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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Paperback – Large Print, September 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Series: Harry Potter
  • Paperback: 936 pages
  • Publisher: Large Print Pr (September 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594130035
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594130038
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6,054 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #290,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J.K. Rowling offers up equal parts danger and delight--and any number of dragons, house-elves, and death-defying challenges. Now 14, her orphan hero has only two more weeks with his Muggle relatives before returning to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Yet one night a vision harrowing enough to make his lightning-bolt-shaped scar burn has Harry on edge and contacting his godfather-in-hiding, Sirius Black. Happily, the prospect of attending the season's premier sporting event, the Quidditch World Cup, is enough to make Harry momentarily forget that Lord Voldemort and his sinister familiars--the Death Eaters--are out for murder.

Readers, we will cast a giant invisibility cloak over any more plot and reveal only that You-Know-Who is very much after Harry and that this year there will be no Quidditch matches between Gryffindor, Ravenclaw, Hufflepuff, and Slytherin. Instead, Hogwarts will vie with two other magicians' schools, the stylish Beauxbatons and the icy Durmstrang, in a Triwizard Tournament. Those chosen to compete will undergo three supreme tests. Could Harry be one of the lucky contenders?

But Quidditch buffs need not go into mourning: we get our share of this great game at the World Cup. Attempting to go incognito as Muggles, 100,000 witches and wizards converge on a "nice deserted moor." As ever, Rowling magicks up the details that make her world so vivid, and so comic. Several spectators' tents, for instance, are entirely unquotidian. One is a minipalace, complete with live peacocks; another has three floors and multiple turrets. And the sports paraphernalia on offer includes rosettes "squealing the names of the players" as well as "tiny models of Firebolts that really flew, and collectible figures of famous players, which strolled across the palm of your hand, preening themselves." Needless to say, the two teams are decidedly different, down to their mascots. Bulgaria is supported by the beautiful veela, who instantly enchant everyone--including Ireland's supporters--over to their side. Until, that is, thousands of tiny cheerleaders engage in some pyrotechnics of their own: "The leprechauns had risen into the air again, and this time, they formed a giant hand, which was making a very rude sign indeed at the veela across the field."

Long before her fourth installment appeared, Rowling warned that it would be darker, and it's true that every exhilaration is equaled by a moment that has us fearing for Harry's life, the book's emotions running as deep as its dangers. Along the way, though, she conjures up such new characters as Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody, a Dark Wizard catcher who may or may not be getting paranoid in his old age, and Rita Skeeter, who beetles around Hogwarts in search of stories. (This Daily Prophet scoop artist has a Quick-Quotes Quill that turns even the most innocent assertion into tabloid innuendo.) And at her bedazzling close, Rowling leaves several plot strands open, awaiting book 5. This fan is ready to wager that the author herself is part veela--her pen her wand, her commitment to her world complete. (Ages 9 and older) --Kerry Fried --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

In our Best Books citation, PW wrote, "The fourth Harry Potter adventure, centering on an inter-school competition, boasts details that are as ingenious and original as ever. A spectacular climax will leave readers breathless." Ages 8-12. (July)
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

J K (Joanne Kathleen) Rowling was born in the summer of 1965 at Yate General Hospital in England and grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, and where her course included one year in Paris. As a postgraduate she moved to London to work at Amnesty International, doing research into human rights abuses in Francophone Africa. She started writing the Harry Potter series during a Manchester to London King's Cross train journey, and during the next five years, outlined the plots for each book and began writing the first novel. Jo then moved to northern Portugal, where she taught English as a foreign language. She married in October 1992 and gave birth to her daughter Jessica in 1993. When her marriage ended, she returned to the UK to live in Edinburgh, where "Harry Potter & the Philosopher's Stone" was eventually completed and in 1996 she received an offer of publication. The following summer the world was introduced to Harry Potter."Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" was published by Bloomsbury Children's Books in June 1997 and was published as "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" in America by Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic in September 1998.The second title in the series, "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets", was published in July 1998 (June 2, 1999 in America) and was No. 1 in the adult hardback bestseller charts for a month after publication. "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" was published on 8th July 1999 (September 8, 1999 in America) to worldwide acclaim and massive press attention. The book spent four weeks at No.1 in the adult hardback bestseller charts, while "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" simultaneously topped the paperback charts. In the US the first three Harry Potter books occupied the top three spots on numerous adult bestseller lists.The fourth book in the series, "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" was published in Britain, the USA, Canada and Australia 8th July 2000 with a record first print run of 1 million copies for the UK and 3.8 million for the US. It quickly broke all records for the greatest number of books sold on the first weekend of publication. The fifth book in the series, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," was published in Britain, the USA, Canada and Australia on 21st June 2003. Published in paperback on 10th July 2004, it is the longest in the series - 766 pages - and broke the records set by "Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire" as the fastest selling book in history. The sixth book in the series, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince", was published in the UK, US and other English-speaking countries on 16th July 2005 and also achieved record sales.The seventh and final book in the series, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," was published in the UK, US and other English speaking countries on 21st July 2007. The book is the fastest selling book in the UK and USA and sales have contributed to breaking the 375 million copies mark worldwide.J K Rowling has also written two small volumes, which appear as the titles of Harry's school books within the novels. "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and "Quidditch Through The Ages" were published by Bloomsbury Children's Books and Scholastic in March 2001 in aid of Comic Relief. The Harry Potter books have sold 400 million copies worldwide. They are distributed in over 200 territories and are translated into 67 languages.

