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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Phenomenal Modern Day Odyssey.
Odysseus Who? Atticus continues his modern day odyssey in Hammered, and Hearne's druid is making Homer's hero look like a little punk with his epic adventures. After all, even Odysseus didn't go after a full fledge god like Thor.

Too bad Dos Equis isn't an Irish brew because Atticus could definitely win the bid for the Most Interesting Man in the World. Delight...
Published on July 7, 2011 by Kale

versus
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I Wanted to Love This Book
Books 1 and 2 were amazing, and I had such high hopes for book 3. Sadly, this one does not live up to the previous 2.

It seems like Atticus does not do anything in this book. He's involved only because his friends need him to be, but without his own dog in the fight, he just sort of drifts along though the plot. It was great to find out why Thor had to die, but...
Published on April 29, 2012 by E. L. Sapp


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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Phenomenal Modern Day Odyssey., July 7, 2011
Odysseus Who? Atticus continues his modern day odyssey in Hammered, and Hearne's druid is making Homer's hero look like a little punk with his epic adventures. After all, even Odysseus didn't go after a full fledge god like Thor.

Too bad Dos Equis isn't an Irish brew because Atticus could definitely win the bid for the Most Interesting Man in the World. Delight in the oddities and misfortunes that have become Atticus' life. Drinks with Jesus. A Shakespearean duel with a vampire. Suggestive salad spinning with a young beautiful apprentice. A bareback ride on a giant squirrel. And getting slapped around by the Morrigan. Sounds like just another day for Atticus O'Sullivan.

The Iron Druid is a man of his word, and it's time to make good on some promises he made. Even if it kills him. First he has to retrieve a golden apple for a certain witch. Then Atticus is to escort Leif to Asgard to take on the patron God of Jerks. They'll pick up some backup along the way and introduce us to some new and endearing characters all with a grudge against Thor. And honestly when someone like Jesus concedes your a thundering D-Bag, you probably deserve the angry lynch mob coming for you.

But O'Sullivan's actions aren't without consequence. Not everyone will come out of the fray alive and with the possible relocation of the local coven, pack upheaval within the werewolf community, and vampire unrest in Arizona the cost of revenge could be too high. The wait for the next installment definitely too long.

Again I have to reccomend the audiobook version of this series. Hammered was just as excellently performed as Hounded, and Hexed. Kevin's words are pure magic when Luke Daniels is narrating them. He did another outstanding job with Atticus and company. I particularly liked his rendition of a giant squirrel which sounded a lot like a cross between the Chipmunks and Gollum. Lets face it Hearne doesn't make it easy on Daniels who has to voice multiple accents and languages. I love that a new deal is going to give us more Atticus, Kevin, and Luke to come.

Hearne's third effort is yet again another gem, embodying all that is awesome. Fans of the first two books will be pleased with Kevin's usual wit and candor. But he steps things up a bit, with the addition of some different POV's that shows Hearne's more serous side. The pace is a little slower than in the past but I think that is because of the grandeur of the task Atticus has to achieve. There's plenty of the action and unexpected quirkiness that comes with Hearne's twisted imagination, and his ability to blend mythos, theology, folklore, and pop culture is pure genius. As always you can tell Hearne did extensive homework for Hammered, or that he's an amazing literary con artist, either way the words he puts down on the page are completely believable.

With all the delicious threads planted for future tomes, the end will have you trying to conjure up more pages, and cursing the long year wait ahead.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I Wanted to Love This Book, April 29, 2012
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This review is from: Hammered (with bonus short story): The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book Three (Kindle Edition)
Books 1 and 2 were amazing, and I had such high hopes for book 3. Sadly, this one does not live up to the previous 2.

It seems like Atticus does not do anything in this book. He's involved only because his friends need him to be, but without his own dog in the fight, he just sort of drifts along though the plot. It was great to find out why Thor had to die, but that could have easily been covered "off-stage." The fight with the Norse gods, which was supposed to be the climax of the book, was over too fast, and little was done about the character deaths. ** SPOILER ALERT ** Those deaths were just glossed over; more time was spent trying to put Leif's head back together than was spent discussing the death of Gunnar! He just dies and Atticus goes on to the next step, as if the loss of his friend was nothing. (He seemed more concerned about how Hal would react to being alpha than he did about the fact his friend was killed in front of him.)

