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Hard to Swallow: Hard-Core Pornography on Screen Paperback – May 29, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Wallflower Press (May 29, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231162138
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231162135
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,995,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

An excellent snapshot of porn studies as they are today and provides an insight into the range and quality of critical engagement with hardcore pornography in the industry, in the academy, and beyond.

(Laura Ellen Joyce New Review of Film and Television Studies 1900-01-00)

About the Author

Claire Hines is Senior Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at Southampton Solent University, UK. She is co-author of Fantasy (with Jacqueline Furby, 2011) and her research and publications focus on James Bond, men's magazines, and representations of gender and sexuality on screen. Darren Kerr is Senior Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at Southampton Solent University, UK. He is co-editor of Tainted Love: Screening Sexual Perversities (with Donna Peberdy, 2012) and his research and publications focus on adaptation, pornography, and short films.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Roger Leatherwood Brown on May 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is part of a recent wave of academic studies on porn, a collection of papers/articles by supposed learned scholars but the selection is not as pointed as one might like, or as near to the edge as it should be in 2012.

Most selections seem to be surveys rather than true insightful investigations into trends or positions that some pornographers take. Boyle's discussion of "authenticity" takes Max Hardcore as the case study, a rich but limited example, and a long article on the "Pirates" (2005) porn hit tries to make more of its timed release to Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean movies than is there (come on guys, it's really just a Digital Playground rip-off. Just because it was successful does not mean it's particularly ground-breaking).

I thought a couple of later articles, including fashion in porn (Gibson and Kirkham's "Fashionably Laid") opened up new areas, and Johnson's discussion of "Shortbus" as well as Smith's "Reel Intercourse" address the authenticity of visual depiction of sex on-screen that Boyle doesn't come near. The book ends with 2 pieces on both gay pornography and lesbian porn, seemingly more an attempt to invite everyone in the tent. The lesbian piece (by Beirne) interrogates the shift from a presumed male gaze and is most interesting if dense in its analysis of Williams and Mulvey's earlier discourse on how the camera 'genders' events.

The introduction addresses how the Internet has democratized and personalized porn consumption, a topic of how people access the material on their own, in private, on their own terms, that lies only on the outskirts of this collection.
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