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339 of 357 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get your Harry fix and support a great cause!
Although the wait for 2002 and "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" is going to be a hard one for a lot of people, these two brief but fun books should fill the gap admirably as well as supporting a great cause. Released for the first time (well, to the general Muggle public), here's two of Harry Potter's schoolbooks, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to...
Published on November 24, 2001 by John DiBello

versus
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Short...But Sweet
I think this book is a fun read for any Harry Potter fan, although I felt a touch disapointed about the fact that they were so short (about 70 pages per book)... Also, I feel that Ms. Rowling could have included more magical creatures, such as bogarts, vampires, ghouls, poltergiests, dementors, ogres, house-elves (Hermoine would be very mad :-) and giants... The scribbles...
Published on April 21, 2001 by glamgirl69


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339 of 357 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get your Harry fix and support a great cause!, November 24, 2001
By 
This review is from: Harry Potter Schoolbooks: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them / Quidditch Through the Ages (Hardcover)
Although the wait for 2002 and "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" is going to be a hard one for a lot of people, these two brief but fun books should fill the gap admirably as well as supporting a great cause. Released for the first time (well, to the general Muggle public), here's two of Harry Potter's schoolbooks, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and "Quidditch Through the Ages."
Slim and quick reads, these books nevertheless are a great deal of fun. "Quidditch" provides us with a brief evolution and history of everyone's favorite broomstick-riding sport, with rules of play, focuses on top world teams, and the revelation that Americans don't really play Quidditch on the world-class level, preferring an American variation called "Quodpot." "Fantastic Beasts" is a brisk and humorous guide to mythical, er, totally real monsters and magical creatures from the Acromantula (giant spider) to the Yeti. This book is Harry Potter's own personal copy, and is enlivened with Harry and Ron's writing and jokes in the margins of the book. Both books feature a wonderfully dry-humored introduction by Albus Dumbledore. Both books are written with a friendly and light sense of humor that's delightful to read and makes great background for the serious Harry Potter fan. Quidditch team Chudley Cannons' motto is said to have been changed from "We shall conquer" to "Let's all just keep our fingers crossed and hope for the best."
The most important reason to buy these books, however, is to support Comic Relief UK, the British relief organization set up to help children in the disadvantaged countries of the world. Although we can't save the world from manticores or score the winning goal in a Quidditch World Cup match, we can still be heroes by supporting this great cause.
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191 of 199 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clever, funny, and completely integrated with the novels, March 13, 2001
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
J.K. Rowling has given us facsimile editions of two of Harry Potter's schoolbooks, all proceeds going to children's charities around the world. The books are only 64 pages each, but the print is very small and they are crammed with remarkably interesting information that fills out the background of Harry Potter's world. Headmaster Albus Dumbledore himself provides introductions to these special editions.
"Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them", by "Newt Scamander", describes all the magical creatures we have seen in the first four books of the series, plus many more. Harry's marginal notes (along with Ron Weasley's, since Ron's own copy apparently fell apart) remind us of many of his adventures. "Quidditch Through the Ages", by "Kennilworthy Whisp" shows how this magical sport (along with similar ones) has evolved, and also provides a history of magic broom technology with a good deal of supplementary material shedding light on wizard-Muggle relations throughout history.
Both books provide many hints towards a better understanding of what's really going on in the "backstory" in the Harry Potter books. They may not suffice to keep Potter fans totally satisfied until the next book comes out, but they'll surely create a big demand for other "supplementary" materials.
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79 of 82 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A part of Harry Potter we didn't know., March 23, 2001
By 
Callie "chroi" (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
No Harry Potter fan can be without these little books. Both of the books are modeled after the textbooks mentioned in the series and are written by the great authors Kennilworthy Whisp and Next Salamander(but with the help of JK Rowling). They also have a foreward by Dumbledore, in which Dumbledore explains that the purpose of releasing the books for muggles is to raise money for charity. Any muggle will have fun reading all of the many sections of these books about Quidditch and magical beasts. The Fantastic Beasts book, which I have read the most, is is a very good branch of Rowling's imagination. It talks about many different creatures, both dangerous and peaceful. Harry and Ron have written many notes in the book, some relating to the Chudley Cannons, some about Hagrid's love of monsters, and many about what they learned from facing monsters(they can confirm that there are giant spiders in Scotland). The other book is taken from the Hogwarts library, and we can tell that all of the Quidditch players have used this book often. It describes the history of Quidditch, the rules, the ancient forms of Quidditch, and the popularity of the game. It's pretty amazing what one can learn from these books. We learn that dodos aren't really extinct, but are magical birds that disappear from muggle sight. We learn that fairies lay eggs and grow in cocoons. We learn that America, Quodpot is more popular than Quidditch. We also learn the ten most common fouls of the seven hundred fouls that exist. We can even learn how many dollars Galleons are equivilent to. These books help us learn a part of the Harry Potter books we didn't know. Anyone impatient for the next book in the series will find relief here. I can assure you will love laughing at the cute humor. I hope for more text books in the future!
