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  • The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection Vols. 1-3
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The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection Vols. 1-3


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Product Details

  • Actors: Harold Lloyd, Adolphe Menjou, Verree Teasdale, Mildred Davis, Jobyna Ralston
  • Directors: Harold Lloyd, Alfred J. Goulding, Clyde Bruckman, Fred C. Newmeyer, Hal Roach
  • Format: Silent, NTSC, Original recording remastered, Restored, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 7
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: New Line Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: November 15, 2005
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000B5XORA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #167,623 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection Vols. 1-3" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Vol. 1 includes: Safety Last!, An Eastern Westerner, Ask Father, Girl Shy with alt. organ score, From Hand to Mouth, The Cat's-Paw, The Milky Way, Why Worry?
  • Commentary by critic Leonard Maltin & director Rich Correll on Safety Last!
  • Featurette: "Harold's Hollywood: Then and Now"
  • Production galleries
  • Vol. 2 includes: The Kid Brother, Bumping Into Broadway, The Freshman, Billy Blazes Esq. with alt. organ score, Dr. Jack, Feet First, Grandma's Boy, Now or Never, High and Dizzy
  • Commentary by Leonard Maltin, director Richard Correll, and film historian Richard W. Bann on The Freshman
  • Commentary by Harold Lloyd's granddaughter Suzanne Lloyd, author Annette D'Agostino Lloyd, and Richard Correll on The Kid Brother
  • Featurette: "Scoring for Comedy"
  • Vol. 3 includes: Speedy, Never Weaken, Haunted Spooks, Hot Water with alternate organ score, Movie Crazy, Get Out and Get Under, For Heaven's Sake, Number Please?, A Sailor-Made Man, Among Those Present, I Do
  • Commentary by Harold Lloyd's granddaughter, author Annette D'Agostino Lloyd, and director Richard Correll on Speedy and Haunted Spooks
  • Featurette: "Greenacres"

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Having appeared in more than 200 films and widely considered to be one of cinema's most respected comic geniuses, Harold Lloyd was one of Hollywood's first true movie stars. Now, entertainment enthusiasts of all ages can enjoy the work of the man who inspired generations of acting greats with The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection.

DVD Features:
Audio Commentary
Biographies
Comparison Scenes
Featurette
Interviews
Introduction
Other:*All feature films and shorts are full frame versions. **All content will have Spanish subtitles. Only the pictures with sound will have English subtitles and closed captions
Photo gallery:REMASTERED! RESTORED! RESCORED!

Amazon.com

The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection boxed set is the definitive account of one of the silent cinema's greatest comedians--and for a time, its most popular star. The seven discs included in this three-volume set have virtually all of Lloyd's 1920s features, most of his talking pictures, and a healthy collection of shorts. Because Lloyd--a canny businessman--retained control over much of his output, the films have remained under his (and his estate's) control through the decades, and the quality of the key titles is generally excellent.

Vol. 1 leads off with the most famous of Lloyd's pictures, the 1923 "thrill" comedy Safety Last. The bespectacled Mr. Lloyd found his spot in comedy by playing the persona seen here: an optimistic go-getter, energetic but not particularly remarkable, who perseveres as he moves up the ladder. In Safety Last, he really moves up: Harold is a department-store clerk who concocts a publicity scheme for his store, which results in a climactic, hair-raising ascent up the outside of the building (at one point hanging from the hands of a huge clock). There is at least one other masterpiece on Vol. 1, the wonderful Girl Shy (1924), in which Harold is a small-time tailor's apprentice who can't speak to women but nevertheless has penned a how-to book entitled "The Secret of Making Love." There's also the 1923 Why Worry?, which suffers just a bit with its odd milieu (tropical island beset by revolutionaries) but has some hilariously weird routines built around compact Harold and the giant John Aasen (8 feet, 9 inches). A trio of shorter films are included, plus two Paramount sound features, the oddball Cat's Paw and Leo McCarey's entertaining The Milky Way.

