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Hatful of Hollow

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Hatful Of Hollow
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Audio CD, November 9, 1993
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$10.73 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 11 left in stock. Sold by megahitrecords and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

The Smiths tend to be thought of as a band one grows out of--music you listened to as a depressed adolescent and then abandoned when you overcame it all. Such a notion denies them their place in the rock pantheon, not only as an inspiration to countless indie-rock outfits but also as the band that challenged the received wisdom of rock & roll machismo. Fronted by the fey, sexually ambiguous Steven Patrick Morrissey, who married painfully honest lyrics--almost embarrassing in their self-effacement--with arch humor and a melancholic delivery, the British band was quite an anomaly to an America still emerging from the bloated-rock tyranny of the likes of Journey and REO Speedwagon. Hatful of Hollow, released as an import in 1984 and domestically in 1993, is a collection of singles, many recorded live for various radio shows. More-muscular versions of most of the tracks here can be found on the collection Louder Than Bombs, but Hatful has a vitality to it that the studio-bound, somewhat antiseptic Bombs lacks. Check out Johnny Marr's delicate acoustic guitar on the aching "Back to the Old House" or the band's looser workouts of such now-classics as "This Charming Man" and "Still Ill." Two songs not found on other albums make this a must for fans: "Handsome Devil" and "Accept Yourself," a bouncy, jangly number on which Morrissey croons convincingly, "Others conquered love, but I ran / I sat in my room and I drew up a plan." Perfect music for your awkward inner child. --Steve Landau

Amazon.com

The Smiths tend to be thought of as a band one grows out of--music you listened to as a depressed adolescent and then abandoned when you overcame it all. Such a notion denies them their place in the rock pantheon, not only as an inspiration to countless indie-rock outfits but also as the band that challenged the received wisdom of rock & roll machismo. Fronted by the fey, sexually ambiguous Steven Patrick Morrissey, who married painfully honest lyrics--almost embarrassing in their self-effacement--with arch humor and a melancholic delivery, the British band was quite an anomaly to an America still emerging from the bloated-rock tyranny of the likes of Journey and REO Speedwagon. Hatful of Hollow, released as an import in 1984 and domestically in 1993, is a collection of singles, many recorded live for various radio shows. More-muscular versions of most of the tracks here can be found on the collection Louder Than Bombs, but Hatful has a vitality to it that the studio-bound, somewhat antiseptic Bombs lacks. Check out Johnny Marr's delicate acoustic guitar on the aching "Back to the Old House" or the band's looser workouts of such now-classics as "This Charming Man" and "Still Ill." Two songs not found on other albums make this a must for fans: "Handsome Devil" and "Accept Yourself," a bouncy, jangly number on which Morrissey croons convincingly, "Others conquered love, but I ran / I sat in my room and I drew up a plan." Perfect music for your awkward inner child. --Steve Landau


1. William, It Was Really Nothing
2. What Difference Does It Make?
3. These Things Take Time
4. This Charming Man
5. How Soon Is Now?
6. Handsome Devil
7. Hand In Glove
8. Still Ill
9. Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now
10. This Night Has Opened My Eyes
11. You've Got Everything Now
12. Accept Yourself
13. Girl Afraid
14. Back To The Old House
15. Reel Around The Fountain
16. Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want

Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 9, 1993)
  • Original Release Date: 1993
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Off Roster
  • ASIN: B000002MIF
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #119,988 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By tick tock on December 6, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Much of what the Smiths represent has already been addressed in these reviews, so I will share only a few other things in addition to personal recollections of the band.

The Smiths were all too brief a force in music, but what they lacked in time, they made up for in fecundous output. Few groups recorded as much or as brilliantly as the Smiths did in their four year tenure as kings of british pop. Musically, no one even came close to the sheer beauty of what Johnny Marr created. Any guitarist worth his salt will admit as much, but music was only half of the equation. Morrissey is, like Robert Smith and Ian McCullough, a wordsmith of the highest order, creating rarely seen literary parallels between himself and the writers he so often championed.

As for the man's sexuality.... well, for all of the press it has received over the years, it was simply irrelevant to his craft, and he only underscored that notion by remaining aloof and deliberately ambiguous on the subject. For those who actually remember the Smiths while they were together, Morrissey was a declared celibate throughout his partnership with Marr, Joyce and Rourke, having given himself over to his art to such a degree that, when Johnny split, the man was literally bedridden.

