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122 of 124 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the Coffee Drippers
This is my third coffee dripper, and by far the best. For years, I used a plastic Melita one with a flattened bottom, and a single small hole in the bottom, but the coffee it made was nothing special. I also didn't like the plastic flavor that it imparted. I also tend to avoid using plastic with hot beverages. Then I replaced it with another dripper with a flattened...
Published on March 10, 2012 by Cathy W

versus
67 of 74 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not the original Hario product
Does not come in the Hario box, no measuring cup, no little manual. This is a cheap inferior copy that looks the same from afar, but when you touch the dripper there are a lot of imperfections, it is not as delicate as the Hario one, there is no "Made in Japan" on the bottom and the "02" imprint on the side. I never thought that one has to be aware of...
Published 9 months ago by Christian Vetter


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122 of 124 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the Coffee Drippers, March 10, 2012
By 
Cathy W (A Twin Cities, MN, burbclave) - See all my reviews
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This is my third coffee dripper, and by far the best. For years, I used a plastic Melita one with a flattened bottom, and a single small hole in the bottom, but the coffee it made was nothing special. I also didn't like the plastic flavor that it imparted. I also tend to avoid using plastic with hot beverages. Then I replaced it with another dripper with a flattened bottom, with three small holes in the bottom, this time made of ceramic. No plastic flavor anymore, but also no improvement in quality. Then I got the Hario. I NEVER would have thought that the shape of the funnel/filter and the size of the hole in the bottom could make such a difference. It allows a faster extraction, and the ridges help prevent a vacuum from forming (which slows the speed of the water draining through). You DO need to use special filters that are designed for true cone (not cut off across the bottom). This shapes helps keeps the grounds in the right place for the water.

You do need to learn how to properly brew coffee to get good coffee out of it. There are lots of videos online, and at Intelligentsiacoffee.com. First off, start with whole beans, and grind them to the proper fineness/coarseness (this takes some trial and error until you get it right for your tastes). In general, the grind should be medium to medium-fine.

Edit: For those that prefer a slower extraction - you can always grind the beans more finely - that will slow the extraction, as finer grounds "clog" the filter. But, as always, any adjustment to temperature, speed, grind will result in a different flavor.

1.Rinse your filter to remove paper residues, and put the grounds into the filter/dripper.
2. Once the water is boiling remove it from heat and swirl/stir it to get the heat even.
3. Pour just enough to saturate the grounds, and wait 45-60 seconds to let it bloom (it lets the C02 escape)
4. Pour SLOWLY a circular motion near the edges (but not ON the filter) to wash the grounds down into the brew. Try to pour slowly enough to not have to stop until you've run out of water, but without overflowing. Otherwise, the grounds will wash up onto the filter and you'll have to wash them back down when you start pouring again.
5. Wait for the water to drain through. Some people prefer to stop the process when the flow changes from a stream to drippy, but ground fineness will also change this speed, so you'll have to experiment. I just let it all drain through myself.

I have been following this process with my other ceramic dripper, and it resulted in merely decent coffee. This same process with the Hario resulted in actually GOOD coffee.
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121 of 130 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent French Press Alternative, March 2, 2011
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The Hario V60 Manual Drip Cone

I've found that the Hario V60 is an excellent alternative to a French press.

First, the V60 has an elegant design, and a very sound construction. It is clearly well made. If you are interested in this type of product, it may be helpful to know that Hario sells a plastic version of this drip cone for about $9.00. So you should be asking yourself, why would I want to pay the extra money to upgrade to a ceramic model? For me, I don't like the idea of hot plastic being anywhere near my coffee (or food for that matter). The second benefit of the ceramic model is that it retains heat MUCH better than plastic. With the pour-over method of coffee brewing, you need to plan ahead and pre-heat your drip cone, carafe and coffee cup or you will end up with a luke-warm cup of coffee. The ceramic makes this much easier.

This product is not for everyone. If you prefer a Mr. Coffee that you can program to make your coffee for you, by all means skip the Hario. But, if you really care about the details of how your coffee is made, and you like being able to orchestrate the process yourself, the V60 is an excellent choice. I have a Bodum Brazil French press, which is equally well made. But I prefer the Hario. The French press extracts more caffeine from coffee than the manual drip method, it leaves sediment behind in the coffee, and studies have shown that French press style coffee may raise levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) in the blood. I don't take the cholesterol claims all that seriously, but I do find them interesting. Coffee people are very passionate about their preferred brew methods, and I appreciate the people in the French press camp. For me, the V60 is an excellent way to brew coffee in the exact amount I want to drink. And it's delicious! This drip cone, paired with proper technique (search youtube), will bring out the full array of flavors from your beans.