Also, Oberon, who was my favorite character in the previous books, barely appears in this one. I understand why Atticus could not take him, but not having the dog's comments left a hole in the book.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific 3rd book in the Iron Druid Chronicles, September 12, 2011
With Hounded & Hexed, Kevin Hearne has pretty much established himself as one of urban fantasy's best new voices. Not surprisingly, expectations were sky-high for Hammered, the third volume of The Iron Druid Chronicles.

Hammered begins with Atticus O'Sullivan undertaking a reconnaissance mission in Asgard. The plan is to retrieve a golden apple that would cancel his debt with the Indian witch Laksha, while also relieving Thor of his power and godhood. Unfortunately, like many of his past outings, the mission doesn't go as planned and Atticus ends up making things worse. His plan botched, Atticus returns to Arizona to settle some business before dealing with Thor. This involves Atticus' Third Eye bookstore and Granuaile MacTiernan, the latter of which is further explored in the short story, "A Test of Mettle". The book also features the return of the Jewish demon hunters from Hexed as well as the appearance of someone who will surprise many readers. Meanwhile, joining Atticus in his quest against Thor is Lief, Gunnar and three other very powerful individuals, thus setting the stage for Hammered...

Like its predecessors, Hammered features a liberal does of humor, which is one of the most consistently fun factors in The Iron Druid Chronicles, with the Irish wolfhound Oberon once again stealing most of the show with lines like "Anyplace is good so long as there's sausage and bitches", "Oh look it's a dead guy and a wet dog", and "Pai Mei's probably on Facebook right now, look him up." Despite the humor, The Iron Druid Chronicles has progressively become darker with each volume with Hammered the darkest book yet. The author never descends to all-out gore in Hammered, but there is lots of violence and death, tragic histories, depressing futures, and a more overall serious tone. Characterization meanwhile, remains superb as ever with Atticus leading the way. This time however, Magnus & Lief get to share center stage with Atticus, while five chapters from the POVs of five different characters lets readers see what others think about Thor, which was very rewarding. Story-wise, Hammered is the most epic and satisfying volume yet in The Iron Druid Chronicles, but the ending will leave readers salivating for the fourth volume, Tricked.

Negatively, nearly every book possesses some element that will rankle the reader. For me, the issues in Hounded and Hexed were fairly minor, but in Hammered, they are non-existent.

CONCLUSION: The Iron Druid Chronicles has been receiving praise all over the blogosphere. Praise that is richly deserved considering the series's memorable characters, entertaining humor, and surprising, action-packed story. As impressive as the series has been though, Kevin Hearne takes The Iron Druid Chronicles to a whole new level with the excellent Hammered...

BONUS REVIEW - "A Test Of Mettle":

A Test Of Mettle is featured in the e-book version of Hammered. The short story is about 9-10 pages long and occurs side-by-side with the latter half of Hammered. A Test of Mettle is narrated in the first-person by Granuaile MacTiernan, who must perform a task set to her by an elemental, while overcoming the expectations of the pantheon to which her new status is associated with. Accompanying Granuaile on her task is Oberon.

A Test Of Mettle reveals a small, but significant part of Granuaile's past which I believe might factor in future volumes. The pace of the story is rather fast and it was good to see Kevin give Granuaile a narrative voice distinctive from Atticus's. The short story also reveals a bit about a certain pantheon, which happens to establish Atticus's views of that pantheon from the earlier books. Overall, I thought A Test Of Mettle was a nice addition to Hammered, making an already great book even better...
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Such an unexpected disappointment, April 20, 2012
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Wow, was I disappointed with this book. I loved books 1 and 2 and was looking forward to this one. The last thing I expected was to be bored.

The first major problem with this book for me was that it was heavily plot driven but there was no through line to that plot. It was a set of sequences that didn't feel like they tied together. The sequence where Atticus stole the apple. {A sequence that I found completely uninteresting. I began to wonder if all my favorite characters (Oberon and Mrs. MacDonagh in particular) were going to appear at all.} The sequence where Atticus prepared to abandon Tempe. {My favorite sequence because of time spent with the above mentioned favorite characters.} And finally the sequence where Atticus led a bunch of people to attack and try to kill Thor.