Vol. 2 has the brilliant The Freshman (1925), with Lloyd as a college plebe whose ridiculous ideas about making himself ingratiating to others (including hilariously inapt jig during a handshake) makes him the laughingstock of the campus. The movie concludes with a justifiably famous football sequence. The Kid Brother (1927) is Harold as the weak link in the tough Hickory family, while Dr. Jack (1922) casts him as a country doctor whose ordinary ways prove sharper than they seem (his co-star, as in some other films here, is future wife Mildred Davis). In Grandma's Boy (1922) Lloyd plays a small-town fellow who lives with his frisky grandmother; convinced of his own cowardice, he yearns to compete for the hand of a pretty girl. His courtly call to the girl's home is the occasion for uproarious battle with a ridiculous "formal" suit, mothballs, and a litter of kittens attracted by the goose grease on his shoes. The gem of the shorts here is High and Dizzy (1920), a warm-up for Safety Last, which has a great sequence with Lloyd tipsily navigating a ledge on a high building. Feet First (1930), Lloyd's second talking picture, has Harold as an upwardly-striving shoe salesman trying to finesse his way up the ladder. Some good shipboard sequences in the middle of this one, but the main drawing card is a throwback: Lloyd re-visiting the Safety Last hanging-from-a-building sequence, but this time working every variation known to slapstick.

Vol. 3 has Speedy, his last silent picture, which packs as many great gags per minute as any Lloyd film, and also has one of his sweetest love stories. But the film is also notable for its extensive location shooting in New York City. The sequences shot at Coney Island, with some wonderfully hair-raising (and understandably obsolete) rides, are gorgeous and historically valuable. Hot Water (1924) also goes into the time capsule of great Lloyd features, even if it feels like a handful of shorter films shoehorned together. This one gets its charm from basic domestic situations. Like Hot Water, For Heaven's Sake (1926) is an hour long; this funny one casts Lloyd as a rich twit who takes up with a girl whose father runs a homeless mission.

There's one talking picture, the somewhat routine Movie Crazy (1932), but the silent shorts, of which there are many here, are better. Check out Haunted Spooks from 1920, which has its share of good jokes but which is also fascinating for its place in Lloyd's career. He suffered an off-set accident midway through shooting, costing him the thumb and forefinger of his right hand; after a hiatus, he completed shooting with a prosthetic glove (which he used in films thereafter). A heartfelt 15-minute documentary on Lloyd's palatial L.A. estate, Greenacres, uses copious home-movie footage to show the marvelous place and give a hint of Lloyd's homey, likable personality (it's narrated by granddaughter Suzanne Lloyd). A bonus disc contains home movies, celebrity tributes, Lloyd's collection of 3-D photographs, and his honorary Oscar acceptance speech from 1953. --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews

Buy this DVD set, period.
Richard L. Smolecki
Among the dozens of movies and anthologies I have on DVD, THE HAROLD LLOYD COLLECTION is one of my personal favorites and bound to be one of my most played.
Stephen H. Wood
Things that are perfectly obvious, which nobody watching the movie could possibly miss, she feels the need to "spell out" or even anticipate.
Eudoxos

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

149 of 157 people found the following review helpful By Donald Rogers on August 28, 2005
Format: DVD
I am so looking forward to this release! I have seen only a few of Lloyd's features: Grandma's Boy, The Kid Brother, Speedy, The Freshman, Hot Water, Girl Shy and of course Safety Last! (I guess that's more than a few.) But the point is, most of these films have been hard to find; some have been unavailable for literally decades.

I think Lloyd as a silent comedian is second only to Keaton, and I say that as a Chaplin-lover. Buy this now!

-----

On November 15th New Line will release three two-disc collections with a MSRP of $29.95 each. All three collections will also be available in a boxed set, The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection, which will include a bonus disc that will not be available separately. The boxed set will retail for $89.85. The discs will include the following films:

Volume 1

=======

Disc 1:

Girl Shy (1924)

Safety Last! (1923) w/ commentary by Leonard Maltin and director Richard Correll

An Eastern Westerner (1920)

Ask Father (1919)

From Hand to Mouth (1919)

Disc 2:

The Milky Way (1936)

The Cat's Paw (1934)

Why Worry? (1923)

Featurette "Harold's Hollywood: Then and Now"

Volume 2

=======

Disc 1:

The Kid Brother (1927) w/ commentary by Harold Lloyd's granddaughter Suzanne Lloyd, author Annette D'Agostino Lloyd, and Rich Correll

The Freshman (1925) w /commentary by Leonard Maltin, Richard Correll and author/film historian Richard W. Bann

Bumping Into Broadway (1919)

Billy Blazes, Esq. (1919)

Disc 2:

Feet First (1930)

Grandma's Boy (1922)

Dr.
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50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Richardson TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 16, 2005
Format: DVD
I am not going to review the movies....but the DVD set...
its outstanding..so far every film I have watched is magnificent....in picture quality. I only wish the Keaton films had been preserved this well. The audio commentaries (which are always welcome on silent films...are also well done,informative and entertaining). The extras are extremely tasty (featurettes...the one on LA in the day and now...is very fun and informative)...and MOST OF ALL????

the set is put together with quality being job ONE!
the packaging is classy..not cheap like many multiple disc sets...
the artwork is fun and prolific (again not the same image used over and over that we often get)...the menus on the DVDs are interesting.....Heck..this set is just been done bloody well right...FIRST class..all the way...and..
like another reviewer so brilliantly noted..at 27 movies for $62 ..its about $2.50 per feature...ridiculous value...

I urge people to buy this..if you are a fan you will have found Nirvana...if you are curious...its not a huge commmitment..
but I feel that respectable sales numbers for a quality project like this will encourage studios to treat other gems from the past with this love and care.....instead of just releasing the latest hits in five configurations and belching out sitcom episodes.....

This would make a wonderful gift for any cinema lover, comedy lover...or person with taste...on your holiday list.

I am a huge Chaplin and Keaton fan....and am starting to become a LLoyd affecianado while watching these...he isn't really anything like the other two silent greats...and that's good isn't it? Anyway...
well done to newline .....this is the kind of package I usually see from WB...
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36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Stephen H. Wood on March 26, 2006
Format: DVD
Among the dozens of movies and anthologies I have on DVD, THE HAROLD LLOYD COLLECTION is one of my personal favorites and bound to be one of my most played. In the world of silent film comedy greats, Harold Lloyd was less sentimental than Charlie Chaplin and much warmer than Buster Keaton. With his glasses character, Harold was the personification of the henpecked, never-say-die, confident young man beset with constant problems in Jazz Age America. Lloyd's screen image remains immensely appealing, leading ladies Mildred Harris and Jobyna Ralston are exquisite, his building climbing sight gags have never been topped (he is the one dangling from a clock in a famous still from SAFETY LAST), and his movies hold up wonderfully.

New Line Cinema's THE HAROLD LLOYD COLLECTION retails for a steep $90 (Amazon.com has it for $72), but includes every single silent short and feature that Harold Lloyd made during the 1920's and into the early 1930's. And the prints are all crystal-clear Lloyd Estate vault prints with lovely new music scores by Robert Israel. Unlike Keaton and Chaplin, the Lloyd films were all owned by him and kept off of TV for decades. The downside of this is that my 1960's generation grew up watching and loving Buster and Charlie, but not Harold. But we have reached a stage in 2006 when all three artists have virtually all of their cinematic work on DVD in mint-condition prints, so film scholars and general audiences alike are finally getting to enjoy the work of Harold Lloyd as a true silent comedy genius.

THE HAROLD LLOYD COLLECTION comprises seven disks over four volumes. Volume One includes SAFETY LAST (1923), GIRL SHY (1924), the sound features THE CAT'S PAW (1934) and THE MILKY WAY (1936) in restored UCLA Film and TV Archives prints, WHY WORRY?
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Musical Accompainment
I haven't heard the collection yet, but I in silent film wish I could have it both ways: I like the original scores usually - sometimes I think they are better with organ, sometimes with piano - but I also like to hear new scores as well. Since the music can occupy relatively little of the DVD... Read More
Jan 2, 2007 by MercyB4Sacrifice |  See all 2 posts
need help finding the 3-D photos!
I can't find them either, even after using the internet feature - attaching the disc to my computer, etc. STILL no 3D photos. And I don't know how to contact new Line cinema.
Feb 24, 2010 by Coney |  See all 4 posts
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