H20" isn't perfect; the characterizations (with the exception of Curtis's role) are drawn rather sketchily, the plot is a little too minalmist, and the music score is far more "Scream" than "Halloween" (literally, as parts of the score is actually taken from the "Scream" film!). Still, "H20" is a must-see for any self-respecting horror fan, and is well-made enough that (just as was the case with the first film) even non-genre fans should enjoy it; a four-star film (out of five).

Recently, there has been a lot of rancorous noise regarding U.S. distributer Echo Bridge's recent budget Blu-Ray release of "Halloween H20", which can either be purchased alone or as a double feature with the awful "Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers". Primary criticisms from early reviews have been the following: "H20" has had its original aspect ratio changed; only a Dolby 2.0 lossless soundtrack is included; the print is of poor quality; and there are no extras of any kind.

Regarding the Echo Bridge Blu-Ray release, even at a price of $9.99, this is one sucky presentation of a quality film. Blacks range from dark gray to crushing, detail fluctuates between soft and mediocre, colors look flat, the print is dirty, and DNR, edge enhancement and compression artifacts all pop up intermittently throughout the film. Also, the film's original theatrical aspect ratio has been altered from 2.35:1 to 1.78:1 (although nothing has been cropped, as the film was shot in Super 35, which allows for aspect ratio changes on a film without losing any picture). Unfortunately, the open matte presentation does indeed alter the cinematic feel of the picture, throwing composition off in many scenes, and giving the film an overall TV movie-like feel that was clearly not intended by the director. Finally, the Dolby 2.0 lossless soundtrack is adequate for a surround track, but why is this here on a Blu-Ray, when perfectly good DTS-HD 5.1 and Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtracks exist elsewhere? Overall, with a sub-par presentation and zero extras, the Echo Bridge Blu-Ray release of "H20" screams "cheap cash-in", and will certainly disappoint fans of the film, which is why the Echo Bridge Blu-Ray presentation of "H20" earns a one-star (out of five) review.

This is not my first disappointment with an Echo Bridge Blu-Ray release. My first was merely weeks ago, when I picked up Echo Bridge's recent Blu-Ray release of "From Dusk 'Till Dawn"; just as was the case with "H20", the Blu-Ray was pretty crummy looking, even for its price. Frustrated and disappointed with that earlier release, I took a chance and ordered the Canadian Blu-Ray release of "From Dusk 'Till Dawn" from Canadian distributer Alliance (who has a dodgy reputation when it comes to Blu-Ray releases), and I'm glad I did, as the Alliance Blu-Ray was superior to the Echo Bridge release in every regard. Feeling encouraged, I decided to give the "Halloween Triple Pack" Blu-Ray release from Alliance a shot (which I picked up from Amazon.ca for $30.00, including shipping). This is a case of a gem sandwiched between two turds, as the best of the Halloween sequels ("H20") is unfortunately bookended between the two very worst sequels ("Curse" and "Resurrection"). It is on the strength of "H20" alone, that I decided to splurge on the Canadian import.

So, was it worth the trouble and cash to purchase this import? Certainly, for me I feel it was. Although "Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers" and "Halloween: H20" are presented in 1080i (only "Halloween: Resurrection" is shown in 1080P), the picture quality of all three of the films look respectable, certainly heads and shoulders above any DVD release. The aspect ratio for "Halloween: H20" is indeed in its original aspect ratio of 2.35.1 ("Halloween: Resurrection" is also shown in its correct aspect ratio of 2.35.1, while "Halloween: The Curse...", originally released in 1.85:1, is shown in an incorrect aspect ratio of 1.78.1). Sharpness is good, colors are accurate looking and blacks are strong for all three films. There doesn't appear to be any edge enhancement or DNR.

Is "H20" on the Alliance triple-pack presented better than the Echo Bridge release? Yes, it is. Although far from great-looking, the "H20" print on the Alliance release isn't quite as dirty-looking as the Echo Bridge Blu-Ray. As stated earlier, H20's original theatrical aspect ratio is left untouched, restoring the film's cinematic look that was lost on the Echo Bridge release. For certain, it would have been nice if Alliance cleaned up the print for "Halloween: H20" (which unfortunately looks the shabbiest of the three films on the disc), but all things considered, "H20" looks better than the Echo Bridge presentation, even in 1080i.

On the other hand, the audio on the Alliance release "H20" completely blows away the Echo Bridge release. In fact, the audio for all three films sound quite good, with each film given a solid 5.1 DTS-HD Master audio soundtrack, complete with strong surround effects and good bass.