The second major problem was that there weren't any real stakes for Atticus. This section should have been heavily character driven...we were told that Gunner and Lief had very strong personal reasons to try and kill Thor that we should have felt it. But the story was told first person by the one character that had zero personal stakes in the outcome. Atticus was like the only guy in the group with a car that promised to give his buddies a ride so they could rob a bank. He promised to 'give them a ride' (so to speak) and that's what he did. He never really seemed to care about what he was walking into, so why should I?

Jesus and The Morrigan both said....killing Thor is a bad idea, but there weren't any immediate consequences set forth for Atticus himself. The warnings didn't matter to Atticus enough for him to try to *do* anything to change the outcome. There was a lame discussion discussion with Lief, but that was it. "Hey, lets not do this. " "No, I have to" "Okay, fine we'll do this." Then the author stopped the story. He literally parked all the characters by a fire so he could introduce us to three brand new characters we'd met a page or two previously. At a point where the story should have been steam rolling in to a battle that had me on the edge of my seat and unwilling to put the book down I got several chapters, told in an emotionally detached way, telling us why these guys were there. It killed the momentum of the story and killed what little emotional connection I had begun to build with the story. Sadly the biggest joy to listening to this book in audio format was the fact that I could hit the fast forward button.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sooo awesome, August 2, 2011
I wasn't sure Kevin Hearne could keep up the awesomeness of of the Iron druid chronicles all the way through three novels, but boy oh boy did he deliver!
I am deeply depressed that I now have to wait at least a year for the next book! Noooo, how oh how shall I endure?
I am one of those strange beasts who loves a good cliffhanger but my friends, the end of Hammered is pure torture, I must find out what happens next. I must!

Hammered is more epic than the last two installments, the stakes have never been higher and Atticus is in for a hella wild ride. I love that the world that our favourite druid lives in isn't static, there are far reaching consequences for everything that he has done and Atticus and his peoples have to adjust and change to deal with everthing. I don't want this to be a spoilery review, so I will just say, that if you enjoyed the previous two iron druid chronicles, then this one will BLOW YOUR MIND!
If you are new to Kevin Hearne's books, I implore you to start with the first Hounded: The Iron Druid Chronicles It'll be too hard to follow if you don't start from the beginning.

I am in awe of the sheer breadth of mythology and characters and craziness that Kevin Hearne perfectly weaves into a gripping, fast-paced adventure. I read Hammered in one sitting, I simple couldn't put it down... I couldn't. I'm going to have to lie to my brother and tell him that I havent finished it yet, so I can do an immediate re-read before he gets his grubby mits on my favourite Urban Fantasy series of the year.

Read this book. YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed in this one; have loved the series, April 24, 2013
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I loved the first two books in this series. This one left me shaking my head. Atticus suddenly seems untrue to the character established earlier, making obviously lousy decisions and going off on exactly the kind of testosterone-poisoned violent spree that he has seemed both too smart for, and practiced in avoiding.

I like so much about this series, but I have been frustrated in each book by the way the author keeps two recurrent and interesting characters offstage - Oberon and Granuaille. Neither has more than a cameo in this one. I would rather go more deeply into the great characters Hearne has established and learn more about the pantheons we've already explored than be endlessly introduced to new ones at the expense of their development.

I'll keep reading, but I'm not as excited as I was about this series. I love Atticus' humor and insight, and I have really appreciated his balance of an essentially peaceful Druidic nature with bad-ass heroics. That balance seems entirely gone here.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Someone give that dog a bacon latte!, July 10, 2011
By 
H. Bala "Me Too Can Read" (Recently moved back to Carson, California, or as I call it... the center of the universe) - See all my reviews
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Don't think that Atticus O'Sullivan is letting his recent impressive deeds go to his head. In past weeks, the world's last Druid had polished off several gods and taken out a slew of formidable supernatural foes, all the while his snarky one-liners having reduced readers into stitches. Atticus, whose life span stretches back to more than two thousand years, clings to that bromide about discretion being the better part of valor. It's how he's survived this long. But the flip side is that he'd given his word, had vowed to a fearsome witch and to his undead attorney that, for services rendered, he would storm Valhalla (quietly) to steal Idunn's Golden Apples (which would confer immortality to the witch) and to slay Thor (because the thunder god is a callous asshat what vexed the attorney mightily a thousand years ago). HAMMERED tracks Atticus's attempt to live up his promise.

