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Hallows Eve Hardcover – October 30, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Cemetery Dance Pubns; Limited edition (October 30, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587670771
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587670770
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,675,592 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Samhain, the scheming Lord of Death, is back for more Halloween mischief in Sarrantonio's lackluster sequel to Orangefield (2001). Thanks to misdeeds in the historical past, the quaint pumpkin-farming community of Orangefield is the locus for supernatural evil perpetrated by the cartoonishly drawn Samhain, earthly servitor of the nebulous Dark One. This year, Samhain sets his sights on Corrie Phaeder, a local boy who's returned home from the west coast to recover from his ruined career and love life. Also figuring in Samhain's dark design is Corrie's neighbor Regina Bright, a chipper seven-year-old whose innocence insulates her from weird incidents that slowly superimpose themselves on her world. The author casts his dark fable with crusty rustics on sabbatical from a Stephen King novel, and he sketches the town vividly with imagery as crisp as the first bite of an autumn apple. His plotting, however, has the stale aftertaste of the previous book. Once again, Samhain engineers the death of townspeople crucial to his plans in episodic and seemingly disassociated vignettes. A trip to Samhain's realm towards the novel's end adds a jolt of vitality, but takes the tale in the direction of a young-adult quest fantasy. The story concludes with the hint of other Orangefield adventures to come, and the prospect that they may offer more than this rehash of past Halloween tricks and treats.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

Al Sarrantonio is the author of forty-five books. He is a winner of the Bram Stoker Award, the Shirley Jackson Award and the Audie Award, and has been a finalist for the World Fantasy Award, the British Fantasy Award, the International Horror Guild Award, the Locus Award and the Private Eye Writers of America Shamus Award.
His novels, spanning the horror, science fiction, fantasy, mystery and western genres, include Moonbane, Skeletons, House Haunted, the Five Worlds trilogy, the Masters of Mars trilogy, West Texas, and the Orangefield Halloween trilogy.
Hailed as "brilliant" and "a master anthologist" by Booklist, he has edited numerous collections of new tales, including the highly acclaimed 999: New Stories of Horror and Suspense, Redshift : Extreme Visions of Speculative Fiction, Flights: Extreme Visions of Fantasy, Stories (with co-editor Neil Gaiman), Halloween: New Poems, and, most recently, Portents.
His short stories have appeared in magazines such as Heavy Metal, Twilight Zone, Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Realms of Fantasy, Analog, and Amazing, as well as in anthologies such as The Year's Best Horror Stories, Visions of Fantasy: Tales from the Masters, Great Ghost Stories, Best New Horror and The Best of Shadows. His stories have been collected in Toybox, Hornets and Others, and Halloween and Other Seasons. He has had numerous book club sales, and his work has been translated into more than a dozen languages and appeared in comic book form. He currently lives in New York's historic Hudson Valley region. His website is www.Alsarrantonio.com

Customer Reviews

The last third of HALLOWS EVE is more like a fantasy story than a horror tale.
Thriller Lover
I had never heard of author All Sarrantonio but I figured I would give him a try, the book was on sale and I figured...."Why not"?
Music Fan-atic
The heroes are one-dimensional and uninteresting, and the villains are just as bad.
Marylander4Life

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Marylander4Life on July 11, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If there's one positive thing I can muster about Al Sarrantonio's "Hallows Eve," it's that he conjurs atmosphere beautifully. Like other reviewers have noted, Sarrantonio truly knows how to capture the essence of our darkest and most rustic holiday. The spirit of Halloween is readily apparent in this book; it practically clings to every page as Sarrantonio sketches a refreshingly macabre, yet strangely picturesque, portrait of smalltown Americana amidst the cold Autumn chill of Samhain. Reading this book I could practically *smell* the candy corn and hear the rustling of the cornstalks as they emanated from the page. So, based on that aspect alone, I would recommend this book.

