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  • Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 5 (The Glass Tomb / Paid to Kill)
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Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 5 (The Glass Tomb / Paid to Kill)


List Price: $14.99
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$8.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 12 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 5 (The Glass Tomb / Paid to Kill) + Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 4 (Terror Street / Wings of Danger)
Price for both: $18.98

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Editorial Reviews

The Glass Tomb (1955) - A circus barker stages a sensational new act, the world's longest fast undertaken by "Sapolio", on view in a glass cage. But this act also results in several murders, a kidnapping, and a poisoning! Paid to Kill (1954) - A man’s business deal fails and to provide for his "adoring" wife, he hires his best friend to kill him so his wife can collect on his insurance. The business deal comes through at the last minute but he finds he can’t call off the murder. His treacherous double-crossing wife has different ideas! First time on video. Bonus Features: Scene Selection| Bios| Advertising Galleries| Photo Galleries| Trailers| "The Glass Tomb" Commentary by Richard Roberts. Specs: DVD9; Dolby Digital; 130 minutes; B&W; 1:66:1/ 1.33:1 Aspect Ratio; MPAA – NR; Year - 1955, 1954; SRP - $14.99.

Special Features

  • Commentary on The Glass Tomb by Richard M. Roberts
  • Photo gallery
  • Advertising galleries
  • Bios
  • Trailers

Product Details

  • Actors: Dane Clark, Cecile Chevreau, Paul Carpenter, Thea Gregory, Anthony Forwood
  • Directors: Montgomery Tully
  • Writers: A.E. Martin, Paul Tabori, Richard H. Landau
  • Producers: Anthony Hinds
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Dolby, Full Screen, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Vci Video
  • DVD Release Date: December 26, 2006
  • Run Time: 130 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • ASIN: B000JJSJDW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #158,283 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 5 (The Glass Tomb / Paid to Kill)" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David Blake on March 24, 2007
Verified Purchase
This series of films noir feature B movies made at Bray Studio in the years before Hammer shifted into the horror genre.

These films are, frankly, British attempts to ape America - using an American star and a British cast. As such, they are now very interesting windows on the English post-War scene - shell-scarred London, suburban side streets, working people just about making a living.

You only get this sort of truth in B movies, because the film-makers couldn't afford to build sets - so they took their cameras onto the streets.

I've bought - and recommend - all these volumes. On this particular set, "The Glass Tomb" has a poorer picture quality than the other films in the series.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. Lovins HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 26, 2006
VCI Entertainment and Kit Parker Films present "Hammer Film Noir Vol. 5" (1955) --- (Dolby digitally remastered) --- Film noir has sources not only in cinema but other artistic mediums as well...the low-key lighting schemes commonly linked with the classic mode are in the tradition of chiaroscuro and tenebrism, techniques using high contrasts of light and dark developed by 15th- and 16th-century painters associated with Mannerism and the Baroque...film noir's aesthetics are deeply influenced by German Expressionism, a cinematic movement of the 1910s and 1920s closely related to contemporaneous developments in theater, photography, painting, scultpture, and architecture...opportunities offered by the booming Hollywood film industry and, later, the threat of growing Nazi power led to the emigration of many important film artists working in Germany who had either been directly involved in the Expressionist movement or studied with its practitioners...Directors such as Fritz Lang, Robert Siodmak, and Michael Curtiz brought dramatic lighting techniques and a psychologically expressive approach to mise-en-scène with them to Hollywood, where they would make some of the most famous of classic noirs. Lang's 1931 masterwork, the German M, is among the first major crime films of the sound era to join a characteristically noirish visual style with a noir-type plot, one in which the protagonist is a criminal (as are his most successful pursuers). M was also the occasion for the first star performance by Peter Lorre, who would go on to act in several formative American noirs of the classic era.

First up we have "THE GLASS TOMB" (aka: Glass Cage) (1955) (59 min. B/W) --- Under Montgomery Tully (Director), Anthony Hinds (Producer), Richard Landau (Screenwriter), A.E.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 22, 2007
The Glass Tomb:

"I want more chocolate!" says the sticky-faced tyke. "A clout is what you'll get!" says his frazzled mum. "Now turn around and watch the man starve like a good boy." The man is the great Sapolio, who is locked in a glass crypt determined to go 70 days without food. Pel Pelham (John Ireland) is selling tickets to this carny sideshow. He figures the pickings will be rich for 70 days as people pay to see whether Sapolio can hold out, give it up or die trying. However, there is one person who is going to opt for the last option. This man killed a young woman and he believes Sapolio may have glimpsed his face. Sapolio tells Pel and the police he cannot remember, but Pel knows Sapolio is a man who will never let things drop. Sooner or later Sapolio, locked in the glass cage with dozens of people staring at him, will finger the murderer. Sapolio may have considerably fewer than 70 days ahead of him. Except for John Ireland, a handful of interesting British actors, and an amusing but unlikely setup, this is all there is. There's no mystery; we know the killer. And because the writing and directing are so matter-of-fact, there's little energy and even less suspense.

Ireland made this British movie in 1955. It takes only 59 minutes to tell the tale but it often seems longer, especially when we're dealing with Ireland's precocious little boy and his loving but tremulous wife, played by Honor Blackman. Bits of the movie are just fine. Pel Pelham is an outsider, an unsuccessful promoter with something of a chip on his shoulder. He goes to wealthy bookmaker and old friend, Tony Lewis (Sid James) for some money to finance the Sapolio show. Tony writes him a check right then, but asks Pel to drop the "freaks" and come back and join him in the business.
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Paid to Kill is a decent film with good dialog, decent acting, and interesting story. The picture is just OK to look at, but the audio is very noisy. The Glass Tomb started with below-average picture, which was very grainy and soft; therefore, I did not continue watching it.
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Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 5 (The Glass Tomb / Paid to Kill)
This item: Hammer Film Noir Double Feature, Vol. 5 (The Glass Tomb / Paid to Kill)
Price: $14.99 $8.99
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