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Harold Pinter Plays 1: The Birthday Party, The Room, The Dumb Waiter, A Slight Ache, The Hothouse, A Night Out, The Black and White, The Examination (Faber Contemporary Classics) (v. 1) Paperback – September 10, 1996

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About the Author

Harold Pinter was born in London in 1930. He lived with Antonia Fraser from 1975 and they married in 1980. In 1995 he won the David Cohen British Literature Prize, awarded for a lifetime's achievement in literature. In 1996 he was given the Laurence Olivier Award for a lifetime's achievement in theatre. In 2002 he was made a Companion of Honour for services to literature. In 2005 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature and, in the same year, the Wilfred Owen Award for Poetry and the Franz Kafka Award (Prague). In 2006 he was awarded the Europe Theatre Prize and, in 2007, the highest French honour, the Legion d'honneur. He died in December 2008.
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Product Details

  • Series: Faber Contemporary Classics
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber Plays (September 10, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780571178445
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571178445
  • ASIN: 0571178448
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,375,848 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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a real masterpiece, The Hothouse, I mean. It was written more than 50 years ago, and it didn't loose any reference with our life. A real metaphor of power and the power of beaurocracy. It remind me to Orwell 1984. May I remind here a nice application of Kindle? During a week end in London (May 2013)with my wife, we saw that Hothouse was on stage at Trafalgar Studio Theater. We love Pinter, but we didn't know this play. I ordered it on my Kindle; I got it in one minute; I had the time to read it in the next hour; than we were to the theater enjoing the performance without loosing any subtlety of the text. Great!

Carlo Erminero
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John F. Rooney VINE VOICE on August 9, 2009
Format: Paperback
In "A Slight Ache" (1958) Harold Pinter was still trying to get his sea legs, experimenting, trying things out, probing. In this effort he has only two speaking characters, Edward and Flora, and one mute character, The Matchseller. At breakfast the couple are having an Absurdist, inane conversation about prosaic matters such as the garden. It's often funny stuff. It turns out that a Matchseller has been standing for months outside in all kinds of nasty weather in the lane behind their house where there is no traffic. Edward has grown quite frightened of this person, and, of course, wants him gone.
Flora, somehow attracted to the stranger, invites him in. He's dirty, smelly, and his matches are a sodden mess, but somehow she's sexually attracted by him. Edward prattles on to the man at great length and manages to convey little except the futility and meaninglessness of his (Edward's) own existence. The more he talks, the more vapid, superficial, and inconsequential his life seems. To Pinter identity, individuality is a very fragile thing.
Does the Matchseller represent death, rebirth, fate, change, or basically nothingness. Pinter can be annoying, prickly, and also dull and boring. You may see echoes of Ionesco ("The Killer") and Beckett in this one.
Prior to this Pinter had written "The Room," "The Birthday Party" and "The Dumbwaiter." This play along with others has that underlying sense of menace, an impending disaster, but it is less interesting and even more claustrophobic than the others. Keep your eye out for the Absurdist swap, sometimes a weird switcheroo. If this were the only play on a theater bill, I would advise customers not to pay too much for their tickets and to expect periods of the boring doldrums.
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