In the course of two books (HOUNDED and HEXED), writer Kevin Hearne has been subtly shaking things up. And, in HAMMERED, we learn that Atticus's recent actions have fair wrought worlds-shattering consequences. One of the best things about the Iron Druid Chronicles - and there's a lot here that's brilliant - is that Hearne has got this wild, all-inclusive mindset when it comes to building his world mythology. He inhabits it with bickering pantheons from diverse cultures, as well as various cultural folk heroes (like the Coyote who makes another cameo here). In HAMMERED, not only do we get practically the entire Norse divinity but, among others, appearances by the vengeful Roman god of wine, an obscure Slavic thunder god, an immortal Chinese kung-fu master, and the most influential Christian figure of them all (who ends up tossing down a brewski with Atticus).

Hearne deserves massive props for managing to seamlessly fit every character into his sprawling urban fantasy, and for making each one seem friggin' righteous. Those who eventually make up Atticus's strike team all have compelling motivations for being invested to the cause, and we finally learn the vampire attorney Leif Helgarson's ancient beef with the Norse thunder god. In the Iron Druid's reality, Thor absolutely merits a serious smiting. There are several chapters here, each dedicated to one of Atticus's commando team as each member regales the others with how Thor had done him wrong. And, more than in any other chapter, it's in the tragic tale of the forgotten Finnish god Väinämöinen that Thor truly reveals just how much of a thoughtless, brutal asshat he is. Incidentally, in that same chapter, Hearn's writing is so empathetic that he may have you lamenting what befalls a deep sea monster.

In my personal reckoning, Atticus O'Sullivan, by virtue of three ridiculously awesome books, has rapidly become my second favorite character in urban fantasy. He's right up there with Harry Dresden. Atticus is an ancient soul with a wicked sense of humor (although, as I've said time and again, his telepathically-linked Irish wolfhound Oberon is even funnier). Atticus has an intriguing skills set. As a Druid, he derives power directly from the earth. He shapeshifts and converses with the earth's elementals and wields two enchanted swords (and, by the end of HAMMERED, it looks as if he'll have gained a third weapon). His attorneys-on-retainer happen to be a werewolf and a vampire. All this - and other things besides - make Atticus O'Sullivan a force not to be effed with. Except that several friendly gods are advising Atticus against following thru on his mission, citing dire consequences and a prophecy about the world burning in thirteen years' time.

So the stakes are greater in HAMMERED, and irrevocable change wafts in the air and not everyone survives. Atticus is such a fleshed-out protagonist that you feel his distress at possibly having to pull up stakes, at the conflict he goes thru as his sense of self-preservation wars with his compulsion to abide by his oath to help Leif slay Thor. There's a sense of finality in how Atticus goes about putting his contingency plans into effect. The sarcastic humor is still prevalent - partly because Atticus will persist in taunting his foes - but the story soon enough takes on the tone of an epic quest. And when Atticus and crew reenact their own version of Ragnarok on the Norse gods, it is something to behold. Hearne's vivid detailing of the breathtaking battles are so good and visceral that you wish you could see it on cinema, except that, naturally, a film adaptation probably would just bungle it. I only wish that other supporting characters had made a bigger dent in the book - specifically, Oberon and Atticus's gorgeous apprentice, Granuaile - but Hearne was invested in chronicling Atticus's large scale undertaking, and this, I guess, leaves no room and is too perilous for a dog and a lowly student. And we do get to hang out more with the likes of Perun and Zhang Guo Lao, who are amazingly fun characters.