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get your Harry fix and support a great cause!, March 13, 2001
By 
Although the wait for 2002 and "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" is going to be a hard one for a lot of people, these two brief but fun books should fill the gap admirably as well as supporting a great cause. Released for the first time (well, to the general Muggle public), here's two of Harry Potter's schoolbooks, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and "Quidditch Through the Ages."
Slim and quick reads, these books nevertheless are a great deal of fun. "Quidditch" provides us with a brief evolution and history of everyone's favorite broomstick-riding sport, with rules of play, focuses on top world teams, and the revelation that Americans don't really play Quidditch on the world-class level, preferring an American variation called "Quodpot." "Fantastic Beasts" is a brisk and humorous guide to mythical, er, totally real monsters and magical creatures from the Acromantula (giant spider) to the Yeti. This book is Harry Potter's own personal copy, and is enlivened with Harry and Ron's writing and jokes in the margins of the book. Both books feature a wonderfully dry-humored introduction by Albus Dumbledore. Both books are written with a friendly and light sense of humor that's delightful to read and makes great background for the serious Harry Potter fan. Quidditch team Chudley Cannons' motto is said to have been changed from "We shall conquer" to "Let's all just keep our fingers crossed and hope for the best."
The most important reason to buy these books, however, is to support Comic Relief UK, the British relief organization set up to help children in the disadvantaged countries of the world. Although we can't save the world from manticores or score the winning goal in a Quidditch World Cup match, we can still be heroes by supporting this great cause.
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43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars J K Rowlings new Comic relief boooks, March 13, 2001
A Kid's Review
Wow! These books are just fantastic! An absoloute must for any Harry Potter fan. The books, 'Quidditch through the ages', explains everyhting you need to know about the wizards magical sport, including rules, teams and history.The book is funny too, with J K Rowlings humour lightening this amazingly imaganitive book. The next book, ' Fantastic Beasts and where to find them', includes many species mentioned in the books, and more that might well be included in the later books.Again, the book is very funny, and the notes scribbled by Harry, Ron and Hermione throughout the book are brilliant touches. For example, 'Chuddley Cannons', Rons favourite Quidditch team, is written on the odd page, and hangman and naughts and crosses games are scribbled at the beginning. As with 'Quidditch through the ages',there is an introduction written by none other than Albus Dumbledore, the Hogwarts headmaster, explaining to all non-muggles the aims of Comic relief. Buy these books, they are great fun as companions to the books, and of course, its for charity! So what are you waiting for? Go! Buy them, now!
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Supplementary Harry Potter knowledge for a good cause, December 25, 2003
This review is from: Harry Potter Schoolbooks: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them / Quidditch Through the Ages (Hardcover)
In order to benefit starving children around the world, J.K. Rowling put out this two book set in a nice purple cardboard slipcase based on Hogwarts textbooks, twenty percent of the retail sales minus taxes going to that charity. They are meant to be as supplementary back stories to the Harry Potter mythos, and as it is sponsored by Comic Relief, there is some funny material in both books. Both books have material that correspond to the first four books.
The first is Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them by Newt Scamander, which is one of the books all first year students needed. It's basically a small encyclopedia on those beasts, with M.O.M. (Ministry of Magic) classifications going from X (boring) to XXXXX (known wizard killer/impossible to train or domesticate), or, as a scribble next to it reads, "or anything Hagrid likes." And what is a beast defined as? The scribble in there reads "big hairy thing with too many legs."
