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Happy Hour of the Damned Paperback – February 26, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 307 pages
  • Publisher: Kensington; 1ST edition (February 26, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0758225229
  • ISBN-13: 978-0758225221
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,050,374 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Call them the splatterati--werewolves who always know what to wear, zombies with bodies to die for, and vampires who know their fang shui--just don't call them late when it comes to happy hour, or the drinks might be on you."

About the Author

Mark Henry recently traded a career in the helping profession to scar minds with his fiction. He attributes his ideas to premature exposure to horror movies, and/or witnessing adult cocktail parties in the '70s. He's been further formed by surviving earthquakes, typhoons, and two volcanic eruptions. Happy Hour Of The Damned is his first novel. He, surprisingly, lives and breathes today in the Pacific Northwest with his wife and two dogs.

More About the Author

Mark traded a career in the helping profession to scar minds with his fiction. He attributes his ideas to premature exposure to horror movies, and/or witnessing adult cocktail parties in the '70s. His development has been further skewed by surviving earthquakes, typhoons, and two volcanic eruptions. Despite being disaster prone, he somehow continues to live and breathe. Residing in the oft maligned, yet not nearly as soggy as you'd think, Pacific Northwest, with his wife and two furry monsters that think they're children.

Customer Reviews

I really enjoyed this book, it has a lot of twisted humor in it.
Phyllis Jackson
I think the biggest thing I have an issue with is, okay, male author, main character female, and yet she talks, acts, and thinks like a guy on hormones.
CeeCee
I bought my book actually at Goodwill, hoping it was a good read and I wasn't disappointed.
Rachel Scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Richelle Mead on February 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
If you're like me, you've always thought that the hot, flirty action on Sex and the City was missing one essential thing: humans getting eaten by zombies. Finally, someone has breached the gap in that field of entertainment, and his name is Mark Henry.

Happy Hour of the Damned follows ad exec Amanda Feral as she adjusts to life as one of the living dead, following an unfortunate slip in a parking lot. Amanda's a sassy, no-nonsense heroine with a taste for both quality fashion and human flesh. Her friends, vampire Gil and zombie Wendy, are fantastic, and the trio provides non-stop wit and banter as they unravel the mystery of what's happened to a missing friend.

Mark's easy writing style captures Amanda's voice perfectly and makes this urban fantasy book hard to put down. If you like your humor a little dark and twisted, you've come to the right place--and you'll never look at Starbucks the same way again.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Jackie Kessler on February 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
In case you missed it above:

"Gruesome, ghoulish and utterly groundbreaking. Mark Henry is daring and scathingly funny." --Jackie Kessler

I really, really enjoyed this book. It's dark and macabre, and seriously twisted -- which in my world makes it damn near perfect. Amanda isn't your average heroine. She's unapologetically biting -- both in her humor and her food choices -- and she's got a brutal fashion sense and a fine appreciation for booze. What makes the story really work for me is that Amanda is more than a well-dressed vehicle for a scathing one-liner: she changes over the course of the book. She grows, bless her dead little heart.

Like I said, the humor is dark. If EVIL DEAD is your thing, I bet you'll love this book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Emily Jo Scalzo on December 29, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This male writer seems to think that all women are catty bitches caught up in fashion. It's like Mean Zombies, except that was at least well-written, and the characters in Mean Girls at least had some redeemable qualities. Not so here. The characters here are all devoid of conscience and prejudiced, and act more like petulant children than women.

When I saw the plethora of footnotes, I was disheartened to start out, but then I hated the main character and her friends after about 2 pages. I spent the rest of what I was willing to stomach reading wishing them death. (It wasn't much.)

Instead of focusing on the plot or anything meaningful, far more attention is given to what the characters are wearing and what their genitalia look like. It could have been an interesting plot, if the characters (all of them) didn't suck, and if it hadn't been sidelined by the characters' trivial concerns.

Writer needs to stick with writing what he knows, and women aren't it.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Todd Thomas on February 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
Notice that most of the other reviews are from really highly ranked, strong selling fantasy authors? That says a lot about the quality of this book. It's not only a fun read, but it's a well-crafted fantasy world that would be great to inhabit, except for the flesh-eating divas.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By R. Kyle TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
The only thing I've thought those two words had in common was the starting letter, but "Happy Hour of the Damned" has convinced me that yes, footnotes can be funny.

There are 132 footnotes in "Happy Hour's" 290 pages. Before that scares you off, they cover everything from undead abbreviations (USO: Unknown Supernatural Origin) to explaining that an 'my eyes mid-roll' is "standard operating procedure for show of irritability." They range from "don't have anything in your mouth when you're reading them" to "oh, why did I stop reading the wonderful narrative to look?"

Footnotes are just the tip of the iceberg of what makes "Happy Hour" different. Mark Henry's also included drink recipes and playlists in exhibit frames on several pages.

Bluntly, this should NOT work, but it does. There's everything here to distract you from the narrative. Amanda is both learning how to be a zombie and trying to find a lost succubus, named Liesl. The zombie lessons include such things as what not to eat--just about anything but booze, which really isn't a problem since alcoholism runs in the family--to how to spackle yourself back together when your undead skin's been damaged.

We've also got delightfully labeled flashbacks, occasional lists (OCD much?) and strange twists and turns in abundance. But, Henry's timing is exquisite--just when you're about to get totally lost, he throws you a bone and sucks you back into the main plot.

Amanda Feral is your typical catty, clothes and cars conscious, self-involved chick lit heroine who tripped on a donut box that she tossed away for someone else to pick up and died. (God I love poetic justic, don't you?) She was so twisted in life, she was having a delicious affair with her therapist, Martin Allende.
Read more ›
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. J. Green on February 28, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Don't judge this book by it's cover........Clearly the art department had a few too many sips from Amanda's Pimp Cup. I could not put this book down! Snarky, Quick, Urban Poetry. I think this is the wittiest comedy in disguise I have ever read. I can't wait for more undead antics. LOVED LOVED LOVED IT!!!!!!!!!!!!! More Please!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Renee C. Mulhare on July 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
There's a lot of flaws in this book, but for all of them -- a flashback that would have worked better if it had been broken up into segments and paced throughout the book, more expletives than was really necessary, a mystery plot that gets itself lost -- the characters are a riot! Amanda Feral, the foul-mouthed fashionista turned ghoul debutante, makes me, by turns, want to blow her empty little ghoul head off with a "boom-stick", and laugh out loud at her quips.

This is definately urban fantasy chick lit, or a playful satire of chick lit. Jim Butcher's "Dresden Files" it isn't, so come prepared for a froofy plot with a lot of naughty innuendo, ghoulish black comedy and gleeful gruesomeness. The world-building is what really saves this book: who'd 've thunk sexy zombies might lurk in our midst, clubbing crazy-themed clubs with their fellow preternaturals?
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