Thankfully, there's already a fourth novel in the works, titled TRICKED, what with Del Rey Books having signed Hearne to three more Iron Druid installments. TRICKED is scheduled for an April 2012 release, but if you can't wait that long, then just punch up "Clan Rathskeller" on the net. It's a holiday-minded short story featuring the Iron Druid, and it takes place ten months before HOUNDED. Odds are that you'll like it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Needs an Editor BADLY & An Understanding of Modern Paganism even more, May 13, 2013
By 
Jeffrey (Oshkosh, WI, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hammered (with bonus short story): The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book Three (Kindle Edition)
The first novel in this series was wonderful. An academic who could write! And the rarely used Celtic tradition to boot. The main character was different from most in the genre, Hearne was great in dropping in pop culture references, and if the Iron Druid borrowed a but too much from Harry Dresdon, well so what? Hounded was a 5 star book.

Hexed was also wonderful, but showed some signs of what was to come. The pop culture references were getting too heavy, the in-jokes too cloying, and the weirdness started showing up. What's up with the Thor vendetta? I should have known this was a bad sign of things to come.

Still, I quickly bought Hammered, book 3, and this time I couldn't finish the book. First, Hearne desperately needs an editor who will reign him on the weird tangents. Some pop culture jokes are a great plus in a book. Every other page is getting ridiculous. The vendetta against poor old Thor--a deity who protected the Vaneir and wandered the earth feeding and warding the poor--was mystifying. His lawyer wanted him to off Thor? A lawyer? C'mon. Of course, that the lawyer in question was a vampire was type casting, but still... C'mon. Then our hero kills the spider who served as the messenger to the gods and, inexcusably, kills the Norns or Fates. The Iron Druid as a psychokiller blissfully destroying eons old pantheons? What an idiot! But ok, I know the author can write, so I read on hoping something would make sense out of all this.

But the disrespect to the Norse gods became too smugly cloying and then we are introduced to Jesus, who hangs out at the bar with this moron and amuses the Iron Druid by doing some cheap magic tricks which parody the biblical loaves and fishes by making of them a whimpy burger (for the young, this was an ancient cartoon character whose handle was "I will gladly pay you on Tuesday for a hamburger today"). That was enough.

As the author is an academic, I would tell him directly the problem in academicese so he might understand it. It's great to have a pagan (or Heathen to be PC in the Asatru world) novel which does not privilege Christianity. And portraying the Norse pantheon as less than the Celtic is fine too. But to disrespect the Norse pantheon by murdering major archetypes is not acceptable. More, treating Christianity with such disrespect is no better, and no worse, than the treatment of the Norse.Neither is necessary, neither is funny, and neither is acceptable.
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I really think the author's motivation for portraying Thor in such a light and feeling justification for the whole 'lets kill the Norse gods is a reference to contemporary Odinism that presents the Norse tradition in a racist way. However, Asatru, that worships the same pantheon of Norse gods, is NOT racist and the Asatruers outnumber the Odinists (whose numbers are growing primarily in the prisons and among 1 percenter biker gangs). I suspect Hearne does not know this otherwise the idiotic vendetta against Thor could have been avoided and the whole battle against the Vaineer motif could have been abandoned in favor of a more sensible plot.
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That is the last book in this series, and by this author, that I plan to read. He really needs an editor that will go the the faculty club and tell him that the bar is closed, go home and write something sensible or it won't be published. There is a reason that Neil Gaiman had the wisdom to pull the Christianity chapter out of American Gods. With maturity, Hearne might figure out the blessings of self control also. Without this, the Iron Druid is heading for John Norman status. He can write (unlike Norman), but he has one book's worth of things to say and an endless number of sequels to keep saying it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The hilarious hijinx of Atticus and Oberon are always worth a listen!, December 29, 2013
This installment pours on the geeky with its abundant Sci-Fi Fantasy references, and even though a lot of the LORD OF THE RINGS and STAR TREK shout-outs were lost on me, my guy has now taken up reading this series so kudos to Hearne for spanning multiple genres! This author’s wacky sense of humour is also another huge draw for me; between Oberon’s love for b***** and sausages, and Atticus’ questions about vampire poop, it’s impossible to not crack a smile while listening to HAMMERED. And, last but not least, there’s Luke Daniels’ priceless narration of Ratatosk the giant squirrel! If that doesn’t get you laughing, well, you may just be a lost cause.

