Happiness at Work and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$17.06
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $10.89 (39%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Happiness at Work: Maximi... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success Paperback – April 5, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0470749463 ISBN-10: 0470749466 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $17.06
39 New from $13.72 30 Used from $1.31
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.06
$13.72 $1.31
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
$17.06 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success + Psychological Capital: Developing the Human Competitive Edge
Price for both: $41.27

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (April 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470749466
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470749463
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #812,528 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Sharing the results of her four-year research journey in simple, jargon-free language, Pryce-Jones exposes the secrets of being happy at work.
  • Focuses on what happiness really means in a work context and why it matters to individuals and organisations in both human and financial terms
  • Equips readers with the information, knowledge and skills to make the most of the nearly 100,000 hours that they'll spend at work over a lifetime
  • Demystifies psychological research through a fascinating array of  anecdotes, case studies, and interviews from people in the trenches of the working world, including business world-leaders, politicians, particle physicists, and philosophers, sheep farmers, waitresses, journalists, teachers, and lawyers, to name just a few

How You Can Achieve Happiness at Work
Amazon-exclusive content from author Jessica Pryce Jones

The Five Keys to Happiness at Work

Contribution – the effort you make and your perception of it

Conviction – the motivation and resilience you have whatever the circumstances

Culture – how well you feel you fit

Commitment – knowing you’re there for the duration

Confidence – the level of self-belief you have

But how should you apply them?

If you’re looking for a short-cut for how to get the most out of the 100,000 hours or so you’ll spend at work over the course of your life, here are my four top tips:

1. Remember that happiness comes first. In other words your attitude and mindset are vital. Who wants to work around a miserable and unhappy person all day long? I’m sure you don’t. And if happiness comes first, it’s not about when/then thinking, for example ‘when I’ve got a promotion, then I’ll be happy.’ It’s the here and now that matters.

2. Think about what really motivates you; is it feeling competent? Or connected to the people you work with? Perhaps it’s knowing you have choices, or most likely it’s a combination of all three. Figure out what works most for you and make sure you nurture that.

3. Notice when you feel your best at work; what are you doing? What circumstances have to be in place for that to happen? How can you build this into your daily working situation?

4. Remember that doing difficult things is how you grow and stretch your comfort zone. If you never do that you’ll shrink your confidence, so go for what’s difficult, not what’s safe and easy.

Review

"After reading this book, I certianly did not need any more convincing that happiness at work matters. I am usually wary of self-help books, but the author's message is too simple to be ignored. . . Read this book, take action and get happier at work." (Edge, 1 September 2011)

"Pryce-Jones, who is among a growing number of experts studying the connection between happiness and productivity in the workplace, suggests there's a significant difference between happiness and engagement." (Human Resource Executive Online, October 2010)

"This book is a useful addition to the array of books published in recent years the objective of which is to help folks who are not social scientists or clinical therapists understand happiness as a concept and how the research thereon over the past few decades can be used to achieve greater levels of personal happiness and the successes in life that go therewith." (Social Indicators Network News, May 2010)

"The author undertook an enormous five year study of the concept and implications of happiness at both work and at home. The result of the intensive interviews underlined the critical importance of workplace happiness, and its correlation with a happier personal life." (Blog Business World, June 2010)

"Normally I pick a book up, read the first few pages, then find I can't face it and end up leaving it in a hotel room. But this book, I picked it up, started to read it and I thought, ‘Hallelujah! Here is a book that makes sense at last.' And that was just so refreshing. I don't even have a copy at the moment, because I have given about ten of them away to people saying, ‘You have just got to read this!'" (Fivebooks.com, June 2010)

“So, if you want a workplace filled with happy workers who are more productive, engaged and willing to contribute, then you need to read this wonderful book by Jessica Pryce-Jones.” (Inside Personal Growth, May 2010)

“Everyone gripes about work, but Jessica Pryce-Jones, founder of British human-asset management consultancy iOpener, discovered that, believe it or not, work makes us happy. In her straightforward examination of the relationships among work, productivity and happiness, she takes readers on a journey through the core elements of happiness at work, ultimately tasking them with reaching their own happy place.” (Kirkus Living Well Supplement, June 2010)

"Whether you’re an individual who wants to enjoy the personal benefits that derive from happiness or part of a management team that recognizes the direct correlation between happiness and productivity, Happiness at Work is the essential guide to understanding this once-elusive subject." (HR.com, April 2010)

