Buy Used
$11.95
Used: Good | Details
Sold by 2swellguys
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ****Former library item. May contain identifying stickers, library barcodes or other markings on the case, artwork and/or disc.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Handel: Israel in Egypt
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Handel: Israel in Egypt Box set


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, Box set, October 15, 1990
"Please retry"
$49.08 $1.68

Product Details

  • Performer: David Thomas [bass], Jeremy White, Emily Van Evera, Nancy Argenta, Anthony Rolfe Johnson
  • Orchestra: Taverner Consort Choir, Taverner Consort Players
  • Conductor: Andrew Parrott
  • Composer: George Frideric Handel
  • Audio CD (October 15, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Box set
  • Note on Boxed Sets: During shipping, discs in boxed sets occasionally become dislodged without damage. Please examine and play these discs. If you are not completely satisfied, we'll refund or replace your purchase.
  • Label: Emi
  • ASIN: B000008TWK
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #448,777 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON VINE VOICE on April 20, 2008
This is the third performance of Israel in Egypt in my collection; and it may be that three is the magic number where this work is concerned, because it is only with this recording that I have finally made sense of the piece. Along with a performance that I once attended in London, the other two recordings treat Israel in Egypt as a two-part work. So, if I recall, does Percy Young in his Master Musicians book on Handel; and so, very significantly, does Tovey. Writing during the depth of the reaction against Handel, Tovey finds Israel in Egypt to be a patchy and incoherent oratorio, a thing of peaks and troughs making an unconvincing and abrupt start with no overture. Dismissing as absurd Handel's own proposal to preface it with the great and lengthy Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline, Tovey used the Dead March from Saul and went on his way, if not exactly rejoicing, then at least satisfied.

I am in no doubt that my own opinion has been overly influenced by Tovey down the years, but I also note Shaw's grumpy remark that at least Handel had been able to bring some musicality to a project that was basically unmusical. Shaw was much less susceptible to orthodoxy than Tovey was, but when two critics of such contrasted eminence come to such similar conclusions I have to think that there really is some kind of, I do not say problem, but at least issue here. The issue I now believe to be that Handel knew what he was doing, and that Israel in Egypt is incomprehensible without its intended first element, an adapted version of the Funeral Anthem.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Leslie Richford on November 23, 2004
Occasionally I have heard the ridiculous charge levelled against Andrew Parrott (and Joshua Rifkin, to name but one other leading early music conductor) that he performs Bach with one singer to a part 'in order to save money'. But if there were even a grain of truth in this, it would be safe to assume that he would perform Handel equally thriftily. Yet Andrew Parrott brought together a total of almost 80 (in words: eighty) performers in London's Abbey Road studios in 1989 for this opulent recording of Handel's choral oratorio 'Israel in Egypt' (1738/39). The reason for this is obvious: with Handel as with Bach, Parrott is being guided by the historical evidence. Bach in Leipzig had only very limited forces available to him; Handel in London was able to draw on a large supply of singers and musicians. The Taverner Choir on this recording consists of 12 female sopranos, four each of male and female altos, six tenors and six basses (plus five additional soloists; bass Jeremy White sings both as a soloist and in the choir). And the distribution of the Taverner Players is 7 first violins, 6 second violins, 5 violas, 3 violoncellos, 2 double basses, 2 transverse flutes, 4 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 natural trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani, harpsichord and 2 organs. The result is an opulent sound that has nothing to do with any form of 'minimalism' and underscores the fact that Andrew Parrott is one of today's leading baroque interpreters. This is further evidenced by the care which has gone into this recording, which includes 'Part One', the revised version of the 'Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline' which presumably was Handel's original inspiration for the whole oratorio.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Peter von Karajan on May 13, 2004
This is a review taken from a prestigious spanish magazine devoted to Classical Music called "AMADEUS" (great name). Indeed, it is a great issue, and you'll enjoy reading it if you're able to read spanish; the magazine always brings a CD, with great performances of great works; example: Mahler, Synf.6 with Haitink and Orchestre National de Paris, or Magnificat with Rilling... anyway, i don't mean to promote it here. Here is the review:
1) In English: Re-issue, this time at half prized series, of one of the greatest readings of this purely choral oratorio of Händel. Parrot, simply terrifies and tears you down; he make us live with him the drama of the jews in land of the Pharaoh by the hand of a marvelous Tarverner Choir. A Reference, with any doubt at all. Performance 5 of 5; Purity of Sound: 5 of 5
2) In Spanish: Reedición, esta vez en serie medie, de una de las grandes lecturas de este oratorio eminentemente coral de Händel. Parrot sencillamente arrasa y avasalla, nos hace vivir con él el drama de los judios en tierra de los faraones de la mano de un fabuloso Coro Taverner. Referencial, sin ninguna duda. Interpretación 5 de 5; Sonido 5 de 5.
In my words: a great perfomarce, authentic, truthful and with soul above it all. A disc that anyone who enjoys baroque music must have, even if he doesn't like Händel at all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nefari on April 27, 2003
A flawless recording. Extremely low noise, no artifacts. Exquisite performance by the Taverner choir and players.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?