Customer Reviews

The end is very interesting and will make you want to read the next book right away.
"angel2663"
J.K. Rowling has a great imagination for all the different ways she has found to introduce new animals and characters to her wonderful books.
Marti Lozer
He is a wizard and attends Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry along with his best friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger.
"rtiggerh"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

131 of 141 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Many stories have striven to catch the minds of its readers, or its listeners for that matter. From the beginning of time people have made daring attempts at concocting amusing and diverting tales, but J.K. Rowling has spun a most convincing story. Since the introduction of Harry Potter to the public, thousands upon thousands, undoubtedly millions, of every race, age, and religion, have fallen under his spell. After reading the fourth, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Finished it in less than three days; I couldn't put it down!), I have to let it be know that Ms. Rowling does not disappoint. As every preceding Potter book starts off, the newest is no different: Harry is staying with his insufferable relatives, the Dursleys. And as always, he has found a new, more creative and exciting means of shortening his summer stay with his Aunt, Uncle, and cousin. Trouble invariably manages to find Harry, even at his seemingly secure refuge. Lord Volde-- oh, goodness, excuse me!-- he-who-must-not-be-named is at his strongest, and Harry is facing greater risk than ever before. This is Harry's fourth year at Hogwarts, and he is now fourteen years old. So along with life-threatening situations, almost losing a best friend, meeting new foes, dealing with old ones- namely Professor Snape and Draco Malfoy, and managing to get most of his homework done, Potter must also deal with the anguish and misery of being a teenager. Take it from me, I'm seventeen years old, and it's hard for me to believe that J.K. Rowling hasn't just experienced the cruelty of peers and at the same time, the exciting prospects that come with the whole "Being a Teen" package. Fearing that I might give too much away, I'll leave you with this tidbit: You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll learn how to pronounce Hermione, but most importantly, you'll want to read more, and become a better person because of it.
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175 of 195 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 19, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I had read the first 3 novels In the Harry Potter series and had found them extremely enjoyable page turners, Rowling creates a complete, magical world and her characters are always perfectly developed: You cheer when Harry stands up to Snape, You scowl inside when Malfoy turns up and you feel safe and secure when Dumbledore's around. But quite simply, the extrodinary and sensational "Harry Potter and the Goblet Of Fire" leaves the previous books In the dust. From the opening chapter you realise this Isn't going to be your average Harry Potter book, a character suspected of murder Is himself murdered at the hands of Lord Voldemort. I had always felt a Harry potter novel didn't get exciting until the story reached Hogwarts, this time Harry, Ron and Hermione travel to see a Qudditch World Cup which doesen't leave you dosing off waiting for the Hogwarts Express. But from then on the pace becomes consistently quicker, Harry's name Is put In a "Goblet Of Fire" which chooses contestants for a tournament involving other schools of witchcraft and wizardry. Harry is helped throughout the tournament by a new teacher "Mad Eye Moody" someone who you begin to trust throughout the story. Harry makes his way through the tournament tasks and unexpectactly finds himself face to face with Lord Voldemort, resulting In the death of not a prominant, but significant character. By the end things have got so messy you can only cringe at the things which are no doubt to come. This Is by far the most compelling instalment In the series.Read more ›
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85 of 93 people found the following review helpful By Tim Henderson on July 10, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I found "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" to be just as exciting and entertaining as the previous books, if not more so. Rowlings is a great storyteller, and all her familiar trademarks are here: the colorful and eccentric characters, the humor, the playful use of words, the masterful cultivation of suspense. The book is over seven hundred pages long, but at the end you'll be wishing it were longer. There isn't a slow spot in it.
The story is, however, different in some ways from the previous ones. It's a lot darker and scarier, for one thing. Voldemort and his supporters play a prominent role in it, and their malice forms a palpable undercurrent in the plot from chapter one on. By the end of the story, you get to see just HOW evil Voldemort and his minions actually are. And let me tell you, they're pretty evil.
The other big difference is that Harry, Ron, Hermione and their friends are starting to grow up. The boys and girls have begun to notice each other now, and all the familiar problems of adolescence--jealousy, insecurity, fear of rejection, desire to fit in--or stand out--are starting to descend on them. I enjoy seeing the characters evolve in this way, but those who would rather they stay eternal 11-year-olds may be disappointed.
The story is not as self-contained as those in the previous books. Many plot lines are left open at the end, presumably to be resolved in books #5, 6, and 7. If you think you had a hard time waiting for "Goblet of Fire" to come out, wait till you finish it and are left thinking about the next one!
All in all, I highly recommend this book. If you're already a Harry Potter fan you won't be disappointed, and if you're not, reading it might very well make you one.
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