For hardcore U.S. fans, the Alliance triple pack is indeed worth picking up. Now, make no mistake about it, all of these films can (and should) be presented in a far better manner on Blu-Ray than what is on this triple-pack disc, with a nice remastered 1080P picture and special features galore. Yet, for what it is, hardcore fans should be mostly be pleased, as the presentation for all three movies is more than watchable.

However, for casual U.S. fans, in spite of my poor review, I do think they'll be better served with either the $9.99 Echo Bridge stand-alone Blu-Ray release of "H20", or the $16.00 Echo Bridge "H20"/"Curse of..." Blu-Ray double feature. The fact is, I simply can't justify casual fans shelling out 30-plus dollars for one good film and two awful ones, especially given the weak video presentation of "H20" on the Alliance Blu-ray. Casual fans likely won't mind (and may even prefer) the screen-filling open matte presentation of Echo Bridge's "H20" Blu-Ray release, and will probably feel satisfied enough with the Dolby 2.0 lossless soundtrack.

The sad reality is, this is probably as good as it's going to get for these films on Blu-Ray in the Region "A" market... at least for a while. Hopefully, Echo Bridge's distribution rights while expire sooner than later for these "Halloween" films, and they'll see a better presentation down the line. Needless to say, I'm going to take a pass on future offerings from Echo Bridge.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on July 16, 2001
Format: DVD
The "Halloween" saga has always been a favorite of horror film fans. It began with a ground-breaking, terrifying original, and moved onto "Halloween II" which continued the story on the same night as the original, making it the perfect companion piece. While not as relentlessly terrifying as the original, it is a scary movie.
Then came "Halloween 3" which had nothing to do with the rest of the series. It could have been an all right movie if they had left off the "Halloween" title. But it raised so many fan expectations that it fell very short.
"Halloween 4" brought Michael Myers back, and returned to the suspense of the first two films, heralding the 10-year-old original. "Halloween 5" was a step down in quality, with a good first 20 minutes, and suspenseful second half to make up for the "stupid teenagers and sex" sub-plot. "Halloween 6" was on the same level as the fifth one--entertaining in parts, but it was so choppy, you could hardly tell what was going on a lot of the time.
Then it came full-circle. 20 years after the original film came "Halloween: H20--Twenty Years Later", bringing everybody's favorite horror heroine, Laurie Strode--played by Jamie Lee Curtis--back to the screen. It bypasses films 3-6, and becomes a direct sequel to the first two. It is an excellent film, very scary and suspenseful, while not falling too much into the trappings of "Scream" rip-offs. With Jamie Lee Curtis and Michael Myers going face-to-face 20 years later, it brings a successful resolution to the saga.
"Halloween: The Homecoming" is supposed to be coming out soon, and I'll probably see it, just because it too has JLC and Michael Myers. But I have a feeling that it is going to be about as good as "Halloweens 3, 5, and 6", which is not very good. "Homecoming" will negate the whole effect of H20's brilliant climax in which Michael finally meets with his death, and I think it should stay unreleased. If you want to experience the true story of Halloween, watch "Halloween", "Halloween II", and "Halloween H20". This trilogy of Michael Myers and Jamie Lee Curtis is super-scary and brings the terrifying story to a satisfying resolution.
It begins 20 years after the first two films, and Nurse Marion from the first two finds her house broken into, with files on Laurie Strode missing, before Michael Myers kills her. Then Michael heads out to California, where Laurie is living under a different name, with her teenage son John, and running a prep school. But as Halloween draws closer, Laurie must finally face her demons, and goes head-to-head with her masked brother for a final showdown that has an unexpected, yet completely satisfying conclusion--bringing the story of Michael and Laurie to a close. The acting is excellent for a horror film, and it is a beautifully made film. The music, which hints at John Carpenter's original themes, is very creepy. The direction is quite good as well. It is certainly the best of the "Halloween" sequels, follwed closely by "II".
The DVD is an awesome widescreen version. But there is no commentary as mentioned on the box, and no theatrical trailers. But there is a neat documentary on the making of the film. And the picture and sound quality is excellent. Buy H20 now, before it's too late! You won't regret it. Now you can see how the horror saga really ends.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on April 30, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Best Buy has these on sale now so I have it prior to the release date. Avoid it no matter what.

I already have the Candian triple feature blu-ray with this movie, but I was intrigued when I read that in this release the black bars at the top and bottom of the screen are removed to actually show more picture. It was cheap and I'm definitely a cult fan, so I grabbed it. Yeah, not worth it. It makes it look bad...too much sky above people's heads in lots of shots and things like that.