I'm very happy with it, and give it 5 stars.
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67 of 74 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not the original Hario product, April 10, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Does not come in the Hario box, no measuring cup, no little manual. This is a cheap inferior copy that looks the same from afar, but when you touch the dripper there are a lot of imperfections, it is not as delicate as the Hario one, there is no "Made in Japan" on the bottom and the "02" imprint on the side. I never thought that one has to be aware of fake products on Amazon, but apparently you do. Very disappointing indeed. After getting my dripper and having doubts about it's authenticity, I went to a coffee show where they sell Hario products. I bought the real dripper it right away. Only paid $3 more. The two products are worlds apart. I hope Amazon will remove this seller from their website.
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49 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Glass Coffee Pour Over Funnel Dripper, April 30, 2011
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Sometimes I'll wake up in the morning and the coffee in the auto pot has turned off after 2 hours and I'm really wanting a fresh cup of joe, so I'll whip out my glass dripper. Placed on top of my mug with a #2 cone paper filter in it, I pour some hot water on the filter first; it helps heat your mug initially and the purists say it facilitates the brewing process when wet first. Slowly "circle" your hot water pouring only "in" the coffee grounds, not up the paper filter sides. Also, by circling - you don't create a hole in the grounds going straight through the center of the bottom that clears a path. Take a couple minutes to pour. With the notched sides on the black plastic of the dripper I can see the level of the rising coffee without removing the dripper. Sure you can get a plastic dripper (got one too), but I love how glass is inert and doesn't transfer plastic odors. The inside swirls in the glass are supposed to help the downward liquid flow. It will fit on top of a mug up to 4 inches across. You don't get sludge in the bottom of your cup with this method like you do with the french press. Love this dripper.
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83 of 94 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality coffee maker, December 27, 2010
This is a well thought out product. I've had many drip coffee makers over 3 1/2 decades and this is the best. It has a very large hole in the bottom and substantial ridges on the sides so clogging is unlikely if if used properly (Melitta filters can clog as they restrict flow and coffee ground too fine can be a problem as well). It has a wide base so I use it on top of my 4 cup coffee carafe. Warm the dripper under the tap before using, then time the water flow for 3 to 5 minutes and use a fork to make sure all the grounds are wet when beginning. Pour in the middle, only washing down the coffee stuck to the walls periodically using as little water on the sides as possible. I like this dripper because I can use a standard coffee filter. The Chemex filters are very expensive. Whatever you do, consider ridding yourself of plastic coffee makers with teflon warming plates--these products are carcinogenic.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars not as advertised, May 15, 2014
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I do not recommend this product because it is not well described by the advertisement.
The delivered product is definitely not made by Hario; it's clearly a counterfeit.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fake Hario, April 4, 2014
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Product came in unlabeled cardboard box. Product itself has no 'Made in Japan' nor 'Hario 02' label in ceramic identifying it as genuine Hario product. Moreover inner grooves are ill-defined and poor quality.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fake!, March 27, 2014
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I have a original one from Japan and this is completely different.

Differences:

Made in Japan not printed in the ceramic dripper.

Came without original box and without good design stick.

Bottom hole.

internal splines poorly made.
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39 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High quality pour-over coffee maker, February 10, 2012
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Got this so I could make single servings of coffee at work without busting out the huge Chemex "vase". Shopped around on Amazon for a bit before deciding against the plastic version... why go through all the trouble if you're just going to pour your coffee through plastic? The ceramic version turned out to be very sturdy and doesn't impart any "off" flavors to my coffee. Also, much quicker than my single serve french press which is a PITA to wash everytime.

The vortex ribs cause water to run through the paper, down the ribs, and straight into your cup without steeping in the coffee grounds, so it's best to pour water in a little bit at a time, about 1/3 of the way up and repeat a few times. This makes for a much stronger brew. With my chemex, I don't have to be so careful because of the smooth glass and thicker paper which allows more time for the water to mingle with the grounds :)

11/15/2012 Edit: I've been using my Chemex filters in this and the flavor is definitely stronger since the thicker paper holds the water in for just a tad bit longer. Doesn't hurt that the Chemex filters are cheaper than the Hario ones! Skip the Hario filters ;)
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fun, if fussy, way to make coffee, July 24, 2012
This review is from: Hario VD-02T V60 02 Coffee Dripper, Clear (Kitchen)
If you are a serious coffee enthusiast this is a great option for making coffee at a relatively low price. Good for the cost conscious budding "coffee snob" or as an alternative to a truly good coffee machine such as a Technivorm (which cost $~300).

If like me you are a super serious enthusiast with a large collection of coffee equipment this makes a great addition.

What this is not, however, is a no-brainer coffee brewer.

There is a short but steep learning curve to achieving the potential of this product. There are hundreds of youtube videos which can instruct you on the various techniques, so you won't be without hints & tips. However you will want to probably buy a new water kettle as using this correctly requires very good water/pouring control; of course Hario sells an excellent one.

The key elements of the coffee product, once you've mastered the technique, are clarity (as it uses a paper filter) and excellent control of the extraction so you can play with the coffee in an effort to achieve what you believe to be the "ultimate" product from it.

This is not a quick & easy method. It takes several minutes of actual concentration and effort to produce just a few cups of coffee. By contrast espresso takes only one minute, a press pot takes several minutes but only 30 seconds of activity, a coffee machine obviously requires almost no effort. It is quicker than a vacuum/siphon pot but only marginally so.

It also requires very good coffee beans. With mediocre coffee it can magnify the negatives. Counter Culture, Intelligentsia, or even Peet's (fresh roasted, not from the super market) are all good options. However in my experience not all quality coffee beans are a good match for this method. Some of my favorite blends taste sort of crappy with this no matter what I try, whereas some single source coffee's practically sing with joy when made with the Hario.

This isn't by any means the "best" method of making coffee (there isn't a true "best"). It is, IMO, in the top four.
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Hario VD-02T V60 02 Coffee Dripper, Clear
$79.95 $7.91
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