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Happy to Meet, Sorry to Part

HorslipsAudio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)


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Audio CD, Import, 2008 $74.35  
Audio CD, 2008 --  
Vinyl, 1973 --  

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 13, 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Wounded Bird Records
  • ASIN: B0013KCCO8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #320,427 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Happy to Meet
2. Hall of Mirrors
3. The Clergy's Lamentation
4. An Bratack Bán
5. The Shamrock Shore
6. Flower Amang Them All
7. Bim Istizh Az Ól
8. Furniture
9. Ace and Deuce
10. Dance to Yer Daddy
11. High Reel
12. Scalloway Ripoff
13. The Musical Priest
14. Sorry to Part

Editorial Reviews

2008 reissue of the Irish rockers' debut album, originally released in 1973. Horslips are a rock group from Dublin, Ireland who have released quite a few well-received Celtic flavored albums in their career. Though their commercial heyday was in the '70s, their legions of fans still shiver at the mention of their name. 14 tracks. Wounded Bird.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
(10)
4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Horslips was a group way ahead of its time. In the 1970s they took traditional Irish folk tunes and, while employing a bewildering array of traditional instruments, added a splattering of electric guitars and hard driving bass lines, injecting an intensity until then unseen in the realm of folkdom. It was a marriage made in heaven - hard rock tends to lack melody and traditional folk music tends to lack energy. By combining the two, we have the best of both worlds. Unfortunately, other than a single FM hit "King of Morning, Queen of Day", the Horslips sound never really caught on with the masses. Perhaps sensing impending doom and in a futile attempt to reach a wider audience, they eventually dropped the Irish folk melodies altogether, switched to dull, nondescript hard rock, and quickly faded from the scene. By 1980 Horslips was a complete bust. "Happy to Meet, Sorry to Part" is their debut album (1973) and although it is essentially a traditional folk album and lacks the polish of later works, it is interesting in the surprising number of influences it employs. While there is an overall gentle, jazzy, laid-back feel to the album, certain songs such as "The High Reel" (omitted on CD), "The Musical Priest", and "Bim Istigh Ag ol" lay the foundation for their more high energy sound which was further refined and developed on subsequent albums. "Ah Bratach Ban" has a bluegrass feel; "Ace & Duece" sounds like something straight out of the Middle Ages; "Bim Istig Ag ol" would fit quite nicely on Jethro Tull's "Stand Up" album; and "Dance to Yer Daddy" beckons the three-part harmonies of church choirs. Read more ›
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Irish folk marries rock: their first offspring July 8, 2005
Format:Audio CD
When I first heard this, in the wonderful l.p. version that was die cut like a concertina, it made me proud. In the era of Tull and Fairport and Steeleye Span, an Irish group finally opened up rock listeners like myself to traditional music, which for my young self had been poisoned by my parents' generation of showband crooners and unctuous Bing Crosby covers. With Horslips, I could drink from the well, so to speak, and my erstwhile (pre)punk cred might have been a bit tainted, but the energy and intelligence of this debut made its own claim for attention confidently yet sensitively.

Hearing this album decades after I first did, some of the arrangements have honestly not worn well, but the same can be said for all three English bands in the previous paragraph. What distinguishes Horslips from their peers may be that they the five Irishman could tap into a still living musical and linguistic tradition, and went to learn from musicians rather than, as Ashley Hutchings did, from the manuscripts--themselves collected by such as Lloyd and way back by Child, of course. Not to by any means denigrating the English example, but I'd hazard that the connection with the "living tradition" for Horslips, I sense, was somewhat closer than for the late 60s London bands that preceded them into folk & rock. Perhaps Sweeney's Men predated Horslips into merging some outside influences into an Irish trad foundation, but that late-60s trio sought inspiration more from Californian folk-rock and its L.A. singer-songwriters.

Also, Horslips thrived just as Planxty and then the Bothy Band were jump-starting the home-grown trad scene, playing the old tunes touched by veins of rock rather than as fossilized artifacts.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Groundbreaking album November 2, 2002
Format:Audio CD
This, their first album, is one of Horslips' best and most innovative. They create some very unique, interesting and immensely enjoyable music by blending traditional Irish music with hard/progressive/psychedelic rock. It is more folk orientated than most of their later efforts but it is also incredibly diverse with each song approaching the blending of trad and rock from different angles. A truly amazing groundbreaking album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This took Ireland by storm when it came out in '73 August 9, 2006
Format:Audio CD
Note: this is dated 2006 and not 2000, but should be the same Edsel-Demon reissue that the band approved and supervised. It's essential that you purchase only this version, not the 1990s Outlet one with inferior sound and cheap packaging.

When I first heard this, in the wonderful l.p. version that was die cut like a concertina, it made me proud. In the era of Tull and Fairport and Steeleye Span, an Irish group finally opened up rock listeners like myself to traditional music, which for my young self had been poisoned by my parents' generation of showband crooners and unctuous Bing Crosby covers. With Horslips, I could drink from the well, so to speak, and my erstwhile (pre)punk cred might have been a bit tainted, but the energy and intelligence of this debut made its own claim for attention confidently yet sensitively.

Hearing this album decades after I first did, some of the arrangements have honestly not worn well, but the same can be said for all three English bands in the previous paragraph. What distinguishes Horslips from their peers may be that they the five Irishman could tap into a still living musical and linguistic tradition, and went to learn from musicians rather than, as Ashley Hutchings did, from the manuscripts--themselves collected by such as Lloyd and way back by Child, of course. Not to by any means denigrating the English example, but I'd hazard that the connection with the "living tradition" for Horslips, I sense, was somewhat closer than for the late 60s London bands that preceded them into folk & rock. Perhaps Sweeney's Men predated Horslips into merging some outside influences into an Irish trad foundation, but that late-60s trio sought inspiration more from Californian folk-rock and its L.A. singer-songwriters.
Read more ›
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