"An excellent study in employee happiness. There is a lot of value to be gained from this book." (Teach the Soul, April 2010)

"A useful and informative guide in helping employers create environments and structures that keep employees happy and productive." (Basil & Spice, April 2010)

"Sharing the results of her four–year research journey in simple, jargon–free language, [Pryce-Jones] exposes unexpected secrets about being happy at work." (StrategyDriven, April 2010)

"[Pryce-Jones] demystifies the latest research, illustrating her findings with a fascinating array of over 80 revealing interviews." (The CEO Refresher, April 2010)

"A fascinating new book based on many years of consulting and coaching experience … .Packed with case studies." (CNNMoney.com, April 2010)

"Good trainer that she is, Pryce-Jones works hard to convert knowledge to understanding, and finally, to practical action. This is a 'How To' book for grown-ups who recognise they can try harder and deserve better." (Management Today, February 2010)

"A very good book for understanding aspects of work that traditionally aren't considered 'important.' And if you're struggling with a job (either new or long-term) that doesn't seem to have that 'spark,' you may find out why (as well as how to change yourself and get re-centered)." (Duffbert's Random Musings, March 2010)

“Everyone gripes about work, but Jessica Pryce-Jones, founder of British human-asset management consultancy iOpener, discovered that, believe it or not, work makes us happy. In her straightforward examination of the relationships among work, productivity and happiness, she takes readers on a journey through the core elements of happiness at work, ultimately tasking them with reaching their own happy place.” (Kirkus Living Well Supplement, June 2010)

"Whether you’re an individual who wants to enjoy the personal benefits that derive from happiness or part of a management team that recognizes the direct correlation between happiness and productivity, Happiness at Work is the essential guide to understanding this once-elusive subject." (HR.com, April 2010)

"An excellent study in employee happiness. There is a lot of value to be gained from this book." (Teach the Soul, April 2010)

"A useful and informative guide in helping employers create environments and structures that keep employees happy and productive." (Basil & Spice, April 2010)

"Sharing the results of her four–year research journey in simple, jargon–free language, [Pryce-Jones] exposes unexpected secrets about being happy at work." (StrategyDriven, April 2010)

"[Pryce-Jones] demystifies the latest research, illustrating her findings with a fascinating array of over 80 revealing interviews." (The CEO Refresher, April 2010)

"A fascinating new book based on many years of consulting and coaching experience … .Packed with case studies." (CNNMoney.com, April 2010)

"Good trainer that she is, Pryce-Jones works hard to convert knowledge to understanding, and finally, to practical action. This is a 'How To' book for grown-ups who recognise they can try harder and deserve better." (Management Today, February 2010)

"A very good book for understanding aspects of work that traditionally aren't considered 'important.' And if you're struggling with a job (either new or long-term) that doesn't seem to have that 'spark,' you may find out why (as well as how to change yourself and get re-centered)." (Duffbert's Random Musings, March 2010)


More About the Author

I'm currently the founder and CEO of iOpener a consultancy that focuses on people and performance. We're in the business of human asset management - in other words we help others to help others. Because that's what truly makes a difference at work.

I became interested in what makes people tick and tick better at work when I had a job working for an alcoholic, chain-smoking boss. After 10 months of this I jumped ship and worked for someone I respected, admired and whom I still see 25 years later. Even then I wondered about what really made me want to make an effort and what closed me to that possibility - and it sparked a long-term interest in finding out.

I'd always wanted to set up my own business even though when I was 26 I couldn't see how that might happen. But as Covey said, 'start with the end in mind' and somehow the rest all fell into place. Of course I've had a lot of lucky breaks on the way, and I think that this has been helped by not being afraid to ask. Not to mention finding some fabulous supportive colleagues too.

Writing the book was something I really wanted to do because we had so much information and knowledge gleaned from our years of experience. And I thought what a pity it would be if only those who could afford it had access to it. So I sat down to write a book that would be useful to anyone who had a job. Which I hope means you too.

Please write to me if you'd like to share your experience as I'm always interested to hear. You can contact me at jess.prycejones@iopener.com. And if you'd like to learn to deliver what we do inside or outside your organization, we'd love to hear from you too.