The picture quality is overall atrocious. It looks like a DVD print with a noise reduction filter applied to it. Some parts make you feel like your player or tv is messed up because of flicker or jitter, but no, it's just a horrible transfer. Definitely NOT 1080P even though it says it is. It also says the audio is "2.0 STERE"...great attention to detail guys.

I'm going to jump on the bandwagon and say hold out for a better release or get the Candian triple feature...it's much better quality and true to it's claim of 1080i.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on September 7, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Halloween H2O is a good movie, not just because Jamie Lee Curtis reprises her role as Laurie Strode, but because it has a believable story, good setting, and solid acting. In this movie, Laurie is haunted by memories of Michael Myers, and is fearful that he may return to kill her. Laurie shows her vulnerability by becoming an alcoholic while trying to cope with her demons. She has since moved far away (northern California) but that doesn't stop Michael from finding and stalking her. This movie still has the same brand of suspense, chills, and fright that the first movie became known for. Nothing will ever top Halloween 1978, but this one is worthy of a good look. 8/10
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Format: DVD
When it comes right down to it, like it or not, this is the true Halloween 3. We all know that the original Halloween 3 had nothing at all to do with the first two films. The other sequels 4 - 6, began branching off the main characters as extended family of the Laurie Strode character who was supposed to be dead. With Halloween H20, the sequels 4 to 6 are basically tossed out the window and erased from accepted Halloween Canon. The good news is that none of those films were particularly great and other than the inclusion of Donald Pleasance as the avenging Dr. Loomis, they are most forgettable.

Not that this film is perfect mind you..it takes some awfully big leaps in logic. It's supposed to be 20 years later and Laurie Strode is now the head-master of an exclusive private school. Years ago she faked her death and took on the alias of Keri Tate in order to hide herself from her brother Michael. But when papers of Dr. Loomis that reveal her true identity come up missing, the Shape is once again on her trail, bent on finishing the job he started 20 years earlier.

Josh Hartnett plays Strode's son John who is supposed to leave with most of the rest of the kids on a trip, but instead stays in the almost emply school grounds with his girlfriend and several other kids to have their own private party free from adults. Naturally they are the first to encounter Michael Myers who manages to slip past the worlds worst security guard played by L.L. Cool J.

Despites some of the implausibilites of the script, it's the most effective thriller in the series since Halloween II. The scene where Laurie manages to lock a door before michael can get her, but they still come face to face due to a window is a genuinely creepy scene. Add to that is the fact that H20 Director Steve Minor was a far more experienced and accomplished director than the three guys who did the previous sequels and you have a far more effective film.

All in all, when if comes right down to it, this is the true Halloween 3!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2006
Format: DVD
Halloween H2O was a Perfect End to Michael Myers I Liked this Better than "Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers" I Mean Michael Myers will always be My Favorite Killer The Ending was great Michael for once like he did with Jamie in "Halloween 5"

Shows his Human side to Laurie before she puts him to rest However it is ruined because of "Halloween Resurrection" I would reccomend These ones

Halloween

Halloween 2

Halloween 4 - The Return of Michael Myers

Halloween 5 - The Revenge of Michael Myers

Halloween H2O

Stay away From

Halloween 3

Halloween - The Curse of Michael Myers

Halloween Resurrection
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 22, 2010
Format: DVD
"Halloween H20" is the 7th film in the Halloween franchise, and the sixth to tell a story of the relentless killer, Michael Myers. The H20 in the title makes reference to the 20th anniversary of the original film, and this also means the film is set 20 years after the original. However, this film ignores all the previous Halloween sequels, creating its own new continuity. That's actually a pet-peeve of mine, but it's hard to complain about it when they finally get back the original star, Jamie Lee Curtis, to continue the story of Laurie Strode. In fact, the bonus features on this DVD imply that this was a pet project of Jamie's.

So, 20 years after Laurie Strode was traumatically stalked by her brother, Michael, in the first two Halloween films, we pick up with her life as a private school headmistress using the false name of "Keri Tate" to prevent her brother from finding her once again. Laurie has seriously been disturbed by her past though, and she is now an alcoholic with a dependency on medications as well, struggling to go on and raise her teenage son who feels she is overbearing and overprotective. Laurie is also trying to have a romantic relationship with a school counselor who seems quite perfect for her, but ultimately, things are going to fall apart, because you know Michael Myers has finally picked up her trail, and Laurie is finally going to have to face off with her monster once and for all.