The scribbles in the book are what also enhance this book. The book has a label "property of Harry Potter" on it, but we discover that Ron Weasley has been borrowing his book because he's spending his money on dung bombs instead of a new book. For example, on the entry on Acromantula, giant eight-eyed spiders, there is a XXXXX rating, but several more X's have been scribbled, presumably by Mr. Weasley (q.v. Chamber of Secrets). There's a funny comment under Pixies (q.v. Chamber of Secrets).
The entry in the Chimaera mentions a wizard who fell off his winged horse and died after slaying one. This is clearly a reference to Greek mythology's Bellorophon, who fell off Pegasus after being stung by a wasp.
The second is Quidditch Through The Ages by Kennilworthy Whisp, with a seal reading "Property of Hogwarts Library" which reads like a history book and goes first from the development of the broomstick as a form of transport to its use in sports. This takes the reader to brief descriptions of early broomstick games, and then to a certain game played at Queerditch Marsh in the 11th century. The evolution of the game is detailed, but the most fascinating part is the origins of the Golden Snitch, which itself has a sad but ultimately humane ending. However, I consider it a good move to have the blooders made of stone to Bludgers made out of iron. Both would still be very painful if one was smacked in the gourd by one.
Other bits include major Quidditch teams, slang terms, broomstick models, and Quidditch moves (such as the Wronski feint, which Harry does in the first movie in order to reach the Snitch).
However, the book has duplicated wear and tear, plus a list of pupils who've checked this book out, include Oliver Wood, Angelina Johnson, Millicent Bulstrode, and the last two names, who are more than well known--a certain Hermione Granger and Harry Potter. Those who are into HP will recognize the names I've listed.
While made for the main target market for Harry Potter, adults who read the book will get a laugh out of the scribbles in the red Beasts book and an insight into the creative historical-minded side of J.K. Rowling, oops, I mean Kennilworthy Whisp. The books demonstrate an advanced knowledge in mythology, medieval history, and sports (love those Quidditch team names). Oh, and yes, as Ron Weasley says, dungbombs rule, especially if they're thrown at Draco Malfoy or Professor Snape, yes?
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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Part of Harry... That I'm Sure You Want to Know!, July 6, 2001
Since I started reading the Harry Potter book series I have always wanted to see what his schoolbooks were like. Now, I was able to read them. They are excellent, and I just don't know how J.K. Rowling gets all of these ideas for the different beasts, and the different types of balls used for Quidditch. She is truly a remarkable writer.
Both of the books are modeled after the textbooks mentioned in the series and are written by the great authors Kennilworthy Whisp and Next Salamander(with the help of J.K Rowling). They also have a foreward by Dumbledore, in which Dumbledore explains that the purpose of releasing the books for muggles is to raise money for charity. Any muggle will have fun reading all of the many sections of these books about Quidditch and magical beasts. The Fantastic Beasts and Where to find Them, which I have read the most, is is a very good branch of Rowling's imagination. It talks about many different creatures, both dangerous and peaceful. Harry and Ron have written many notes in the book, some relating to the Chudley Cannons, some about Hagrid's love of monsters, and many about what they learned from facing monsters(they can confirm that there are giant spiders in Scotland). The other book is taken from the Hogwarts library, and we can tell that all of the Quidditch players have used this book often. It describes the history of Quidditch, the rules, the ancient forms of Quidditch, and the popularity of the game. It's pretty amazing what one can learn from these books. We learn that dodos aren't really extinct, but are magical birds that disappear from muggle sight. We learn that fairies lay eggs and grow in cocoons. We learn that America, Quodpot is more popular than Quidditch. We also learn the ten most common fouls of the seven hundred fouls that exist. We can even learn how many dollars Galleons are equivilent to. These books help us learn a part of the Harry Potter books we didn't know. Anyone impatient for the next book in the series will find relief here. I can assure you will love laughing at the cute humor. I hope for more text books in the future!
Thanks J.K and Thank You for Taking Time to Read My Review,
Jordan
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A little something to tide us over, December 4, 2001
By 
"khruntpig" (Brighton, MA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Harry Potter Schoolbooks: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them / Quidditch Through the Ages (Hardcover)
These books may not be Harry Potter #5, but they'll help keep fans of the series busy until the next book is published. Although they don't have the characters or plot of the novels in the Harry Potter series, these little books are full of the details of the magical world that help make all of J.K. Rowling's books so much fun.
