Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Harvesting H2o: A prepper's guide to the collection, treatment, and storage of drinking water while living off the grid.
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on July 24, 2013
I agree with this review:

This is a decent overview of water husbandry. Everything you need to know is not here. If you want a place to start, this is a good overview. Several different methods of obtaining clean water are described and give you a good foundation for further research.

It gave me some new ideas on water drilling methods and water purification/collection. This is not a book to start using after the power grid gets shut down for who knows how long. Once you get your own place(hopefully it already has some sort of water source) I would build a wide shallow well for bucket collection if need be and maybe even use the one method of driving the pipe in the ground with a sledge hammer for another back up. If you have a deep water well or are having one installed, look up the well pump that is used all across Africa. It hooks up to just about any power source and doesn't burn out. Once you get it then hook it up to solar. Rainwater collection is a no brainer. Buy some of those big 12-1500 gallon tanks from TS or Atwoods. With all these methods, you will be prepared. Start with the cheapest most practical method for your situation...deep water wells are thousands and so is that pump.
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on December 16, 2012
Nicholas Hyde's Harvesting H20: A Prepper's Guide to the Collection, Treatment, and Storage of Drinking Water While Living Off the Grid is informative and thorough. It is fluid, articulate and thus easy to follow along. It does a good job in explaining the depleting water resource and the need for creativity in making due with the current resource.

Quite frankly, I didn't know that we could filter ocean water so as to make it potable. I especially appreciate the information regarding the portable marine water maker. I am fascinated by the fact that only 10% of filtered ocean water is drinkable. While I don't know very much about ocean water purification theories, I find it hard to believe that portable marine water makers could possibly lead to the decay of the ocean's ecosystem. Read it for yourself! It's a great read especially if you are inclined in the physical sciences.

For those of us who are more inclined in the Humanities, it gets a little tricky at time to navigate the book but it's well worth it nonetheless!
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on December 13, 2012
I really, really enjoyed this book. I often think that years ago no one ran around with all this bottled water. People drank from a water fountain when they were thirsty.

I really liked all the different options discussed on various sources of water and how to contain/store the water and also on how to purify it for drinking or if you only need the water for irrigation.

The book explains basically how to survive off the grid with regard to water. Where to get water, how to filter it for drinking, methods to get water and where/how to store the water. The book covers practically everything so that if you were in a situation where you needed to survive and purify your own water, you could with natural elements.

Truly a great read especially if you are like me - reduce, reuse and recycle!
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on June 24, 2013
This was a very informative book. As I currently live in the countryside and potable water is difficult at times to come by, this was a great book to buy and keep as a reference tool. Most of the info. was not new to me, but the ideas to D.I.Y. were. I would recommend this book to anyone looking to have an abundant source of quality water for their home.
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on August 25, 2014
As many Loldogs and cats say, DO NOT WANT.

Honestly, you're far better off going to some of the prepper/homesteader sites and reading and following the links -- not to mention that the community will generally answer any questions you might have about your specific situation.

Upfront -- In fairness, I haven't read all of the book. After looking at the table of contents and reading a few pages from the chapters for which I bought the book, I knew this was not at all the publication I was looking for and was destined for the compost pile. What happened here is the "danger" of buying unknown books sight unseen; had I looked at it and leafed through it, I'd never have bought it.This is the very first time Amazon reviewers have let me down, and I've been shopping here since the mid-90s.

This is NOT a preppers guide in any sense of the term. The book is simplistic, over-generalized, and something I could have written (I am published by several major publishing houses in both fiction and non-fiction) without having to do a lick of research, just based on my own very limited knowledge of harvesting and storing systems -- though I'd never produce something this, well, awful.

I bought this because it was advertised as being able to take my prepper knowledge of water harvesting and storage to the next level. Forget the next level completely. Parts of it might serve as an introduction to the topic for ten-year olds.

Examples? (Again, limited because of not reading the entire waste of time it'd be for me.) He wants you to stockpile faucet water purification units to filter your water. Uh...no, that really doesn't work in a WTSHTF situation. Again, didn't read the entire chapter, but he seems to rely heavily on commercially manufactured bits and bobs that won't work for preppers or homesteaders without a lot of disposable income and storage space. That's not most of us. Mr. Hyde has apparently not yet learned to write to his audience.

For homesteaders or those preppers who are working on a safe harbor, he dismisses rain collection off your roof or in open barrels entirely because of debris and storage issues -- except for some *possible* irrigation use, though he appears to have his doubts about *that* as well. Ridiculous! It's so easy to modify your gutter system to keep out debris, etc. and if you've taken the time and effort to set up your water collection system correctly, storage isn't an issue because you're using the water long before it goes "stale".

Having a well dug for you professionally will not only cost you near mid-5 figures, but lets the whole area know you've got water -- not at all a desirable situation for a prepper. Mr. Hyde says not to worry -- you should be easily able to dig a groundwater well yourself almost anywhere.

I realize he writes a variety of these poorly researched books on every topic under the sun and appears to self-publish them, but perhaps a *little* bit of research might be in order -- or he should at least be aware that there are huge swathes of the US and the world as a whole where there's virtually no groundwater, and if there is, you'll need jackhammers and other equipment to access it. I find it difficult to take advice from someone who doesn't realize that most of the Southwest US is desert and finding pockets of groundwater is rather difficult without some detailed knowledge of your area, not to mention that the rest of the country has its arid areas as well.

Dude, look at a DNR map, at least.

If the subtitle hadn't said it was a book for *preppers*, but for homesteaders, I would hate it far less -- maybe taking it to a two.

Save your cash. As a prepper or homesteader, you've got more than enough things you can buy with that money that will actually help you finish your homestead or prep goals.

As a side note: if anyone DOES know of a book on water harvesting that actually provides sane and usable collection methods and realistic sanitation and storage methods, please drop me a line on this comment. Thanks for your help!
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on January 4, 2014
Good info. It would be a lot better with pictures. As it is, no pictures or diagrams. Otherwise, it's a good book.
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on December 24, 2012
This is a decent overview of water husbandry. Everything you need to know is not here, but if you want a place to start this good overview. Several different methods of obtaining clean water are described and give you a good foundation for further research.
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on August 2, 2014
This book sucks. Very small, cheap writing font, and no picture or diagrams at all. You have to look up everything if you want to get a good idea of what is being described. I put this in my pile of useless books. Books I would read only if I had absolutely nothing to do.
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on July 28, 2015
My dad loves prepper books. He thinks they are so fun and he learns a lot reading them. After I got one for him a few months ago, he asked for more. He also made a comment about how he didn't know how to prepare for water needs. So I bought him a couple of water guides for preppers, and he loved both of them! This little book offers so much information about harvesting water and how to store it. It covers everything from purifying water at home, to building a filter or a well, to practical water storage solutions. There is also an entire chapter dedicated to other "water gadgets", which contains such great information. There is so much information about how to use water found naturally, from rain water to wells to more. I really enjoyed this book, and so did my dad! I recommend this book for any preppers looking to know more information about water harvesting. This book provides a ton of tips and tricks to getting the most use out of the water you find or collect. I also appreciated the information detailing the types of storage possible. I am very happy I purchased this book- it may be small, but it is mighty!
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on December 18, 2012
I must say that this ebook has definitely opened my eyes to the way I look at water! This book covers in great detail exactly what its title says, "collection, treatment, and storage of water while living off the grid". The book is an easy read that is easy to understand for even the most inexperienced survivalist or "prepper". I look forward to future reads from this author.
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