I’ve come to thoroughly enjoy Kevin Hearne’s personal spin on the various myths he covers in THE IRON DRUID CHRONICLES. This time around, Atticus finds himself sneaking into Asgard to steal a golden apple by riding a giant squirrel up the roots of the world tree. His literal interpretation of an ancient lore seems downright insane at first but he quickly proves his skeptics wrong and thus his outrageous plan to defeat Thor is born. Each of the four characters that team-up with the druid in their quest for vengeance gets a full chapter to tell their vendetta tales which I found to be extremely interesting. I always enjoy a good “how I became a werewolf / vampire” story.

Oberon doesn’t play as large of a role in this book as he has in previous installments which made his doggie moments all the more precious. I wish there’d been more of them but Atticus helped to pick-up the slack by being even more outspoken than usual. Readers also get to learn a bit more about Tahira, O’Sullivan’s long lost love which helped to add some depth to his character. I’ve now come to accept that my favourite druid won’t be pairing up with a lady friend anytime soon but as long as Hearne continues to pepper his stories with goddess sexy times my appetite for romp scenes will remain satisfied.

Luke Daniels’ versatility as the narrator of these audiobooks continues to amaze me; all of his character voices are distinctly identifiable whether he’s reading from a dog’s POV or that of Ratatosk. I have to give this man serious props for not sounding like Alvin the Chipmunk while he narrated the latter’s dialogue! Hearne’s multifaceted writing style can’t be easy to convey but Daniels tackles every nutty curve ball with ease.

HAMMERED’s ending was bittersweet, even though they are successful in reaching their end goal, the price of their success was extremely high. Lots of characters die, including a few secondary ones, and I was left feeling skeptical about how the Mrs McDunnah cliffhanger will play-out in the future. Although, this wasn’t my favourite installment, the hilarious hijinx of Atticus and Oberon are always worth a listen and I took comfort in learning that there’s beer in Irish heaven!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The best so far, April 22, 2013
There is only one way I can do this and thats just to list the good and the bad of this book. I enjoyed the first two books in this series and I intend to keep reading the rest of the series but I do not see them as the perfect books so many others do.

The Good.
1.Atticus is finally acting his age (more or less). He doesn't come across as a self obsessed, vain, pompous, college kid (as much) in this book as he has in others.
2.The stakes are actually there, were in the other books you never really felt like anything bad could happen if this failed.
3. There is an actual climax in this book, unlike the others which had an end but it felt weak and lack luster.
4. There are not nearly as man "stub your toe moments" in this book. SYTM are a term I use to refer to a moment in a book or film that just makes you roll your eyes or question your reasoning.
5. It has an ending that makes you really want to read the next one, that is something the first two severely lacked.

The Bad. * spoilers*
1. There are no consequences for his actions, Atticus is warned about killing Thor and the effect it will have but he doesn't seem to care. Lief gets smashed to a fine paste, but thats ok he lived.
2. The Norse hate is heavy in this book. It has been obvious to me from the beginning that the author didn't like the Norse but in this book he goes at it with both barrels. From easily slaughtering half of the Norse pantheon and playing them up as inept morons to saying Freja wasn't pretty. He spends plenty of time remarking on the Celtic Goddesses beauty and skill in battle but Thor was a pussy.
3. Inconsistent use of mythology. Sometimes the mythology is spot on and other times it goes way out in left field. Take for example the death of Heimdall, the God that can sense foes coming from miles away is quickly ambushed and killed. Celtic magic beats Norse magic somehow.
5. Atticus and his allies are overpowered. Atticus has always been too powerful but that is a result of the author living through him but his companions in this book are also grossly overpowered. Lief goes toe to toe with Thor a God who is known for his strenght and wears a belt that doubles it. Atticus slaughters several Valkyries warrior maidens clad in magic armour. Freyr and Try Gods known for their swordsmanship are easily defeated. Yes some of the companions are Gods but it is remarked upon that the Norse are stronger than them hence why they went in a group.
6. Atticus blames the Norse Gods for the slaughter stating that had Thor been willing to fight them on his own they never would have had to kill them. They never challenged Thor to single combat and they never planned to, they invade Asgard with an army of giants and stomped Heimdall into mush and then set about slaughtering the rest of the Gods.

Conclusion. Norse hate aside the book is the best of the series thus far and I am interested to see how things all play out in the next three definitely worth a read.
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