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Clue Mysteries

by Hasbro

Price: $48.95 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by SFLAT24 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • 2 to 6 players.
  • Ages 8 and up.
16 new from $40.54 47 collectible from $7.75

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Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 2.3 x 11 x 15.8 inches ; 3.7 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • Origin: USA
  • ASIN: B0006I5G3M
  • Item model number: 42404
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 8 years and up
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #274,951 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
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Product Description

Amazon.com

Who stole Colonel Mustard’s pistol and where is the thief now? Who pilfered Mrs. Peacock’s diary and where can the culprit be found? In this spin-off of the enduring whodunit game, amateur detectives travel through the countryside of Hampshire, England, to answer these questions and more as they assist Inspector Brown in cracking 50 different cases. Players each receive a notebook of potential suspects, in which they can record important clues gathered on their journey around the board. Landing on one of the eight building spaces entitles players to question the character who resides there. Sleuths use one of the secret decoders (a mirror, a spyglass, or a location key) to divulge each character’s secret clues, which are hidden on rotating wheels that fasten inside the game board. To spice things up along the way, there are vehicle spaces that offer shortcuts, open road spaces that require players to draw a Clue card and follow its directions, and movable scene spaces that allow players to block opponents’ paths. Players may make accusations at any time, provided they are resting on the scene space where the offender is hiding. A correct accusation wins the game, but an incorrect guess sends the player out of the game and leaves the crime up to the remaining detectives. --Cristina Vaamonde

Product Description

With Clue Mysteries, you get all the usual suspects, plus six new characters - Rusty, Miss Peach, Lord Gray, Mrs. Meadow-Brook, Prince Azure and Lady Lavender. As armchair Scotland Yard Detectives, you can solve one or more of 50 compelling new crimes before this game is played out. Use your tool kit to decode and investigate each case. The secret mirror tips you off if anyone is lying. If you make the correct arrest, you've won!

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 56 people found the following review helpful By J. Enszer on September 3, 2005
Clue Mysteries is almost Guess Who meets Clue. Players walk around the board visiting the police office, Mr. Boddy's Tudor Mansion, and the residences of the the six original Clue suspects, all to determine the culprit of a crime. The eight locations on the board provide a clue as to the guilty party and his or her whereabouts. The suspects provide hints such as the guilty person wears glasses, or has gray hair, and you use these clues to narrow down your list of possible culprits. One twist is that one of the suspects could by lying.

Overall, this game plays much differently than the original Clue. The setup involves setting each suspect's "residence" to the correct clue for this game--a process that is guided by the playbook that comes with the game. Then a brief introduction to the mystery is read, and the game begins. The players only really need to deduce who is guilty, since landing on Tudor mansion in any given turn gives away the whereabouts of the culprit. Every roll of the die results in either a visit to one of the eight main spots on the board, or the drawing of a card that usually lets you visit one of the eight main spots on the board. The game moves much more quickly than Clue or Clue FX, but mostly because it's so easy to win.

In the end, this game is much simpler and less challenging than other Clue games. Add in the fact that there are only fifty mysteries total, and you drastically reduce the replay value of the game. It's an interesting spin on a classic, but the classic proves to be more entertaining.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. Kulcsar on July 28, 2007
This certainly is an intriguing game. I have played it a couple of times with family and have found it to be quite entertaining.

The gameplay is nothing like Clue. Instead, you are presented a mystery. You travel around the board retrieving clues that lead you to the solution to the mystery. The gameplay is pretty straightforward.

The execution, however, is a bit difficult. The various tools used to decode the clues, I found, add an unnecessary level of difficulty to the game. Getting the mirror in just the right spot, using the magic red filter...all cute but unnecessary tricks that add little to the gameplay. The cases themselves are of moderate difficulty.

The game is well-suited to a mixed group of adults and older children. Adult-only crowds probably will not enjoy this game terribly unless the group has some affinity toward Clue itself. Those familiar with 221B Baker Street will find an uncanning similarity, but the 221B game, I find, has a much better execution and plays much better in an adult-only setting.

This is not a bad game, but play 221B Baker Street if you want more of a challenge.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Robin E. on December 25, 2005
I bought The Clue Mysteries thinking it would be better than the original. I was so wrong!!! It took longer to set up, was more complicated (yet less fun to play) and once you have solved all 50 mysteries (easier to do than you would think), it is worthless. The decoder clues are hard to read, the code wheels are hard to move, and the decoder pieces are easy to lose. My kids are eight and ten and found this game frustrating, boring and not worth the extra time to set up. This was a Christmas flop! Do yourself and your kids a favor. Buy the original, it is more entertaining.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. K. Long on January 18, 2007
My sons and I gave this game to my husband for Christmas. We spent New Years Eve as a family playing this game over and over. It was not too easy for the adults and not too hard for our 8 year old and 11 year old boys. Great family game!!!
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My kids, ages 5, 8, and 10, absolutely LOVE this game. As another reviewer mentioned, it is very much like "Guess Who" in that you basically go around the board collecting clues (is not a man, has gray hair, is wearing a hat) and, by the process of elimination, logically decide who is the criminal.

The itself board is visually appealing - a British town square represented with rich, vibrant colors. There are also clue cards and scene cards that make the gathering of clues somewhat more difficult. But overall, once the game is set up, it is very straightforward to play.

The game includes a manual describing the storyline and dial settings connected with each of the 50 mysteries, and each solution contains a paragraph or two explaining why the "crime" occurred. This book was not written for early elementary kids, so I had to paraphrase for the mystery/solution to make sense to them.

What appealed most to my kids was the way the game plays physically. You get several sturdy cardboard folding "clip boards" with a picture of the 12 suspects on the left and a slot that holds your clue sheet on the right. You must set up the game by twisting the dials in each of the character's homes to the correct number. To decode the clues on the back of the dials, you use either a mirror (to reflect the writing correctly), a key with holes in it that reveal the correct letters for the location of the criminal, and a red magnifying glass, that you hold over the writing to make the clue pop out. This was really fun for my kids.

I can understand how adults might not like this game, since it really is not that challenging. But I definitely recommend it for any child who fancies himself a spy or a detective. It is excellent for teaching basic reasoning too. My kids have enjoyed this game and have played repeatedly.
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