Meanwhile I hope you enjoy 'Happiness At Work' and that you walk away with some new ideas and practical tools to boost your personal success.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
This book sheds new light on the transformational effect of happiness in the workplace.
MFCW
This ended up being one of those books... Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success by Jessica Pryce-Jones.
Thomas Duff
The findings were that the people who contribute the most, that is work the hardest are the happiest at work.
John Chancellor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By John Chancellor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
Our work is such a significant part of our lives; it is important what we consider our Happiness at Work. From the employer's point of view, the difference in productivity between those workers who consider themselves happy and those who do not is very significant. Happy workers have more positive impact on all facets of work therefore the employer must consider "the what and how" of fostering Happiness at Work.

Happiness at Work is the result of an in-depth research study undertaken by the author Jessica Pryce-Jones and her associates.

There are some startling findings from this study that clearly demonstrate the importance of studying and understanding the factors that contribute to happiness at work. For example, "If you are really happy at work, you'll be 180 percent happier with life overall, have 180 percent more energy and be nearly 50 percent more productive than your less happy colleagues."

So what are the factors? According to the study there are 5 Cs that form the basis or foundation for happiness at work. They are contribution, conviction, culture, commitment and confidence. The findings were that the people who contribute the most, that is work the hardest are the happiest at work.

For each factor in the 5 Cs, there is a complete discussion and the results of their study.

After the 5Cs, comes Pride, Trust and Recognition. You must have pride in where you work, you must trust your employer and you must receive recognition for your efforts. And the last piece is "Achieving Your Potential". You will not be happy at work unless you feel you are achieving your potential.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
On occasion, I'll be offered a book for reading/reviewing that seems to come at a very opportune time. This ended up being one of those books... Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success by Jessica Pryce-Jones. There's no argument that the typical workplace has changed dramatically in the last few years, and I know my reactions have changed along with it. I've been having problems trying to wrap my thoughts around the "why" and "what now" aspects, and this book has given me some new perspectives and insights on things.

Contents:
Prologue; Why Happiness at Work? Why Now?; The Research Journey; Contribution from the Inside-Out; Contribution from the Outside-In; Conviction; Culture; Commitment; Confidence; Pride, Trust, and Recognition; Achieving Your Potential; Happiness at Work: A Conclusion; What Next; References Dramatis Personae; Index

Pryce-Jones bases her work on 5 Cs that form the basis for your level of happiness at work:

- Contribution - your effort and achievement (inside-out) as well as respect and appreciation (outside-in)
- Conviction - your motivation and feeling that you make a difference
- Culture - your work environment and how well you fit into that culture in terms of behavior and interactions
- Commitment - feeling that what you're doing is worthwhile, as well as having a positive feeling towards the work and organization
- Confidence - belief that you can handle the jobs, tasks, and interactions expected of you

Wrapped around these 5Cs are the concepts of Pride, Trust, and Recognition. Pride is having the feelings of value based on what you do and where you're headed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on May 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
Dread and unhappiness are the biggest barriers to productivity. "Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success" is a guide to keeping one's spirits up throughout one's career. With simple and straight forward language, Jessica Pryce-Jones comes at readers with a massive an assortment of tips and tricks, and explains why happiness matters and why doing something you hate for prolonged periods of time is not going to do you any favors. "Happiness at Work" is an intriguing and thoughtful read on workplace morale, a top pick for any career psychology collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
I selected Amabile's admonition as the title of this review because I think it offers the single best career advice anyone has as yet devised. It also suggests what may well be the single greatest challenge that business leaders now face: How to get the work to be done in proper alignment with strategic objectives but also in alignment with the talents, skills, temperament, and experience of those best qualified to do that work?

Many years ago, then chairman and CEO of Southwest Airlines, Herb Kelleher, said "If we take good care of our people, they'll take good care of our customers, and our customers will take good care of our shareholders." Year after year, Fortune ranks Southwest Airlines among the companies that are most admired, the best to work for, etc. It is no coincidence that its cap value and profits are greater than those of the next nine airlines...combined.

Now consider the results of recent research conducted by highly reputable firms that include Gallup and Towers Perrin: on average, about 25-30% of employees in a U.S workplace are actively and productively engaged and about 35-40% are passively engaged (doing as little as necessary to stay employed); as for the others, they are actively disengaged, with many of them hostile and having a toxic effect within and beyond their workplace. Companies such as Southwest Airlines, Nordstrom's, The Container Store, SAS, Edward Jones, Wegmans, and Google have no problems with employee engagement.

All this serves as an introduction to Jessica Pryce-Jones's book, Happiness at Work, in which she explains with rigor and eloquence how to maximize "psychological capital for success.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again