The Smiths. Where would I have been without them? Some like to talk of this group as depressing but they got me through some very bad times indeed. Rarely had I heard anyone speak so honestly about his feelings... and those lyrics often reminded me that I was not the only one out there suffering. As unbelievable as it may sound, I think this band may have actually saved my life, and it's hard to speak objectively of such an influence... but anyone who has been desperate and heard the optimism in 'please, please, please...' will understand.
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Moz Marr on August 9, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The Smiths released their second album, Hatful Of Hollow, in November of 1984. The album is basically a compilation, consisting of two BBC sessions (John Peel, 9/21/83 and 4/7/83),

as well as singles released from the previous album and unreleased tracks. The album is worth it simply because of guitarist Johnny Marr's stunning guitar work alone.

1. William, It Was Really Nothing: The album kicks off with one of The Smiths' new singles. A short and upbeat song, it contains the funny "fat girl" verse.

2. What Difference Does It Make (BBC): This song doesn't differ too much of the album version, but it is still a great song.

3. These Things Take Time (BBC): A song that was left off of the debut album in favour of Still Ill, it is a fast song with tight lyrics.

4. This Charming Man (BBC): The BBC version of this single is fantastic. Everything runs well in this song, it is one of the best of this album.

5. How Soon Is Now?: Arguably The Smiths most famous song, this is what gave the band the push they needed during their early years, proving that the band were no one-hit wonders. A long single with a unique sound that only The Smiths can provide.

6. Handsome Devil (BBC): An underrated song which was on the Troy Tate version of the debut album. Morrissey again faces controversy with the lyrics of the song. Is it controversial? You decide.

7. Hand In Glove: The Hatful Of Hollow version of this song was the original single used. In the beginning it fades in, surely a limp start to such a great, hard-rocking track. It was remixed by producer John Porter for the The Smiths debut album.

8. Still Ill (BBC): This version includes a harmonica both at the beginning and the end of the song.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Coleen on June 25, 2004
Format: Audio CD
One of the greatest albums of all-time...extra appealing because most of it is lo-fi, but beautifully lo-fi. Every song is a masterpiece of intelligent vulnerable British pop music. The music, written by Johnny Marr, is brilliantly melodic. The words are worthy of Oscar Wilde, one of lyricist Morrissey's major influences, along with early 60's black and white British working class films like Taste of Honey (snatches of dialogue from this film can be found in the lyrics to This Night Has Opened My Eyes, an extremely powerful song). This album is the greatest Smiths album, and that's saying a LOT, since every Smiths album was BRILLIANT. The Smiths recording career lasted from 1984-1987, but they were extremely prolific. This was their second release, technically a collection of radio recordings and singles, but it works perfectly as an album with its own theme.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Charles R. Grosvenor Jr. on January 8, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I was a little disappointed when I bought this, because it contained a lot of the Peel Session recordings I had recently bought. These are much better quality though, since the recordings I had were of the whole show with the interview parts over-running the songs. Peel tracks- "What Difference Does It Make", "Handsome Devil", "Reel Around the Fountain", "This Night Has Opened My Eyes", "Still Ill", "This Charming Man", and "Back to the Old House". There are also three tracks from the David Jensen show (which I've seen passed off as Peel Sessions, but arent!). "These Things Take Time", "You've Got Everything Now", and "Accept Yourself".
Some performers do these in studio songs as throwaway tracks, but if you've heard the Peel interviews, you know that John Peel was one of the first people to play the Smiths on his show, and hence they're not only different, but sometimes even better versions than what you get on the regular editions. If you're a completionist, you must own this CD. If you're a casual fan, and may have some of these tracks already on various other CDs (the regular album release), don't worry about owning a second version of these songs. They're unique enough to stand on their own in most cases. Skip "best of" collections altogether. There are only four or five albums that consist of the bulk of the Smiths cannon, you're much better off with them all, than with the poor compilations that have been released to date. I own thousands of CDs, and nothing really stands out like the Smiths did during the 80s. Nobody sounds like them before or since.
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