"Halloween H20", should have been the dream sequel for hardcore fans of the original two films. Unfortunately, I often only hear negatives about it. Personally, I feel people are determined to judge these nostalgia sequels extra harshly. This isn't a bad film, it's just got some issues that are instant turn-offs for many. Probably the biggest problem is that it screams 90's horror. Watching this, you could easily be convinced you were watching a Scream, Urban Legend, or I Know What You Did Last Summer sequel. Now, I like those movies myself. Most are not as good as seventies and early eighties horror, and they're more dated too, but the best of them, like the original Scream, are very good. Much better than later ones, like the Black Christmas or Prom Night remakes. However, it admittedly is a little weird to see a Halloween film that looks so much like a Scream film. I think a lot of people just have a real problem with that, as a lot of horror fans just hate 90's horror stylings. Frankly, probably the biggest problem for me was the poor comic relief in the form of LL Cool J's phone conversations with his cartoonish-sounding wife (yeah, LL Cool J is in this as a school security officer). That and the fact that you never warm up all that much to the teen characters, who are late 90's uber cool and don't really grow on you, not even Laurie's son, played by Josh Hartnett (who is always kinda hard to like). But, overall, this Halloween installment/reboot (which I remember feeling very short when I saw it in the theater) is actually pretty good, I feel, if you can get past all the 90's stuff. The point of this story is Laurie Strode dealing with her demons, and I think the ending would have been a better ending for this run of Myers all together before the later reboot. What a shame they felt they had to make one more. Anyway, I can understand how there are many reasons to not love this film, but it still is pretty enjoyable and it's great to catch up with Laurie Strode again. Definitely a must have for fans of the original two films. Well, a must-see at least. The DVD holds a behind the scenes featurette, a trivia game, and a music video. Kind of light for a "Collector's Series Deluxe Edition". Oh well.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: DVD
The last decade or so has not been the highlight of the Halloween series. Resurrection was a disaster, and so were Rob Zombie's interpretations of the first 2 films. They were all cluttered with typical, unimaginative slash-em-up fanfare with no creativity behind them. Considering Michael has been terrorizing Haddonfield since 1978, it's not surprising that the series is losing steam by now. However, H20 is by far the best of the recent Halloween flicks, and one of the best in the series.

The plot is simple: Laurie Strode is 20 years older, has a successful career, a son, and a love interest. But there's just one problem--the memories of her uncle on that fateful night (which spanned 1 and 2) still haunt her. She has resorted to an alcohol problem and pigeonholing her 17-year-old son, latching onto the hope that it would help her cope. Everyone around her tells her to move on, but lo and behold, Myers is back! After stealing information on the whereabouts of his niece, he's goes on the prowl to finish what he started 20 years ago. John Carpenter creates his vision of the Myers trilogy very well. The "Thorn" trilogy, as it's called, is ignored with H20; Carpenter wasn't too happy with how Myers was portrayed in 4-6 (4, in my opinion and many others', is the best sequel of the series, actually. 5 is pretty good and underrated, but I'll side with Carpenter on Part 6!). It brings everything full circle, and the head-on collision between Myers and Laurie is very intense and enjoyable. Watching them wage a battle on each other alone throughout the school contains some of the most memorable moments the series has to offer. The cast is great. Jamie Lee Curtis does as great of a job as ever. She continues the story of Laurie in a way that is logical and fits within her characterization. LL Cool J plays the lovable security guard who is an aspiring romantic writer. The teen actors and actresses are all perfectly likable, and behave how teens do in this day and age. This is also the only movie of the series to provide a sense of closure. Some fans will hate it, some will love it.

But not everything is perfect. The movie lacks suspense where it otherwise could have had it. The epic orchestration is fitting in some parts of the movie, but totally unnecessary in others. Had it been cut out in some scenes, there could have been much more tension and more of a horror vibe. It almost pains me because it truly does ruin some scenes. Michael's mask shows too much of the skin around his eyes, making him appear more human, which further lessens the tension. The mask in the early films was far more effective. Also, H20 takes awhile to get the ball rolling. I understand the need to develop the characters, but there's a noticeable lack of Michael in the first segment of the film, and it makes the film drag. I liked the ending, and I applaud Carpenter's attempt to conjure a sense of resolution, but it feels somewhat anti-climactic. It's not quite as earth-shattering as it should have and had the right to have been. It's quite unexpected, and there's a good chance that it might make you jump, but more could have been done with such a monumental moment.

As far as sequels go, however, H20 works pretty damn well, and provides a highly entertaining experience. Carpenter is one of horror's finest directors, and H20 is almost worthy of joining the ranks of his trilogy masterpiece (Halloween, The Fog, The Thing). There is only so much one can do with an idea that's been used over and over for 20 years (32 as of writing this review), but Carpenter makes us of all of it and more to create one of the best installments in the Halloween saga.
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