Creatures that get only a passing mention in the novels are more fully explained and new creatures are introduced in "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," and the history and current state of the magical game of Quidditch is fully presented in "Quidditch Through the Ages."
On of my favorite things about the books is that they include only information available in the magical world at the time in the Harry Potter series that Harry acquires them, so that the Firebolt broom is not mentioned in "Quidditch" and the information in "Fantastic Beasts" is slightly out of date for those who have read all four books published so far. This is just another example (to my mind) of how richly and precisely detailed Rowling's conception of the magical world is.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Titanic Texts, March 13, 2001
By 
E. M. Holmes (California, United States) - See all my reviews
Leave it to J.K. Rowling to make school textbooks interesting. To appease the millions (and millions . . . and millions) of fans of the Harry Potter saga (who won't be getting a new novel until sometime after the next millenium . . . at least it feels that way), Rowling has written two brief books used by the Hogwarts students. One is a library book; the other is owned by Harry (but used by Ron as well). Clever and informative, both books contain references to all four books in the saga while whetting our appetite with new information from the world of Harry Potter. I especially liked "Quidditch Through the Ages" which had facts about the history of the wizard sport and many of the teams throughout the world. And wouldn't you know it? America isn't preoccupied with Quidditch like the rest of the world. We have our own wizarding sport--Quodpot, a basketball-type game with exploding balls. I guess we haven't taken to soccer like the rest of the world either, so we needed our own wizarding sport as well. "Fantastic Beasts," on the other hand, contains wonderfully hilarious notes by Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the margins of the text that had me flipping through the pages just to read them. The books are good and well written, but they are definitely for the Harry Potter initiated. Anyone diving into these without any knowledge of Bertie Botts or Hagrid or hippogriffs will find them about as comprehensible as a Quantum Physics book. For those in the know, enjoy! I did.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you cannot go to Hogwarts, let Hogwarts come to you, July 5, 2003
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This review is from: Harry Potter Schoolbooks: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them / Quidditch Through the Ages (Hardcover)
Although not a necessary addition to everyone's personal Harry Potter library, these two little books are quite interesting and a lot of fun to read. They are both quite short, totaling less than sixty five pages apiece, but they are wonderfully put together and made to look like copies of real books from the Hogwarts library. None other than Albus Dumbledore himself writes the introduction to each book, explaining how and why these books are being made available to Muggles for the first time and explaining how proceeds from each book go directly to a fund, set up in Harry Potter's name by Comic Relief UK and author J.K. Rowling, which is dedicated to help children in need throughout the world.
Quidditch Through the Ages, penned by Quidditch expert Kennilworthy Whisp explains the ultimate sport of wizards from top to bottom, giving the centuries-old history of the game as it has evolved. First and foremost, he explains why wizards and witches employ brooms to fly on in the first place, and then he proceeds to give an account of the changing rules of the game from its early days of primitive baskets set atop poles to the standardized and world-sweeping format of today. Of most significance and interest is the story of how the Golden Snitch was introduced into the sport. Different strategies and maneuvers are named and explained, the thirteen Quidditch teams of England and Ireland are identified, some of the seven hundred types of fouls are explained, and some of the most memorable games and individual performances are detailed (including the Tutshill Tornados' Roderick Plumpton's amazing snag of the Golden Snitch only three and a half seconds into a game back in 1921).
Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them by Newt Scamander is a compendium of all the fantastic beasts currently known, from the Acromantula to the Yeti. Prior to the actual listings, Scamander explains the criteria by which some beings have come to be labeled beasts (it's more complicated than you might think) and devotes some time to the obvious question as to why Muggles seem to spot such creatures only rarely. Each listing also carries the classification assigned each beast by the Ministry of Magic, which is important information given that these beasts range from the harmless to the controllable to the incredibly dangerous. Along with fascinating descriptions of the animals we have already encountered in the Harry Potter books, there are some real jewels of information included here, solving several Muggle mysteries such as that of the true identity of the Loch Ness Monster. Fantastic Beasts is a copy of Harry Potter's own personal copy of the book, and its margins are dotted with little notes ranging from the mundane to the bitingly funny written by Harry, Ron, as well as Hermione. Now, if we could only get our hands on A History of Hogwarts; I'm sure Hermione has a copy they can use for the printing of a Muggle edition.
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Harry Potter Schoolbooks: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them / Quidditch Through the Ages
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