Buy Used
$3.50
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used - Good. Ships fast! Some wear to cover and corners, writing in book.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Harsh Truth About Public Schools Paperback – November 1, 2004


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.89 $3.50
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Chalcedon/Ross House Books; 1ST edition (November 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1891375237
  • ISBN-13: 978-1891375231
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #134,249 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It is very well researched and easy to read.
Veritas
For this goal, real education was unnecessary and even counter to the overall intention of public schools.
Alexander E. Paulsen
If you have children, this could be one of the most important books you will ever read.
J McMurdo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

145 of 153 people found the following review helpful By Marshall Fritz on January 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
I've known Bruce Shortt for several years. His critics,
and there will be many in the education establishment
when they catch wind of his book, will find the truth
about Bruce hard to take: He is an excellent home schooling
father; from what I can tell, an excellent husband; and
he is certainly an honest researcher into the state of
school-by-government in America today.

Unlike many who carp about "public schools," Bruce does
not believe that if he and his pals could just get in
charge that everything would be OK. He recognizes that
the whole idea of having the government run schools makes
as much sense as having government run factories, farms,
insurance companies, etc.

His critique is not aimed at the PEOPLE in the system.

His critique is about the system itself---that "public
schools" from the beginning were intended to reduce the
role of the family and increase the role of government.

His purpose is not to advise on how to "fix the system."

His advice is to parents: Get your children out of the
system! Home school them if you can. If that's not possible,
find a private school where the textbooks, teachers, and
other parents will be reinforcing what you and your spouse
are teaching your children.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
103 of 110 people found the following review helpful By Alexander E. Paulsen on February 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
Shortt lauches a broadside at the government school system. Some may recall that Mr Shortt was one of the sponsors of a push to get Christians to pull their children en-masse from the public schools. Although the resoltuin never passed Shortt was added to the long list of enemies of the DOE and NEA.

Shortt fires his broadside with a number of weapons, some from the Christian perspective, but most should be of issue to nay parent concerned about the childrens future.

While you can go about whether schools should exclude religion from the curriculum or not - this argument has proponets on both the Christian and secular sides, Shortt's most powerful criticisms have nothing to do with religion.

In my view the points made by the author are very strong indeed and boil down to basically the schools are "dumbing down" the curriculum, children are bored silly and many have to be drugged ( Ritalin, etc ) in order to put up with the hours of stupifying boredom in the dumbed down classes.

Shortt makes a good case. He argues also that reform efforts are futile since the system is structed in a way that will resist any attempts to reform any thing other than cosmetic features.

There are many fine works on the history of public education, and we don't need to go into them extensively here, but Shortt points out that the current system was modeled after the old Prussian system, Prussian schools considered children to be the property of the state. The state treated them that way. They were taught to be obedient to the state and their main purpose is to advance the interests of the state.

For this goal, real education was unnecessary and even counter to the overall intention of public schools.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
66 of 70 people found the following review helpful By qrnow on May 20, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all I am not a Christian so I don't have an axe to grind with regards to that point of view. I do have an M.Ed. and 4 children 3 of whom have graduated from college and another in his second year majoring in Chemical Engineering and doing quite well. That said after reading Shortt's book here are my brief perceptions since some excellent reviews have already been written.

The book is very well researched and annotated with an extensive bibliography. The Christian theme is not overbearing and does not detract from the information presented. The points that Shortt makes are cogent and significant and validated by ample research and anecdotal examples.

The fact that Shortt is not a teacher should not impact on one's decision to read the book. Teachers have been indoctrinated by the same educational system that they are now a part of and very naturally participate in supporting a $500 Billion system which provides them with their livlihood. How objective can we expect them to be? That's like asking a fish swimming in polluted water to evaluate the quality of the water he is living in. (Assuming, of course, that we are dealing with an educated fish who can converse intelligently with us as well.)

The fact is, teachers have a lot at stake and are not apt to rock the boat and make any kind of appreciable difference in the system that they help to support. And even if they did, controls from the top would probably suppress it in some way that maintained an even keel in the status quo and made sure that no meaningful or lasting change in direction would actually take place.

Rather than rehash other reviews let me just say this.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By R. A. Hanson on January 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
When you begin reading The Harsh Truth About Public Schools four words will come to your mind: "Thank you Bruce Shortt!" The reason for this is that this courageous Texas attorney unmasks the deceptive veil of public schools and provides explicitly clear biblical reasons to end your association with them n-o-w!

There are eight chapters and nearly one thousand endnotes of information to share with your friends who have not yet decided to exit the government schools. In addition to "outing" the curriculum (and the unbiblical reasons behind it) Shortt takes apart the ten most common objections people voice about exiting their children, such as:

o Our school is different

o My child is "salt and light"

o Our school has some Christian teachers

o What about my child's social skills?

o I went to public schools and turned out fine

Perhaps no objection more epitomizes the reason to exit public schools than the one that states: "I turned out fine." Implicit in this rationalization is the idea that "there is nothing wrong with my worldview, since I think about today's issues the same as other Christians." Yet, research shows that less than one in ten adults has a Christian worldview. This means that if your view of the world and current events mirrors the views of "most everyone else," your worldview is in serious need of help

Shortt also includes valuable information to assist you make the decision on whether to home school or use Christian day schools.

If you haven't made the decision to exit your children (and maybe even yourself) from public schools, get a copy of The Harsh Truth About Public Schools today.

May we all say, "Thank you Bruce Shortt!" for providing this most excellent and timely resource.

Buddy Hanson, President, Christian Policy Network

bhanson@graceandlaw.com
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?