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Hard Sayings of the Bible (Hard Sayings Series the Hard Sayings) Hardcover – November 6, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0830814237 ISBN-10: 083081423X Edition: Subsequent

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Product Details

  • Series: Hard Sayings Series the Hard Sayings
  • Hardcover: 811 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic; Subsequent edition (November 6, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 083081423X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830814237
  • Product Dimensions: 2.2 x 6.5 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #321,948 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kaiser is Colman M. Mockler Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Old Testament and president emeritus of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. For many years he served as professor of Old Testament and as dean and vice president for education at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (Deerfield, Illinois). A frequent speaker at churches, camps and conferences, he has written numerous books, including Toward an Exegetical Theology, Toward an Old Testament Theology, Toward Old Testament Ethics and The Messiah in the Old Testament.

Peter H. Davids is a professor of Christianity at Houston Baptist University and part-time professor at Houston Graduate School of Theology. He has taught biblical studies at Regent College (Vancouver, British Columbia) and Canadian Theological Seminary (Regina, Saskatchewan), and he continues to teach in theological schools in Europe. He is the author of commentaries on James and 1 Peter.

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote more than forty bestselling commentaries and books, including several titles published by InterVarsity Press, A Mind for What Matters and Paul, Apostle of the Heart Set Free. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Manfred T. Brauch (Ph.D., McMaster University) is retired professor of biblical theology and past president of Palmer Theological Seminary of Eastern University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is the author of Set Free to Be: A Study in Romans, and Hard Sayings of Paul, and a contributor to Hard Sayings of the Bible. Since 2004, Brauch and his wife have done long-term volunteer work in medical missions and theological education in Chile, Russia and Cameroon, West Africa. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Walter C. Kaiser Jr. (PhD, Brandeis University) is distinguished professor emeritus of Old Testament and president emeritus of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. Dr. Kaiser has written over 40 books, including Toward an Exegetical Theology: Biblical Exegesis for Preaching and Teaching; The Messiah in the Old Testament; and The Promise-Plan of God; and coauthored An Introduction to Biblical Hermeneutics: The Search for Meaning. Dr. Kaiser and his wife, Marge, currently reside at Kerith Farm in Cedar Grove, Wisconsin. Dr. Kaiser's website is www.walterckaiserjr.com.

Customer Reviews

This book answers most of my questions!
Souzan Abdelmassih
Excellent resource for pastors, Sunday school teachers, or any student of the Bible.
hoos
The work is pretty thick consisting of several hundred pages.
S.D. Parker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 52 people found the following review helpful By E. Johnson on July 28, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I don't think there is any mystery to the fact that some biblical passages are tougher to interpret than others. This is why I so appreciate this book. In fact, I had bought the individual IVP books that were later compiled into Hard Sayings of the Bible, and I spent the money for this because it's nice having it all in one bound volume. I have used this many times to see if a particular passage is talked about, and probably half of the time it's in there. (I consider this to be a pretty high percentage.) While I may not always agree with the assessment, it is nice to get other perspectives, and more than once they have convinced me of their position on very difficult passages.
So, for the person who honestly struggles with interpreting the scripture for himself, I would say this is a good book to have as a reference tool. The authors are certainly scholars who are worth, at the very least, a consideration.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Michael Taylor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In my humble opinion, the authors have produced an excellent guide for anyone who has honest intellectual questions about seeming contracdictions or hard-to-address issues in the Bible.
Before addressing the issues, the authors first establish the Bible as God's Word, how arcaheology supports the Bible, accuracy of Old Testament prophecies, and other biblically-based questions. Afterwards, the authors then address specific issues and seemingly contradictory statements in the Bible.
I particulary appreciated the book's format - the questions and issues are arranged in order according to the Bible's organization - starting with Genesis and ending with Revelation.
While some books are addressed in more detail than others, much information is included for the reader.
While you may not agree with all of authors' conclusions, you will certainly be challenged to think about particular issues in the Bible.
Read and enjoy! Highly recommended!
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By S.D. Parker on May 27, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book offers a great scholarly look at some of the sayings that seem difficult to us who live in the 21st century -- far removed from the cultural setting and lingo in which the Bible was written. The work is pretty thick consisting of several hundred pages. I like this though, because (usually) more thickness means more substance, and fortunately I do indeed find it to be the case here. The book is also good because it addresses considerations from opposing camps that the authors do not necessarily agree with. Thus there is a sense of objectivity.

Now, on a defensive note, I've seen the objection from at least one other certain person that the book, hence the length, is essentially one convoluted mess of rationalizations attempting to fight a losing battle. As the work has also been described as 'cumulative rationalizations' and a work of torturous logic. These kind of statements come exceptionally close to the logical fallacy that long and complex arguements or statements imply that said statements are 'patch-work' for a failing viewpoint, paradigm, or what have you. This is a non-sequitur, because it does not follow that a work of great breadth and sophistication is a result of torturous rationalizations. Afterall, no one would suggest encyclopedia writers/publishers are in denial about reality! Indeed, even skeptics produce heavy works, but don't look for these same skeptics to apply such logic there!

In the end, could it be that the great amount of work put into this book, other than to satisfy all the relevant data possible, is to respond to the likewise "exhausting" and even sometimes "torturous" criticism that the Bible so often receives?
Read more ›
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Overall, a well researched volume which maintains a high regard for scripture. I appreciated many of the insights offered, particularly the treatment of many of the difficult passages in the Old Testament. However, I do have a serious complaint. The book seems to trivialize a number of hard teachings in the Bible either by skirting around the issue, or by interpreting them in such a way as to remove any possible offense, thus making them easy for anyone to accept. For example, whether or not you believe in predestination, the serious reader will find it somewhat suspect that the book deals with the entire issue by demonstrating how one particular passage really does not address predestination at all, then refering back to the commentary on that passage every time the issue reemerges.
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Ethan E. Harris VINE VOICE on June 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The short answer: Helpful answers to the most commonly asked questions about difficult texts of Scripture. Only Brauch's section on Paul is occasionally unsatisfactory.
It may not be a tome of resolutions for those with the a priori commitment to the Bible being inaccurate, but it is helpful in presenting feasible answers to many misunderstood texts of Scripture.
Also helpful is the notion that the Bible is largely written to Hebrews and not to linear-reasoned Greco-Roman philosophers. It just doesn't fit many folks grids because it is not necessarily written to the atomistic thinker (i.e., it's not a text on science).
All in all, this text is an easy to use reference to commonly misunderstood texts of Scripture.
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