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Halo: Primordium: Book Two of the Forerunner Saga Hardcover – January 3, 2012


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Halo: Primordium: Book Two of the Forerunner Saga + Halo: Silentium (The Forerunner Saga) + Halo: Cryptum: Book One of the Forerunner Saga
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Product Details

  • Series: The Forerunner Saga (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (January 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765323974
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765323972
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 6.6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (165 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #114,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

GREG BEAR is the author of more than thirty books of science fiction and fantasy, including Hull Zero Three, City at the End of Time, Eon, Moving Mars, Mariposa, and Quantico.  He is married to Astrid Anderson Bear and is the father of Erik and Alexandra. Awarded two Hugos and five Nebulas for his fiction, one of two authors to win a Nebula in every category, Bear has been called the “Best working writer of hard science fiction” by “The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.” His stories have been collected into an omnibus volume by Tor Books. Bear has served on political and scientific action committees and has advised both government agencies and corporations on issues ranging from national security to private aerospace ventures to new media and video game development. His most recent endeavor is a long-term collaboration with Neal Stephenson and the Subutai Corporation on The Mongoliad, an interactive serial novel available on multiple platforms, including iPhone, iPad, and Kindle.


More About the Author

Greg Bear is the author of more than thirty books, spanning thrillers, science fiction, and fantasy, including Blood Music, Eon, The Forge of God, Darwin's Radio, City at the End of Time, and Hull Zero Three. His books have won numerous international prizes, have been translated into more than twenty-two languages, and have sold millions of copies worldwide. Over the last twenty-eight years, he has also served as a consultant for NASA, the U.S. Army, the State Department, the International Food Protection Association, and Homeland Security on matters ranging from privatizing space to food safety, the frontiers of microbiology and genetics, and biological security.

Customer Reviews

Book is interesting and well written.
William G. Sitz
It's just... long and boring and in no way satisfies the hunger that Book One leaves you with.
David McDuffie
I look forward to the next book in this series.
Darth Lucious

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Douglas on May 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a pretty good book in the Halo series. The pace is slow until about 1/2 way in, and then things start picking up. The first half of the novel is literally about the main characters walking across Halo.... then things get interesting.

I would NOT suggest this book if you have not read Cryptum, and I would NOT suggest reading it if you are not that into the extended fiction. This series does NOT feature the Covenant or UNSC, but the earlier factions (forrunner, ancient humans, flood). It is not paced like The Fall of Reach, or Ghosts of Onyx. Therefore, it may not be enjoyable because this series is building the set for Halo 4 - not any of the previous games and some people fail to realize that.

If you are looking for more "Halo 2-3" style stories, you should read Halo: Evolutions.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Scrantonicity on August 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Primordium picks up soon after the events of the first book. Much of the first book detailed the Forerunner culture and its inner workings. In the second book we follow Chakas, a supporting human character from book 1. Chakas is stranded on a Halo ring and he journeys with some others he meets to figure out how to escape. This book details his journey and the epic revelations he uncovers.

What follows is a very enthralling story that develops Chakas as a character and reveals layer after layer of the Human/Forerunner relations and the events that have led up to book 1, Halo Cryptum.

We learn more of the war between Humans and Forerunners and get glimpses into the Flood and the mysterious Captive (from book 1) and their impact in the Universe.

This isn't an action or plot oriented book. Its about discovery and mythology. If you don't have patience for character and story then this book will probably bore you. If you are interested in the mythology of the Halo Universe then you will be delighted. Greg Bear blows the doors open and fills the Halo Universe with depth and countless possibilities.

I tore through this book eager for each bit of tantalizing mythology that would be revealed. Slowly, the world is opened up to us, not in blatant exposition but rather along side Chakas as he catches glimpses into his own genetic past the mysteries of the Flood, the Geas implanted by the Librarian, the Forerunner/Human War and war currently taking place.

This book is very important in understanding the place of Humans in this universe and definitely worth the read.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By T. Hill TOP 500 REVIEWER on October 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wow, what a surprise this book has been. I came in expecting it to be the darker middle entry in a trilogy that would ultimately have a tragic-but-hopeful ending. This book is not that. It is dark to be sure, but in many ways, this hardly feels in any way like a sequel to Cryptum. The only thing that even reminds me that this is related to that book is that some characters reappear, and that it takes place on a Halo, but that's about it. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but there's no doubt this book suffers a bit more than the first, despite its strengths.

This book takes place starting at an event roughly two-thirds of the way through Cryptum, when everyone has been captured by the Master Builder. Somehow, Chakas and Riser have been misplaced in a chaotic situation and end up on a rogue Halo installation, now under the control of the mysterious Primordial and the rampant AI Mendicant Bias. The story is told through Chakas' viewpoint, and chronicles his journey alongside companions new and old across the surface of this great ringworld, in excruciating detail. It's a VERY interesting story and quite compelling at times. There are tons of genuinely fascinating concepts, ideas, events, and characters dotting the landscape of this story. The actual events and revelations are truly great and some are even moving. It's not perfect though. Characters' moods and emotions will sometimes change on a dime for seemingly no reason, and it feels at times like there's little genuine character development, which is a shame after Cryptum did such a good job at that.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Duckets615 on April 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Imagine you go on a camping trip with a bunch of friends for a few days. Write down every little thing you see or do, write down every time you stopped to look at a weird plant, write down every time you saw a squirrel running up a tree, write down every time you stopped to go to the bathroom, and then at the very end of your trip a bunch of aliens show up and do some cool sh@# and what you have is basically Halo Primordium. This entire book is humans walking around a Halo describing every tiny little thing they see to the point you want to slam your head against the wall to break the boredom. 7/8 of this book is entirely unnecessary and serve no purpose to the plot except to fill up pages. How this guy got a book like this published is beyond me.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By T. Holtz on July 31, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read the first of the Series and rated it a 4 out of 5. It was not as fast paced as the original Halo book series but I expected that. This (book 2 of the Forerunner trilogy) was so slow, so painful to read that I don't understand how it passed the editors. The first 3/4 of the book are pointless for the most part, it details Risers journey across the Halo and all the mundane things that come across his path to lord knows where. The author painstakingly details things that are irrelevant to the bigger picture (like how a tree looks) but quickly breezes through important points (like the grave mind encounter) with little to no detail. The plot is boring and there was little to no character development. Peoples moods change for no reason and mostly everything is eventually explained by the monitors which, again, should have happened sooner in the book to keep the readers attention. If I knew I was about to read a book about boring alien landscapes I would rather have watched grass grow. Very disappointed in the book as a whole. Almost felt like this could have been a short story as 80% of the text is filler.

You have been warned...
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