Unfortunately, the novel is saddled with a dull, contrived supernatural plotline that Sarrantonio must have dug up from a cobweb-covered box of CLICHES. Of course there's the emotionally scarred hero, returning to his hometown of Orangefield for the first time since something really bad happened to him as a youngster. There's the good-hearted but skeptical cop who gets caught up in the action, and the innocent little girl who holds the key to the mystery. And then there's a helpful wraith, disguised as a scarecrow, who pops up at random intervals to provide needless exposition for the audience.

Now, overused plot I could've dealt with, but the main problem with "Hallows Eve" is the simple fact that Sarrantonio doesn't have the talent to bring even this story justice. He may be great at writing atmosphere, but when it comes to characterization he's at a total loss. The heroes are one-dimensional and uninteresting, and the villains are just as bad.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By - Kasia S. VINE VOICE on February 22, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have always had a soft spot for Halloween in my heart, and even though I haven't read the prequel, Orangefield, I still enjoyed this story. Sarrantonio sucked me into his tale of the whimsical town that is known for its pumpkins. Halloween is the main event and celebration; everyone seems to prepare it all year round. This year however series of unexpected events reoccurs more often, and as we learn what caused them the tale grows chillier by each page. I loved the description of the festive mood, the corn husks under the shoes, warm winds, crisp harvested apples, pumpkin patches and town full of folklore.

Corrie Phaeder is back home because suddenly his life fell apart back in California and he is mysteriously drawn back to the place where his mother died. He didn't want to be back in Orangefield, but power beyond him have directed him back home. Right of the bat, we meet John, a mysterious creature that seems to know everything Corrie dreams about and who foretells him about horrible things happening, while Halloween is two weeks away. He and a little girl, Reggie with the help of a local cop, Grant, try to solve the unnatural happenings while battling mythological evil that has spawned stories about Orangefield. The trouble is that the stories start to look more like truth and when everyone who tries to help Corrie seems to have a fatal "accident" he has nowhere to turn but John, but can he fully trust a strange creature that comes from another dimension?

Sarrantonio did a great job writing phenomenal descriptions of matter that is not of this world, the shapes, colors, sounds, inflated bubbles, geometric forests, Technicolor waiting stations, ghouls, walking pumpkin men and dark clouds of destruction were really vividly pained and filled my head with images.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By William M Miller on November 20, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Hallows Eve" is Al Sarrantonio's second novel in the Orangefield series (although I don't know why Leisure decided to release the second book first). The story starts off stronger than the predictable finish, but I found it solid nonetheless. As a writer, Sarrantonio has flavors reminiscent of T.M. Wright and Tom Piccirilli. The book is a very quick read, but I wanted Sarrantonio to push the envelope a little more.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chad Harry on October 18, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book to me was a fast and fun read. The way this guy describes The halloween season is fantastic. It's a also a great story and cool concept. A must for fans who want a good read for Halloween.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on November 6, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
While I enjoyed this book, I wouldn't go so far to call it anything like Ray Bradbury. I mean, come on, that's the guy who wrote timeless masterpieces that will never die.

This is more a dark fantasy set in Sarrantonio's town of Orangefield, a kind of Halloween spookland where very weird things take place.

Al Sarrantonio creats a dark Halloween world of death that is ruled by Samhain. Things from his world cross over into the present and make for an atmospheric tale of ghostly pumpkin men, strange murders, and another strange world you go to when you die.

Sarrantonio did a good job including all the cool Halloween spooks and autumn wanderings, while still keeping with the main tale of Corrie Phaeder's decent into near madness at the hands of John, a supernatural being in the form of a scarecrow with the head of a pumpkin.

I enjoyed this enough to read the other Orangfield books by Sarrantonio. And I would defintely recommend this to Halloween fans. I'm sure this could be read any time of the year, but I would suggest only reading it come autumn, or even better, on Halloween night in one sitting.

Horrordude.
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