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Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh (Metropolitan Museum of Art Series) Hardcover – November 11, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0300111392 ISBN-10: 0300111398 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Series: Metropolitan Museum of Art Series
  • Hardcover: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art (November 11, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300111398
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300111392
  • Product Dimensions: 12.3 x 9.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #310,617 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Apart from the cunning and beautiful Cleopatra, little is known about Egypt's women rulers. The editors of this glorious exhibition catalogue seek to illuminate the life of one of these women. Drawing on archeological discoveries of the remains of her rule, Roehrig, a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and her coauthors offer a magnificent portrait of this remarkable woman and all aspects of Eyptian life in the 18th Dynasty, from religion and politics to art and jewelry. In 1473 B.C., Hatshepsut ascended the throne as co-regent with her husband, Thutmose II. After his death, she became ruler of Egypt, taking the name "King of Upper and Lower Egypt." She consolidated the country culturally and led military campaigns against Nubia and Kush. Hatshepsut's innovative construction projects included processional roads and 100-foot-high obelisks. Abandoning the traditional closed-off temple structure, her temple in Deir el-Bahri in Thebes was opened to the light with colonnades. Soon after her death, Hatshepsut's successor erased almost every trace of her reign, but this beautiful book draws on the remains with 386 illustrations—226 of them in color—to offer a splendid testimony to the life of this oft-forgotten Egyptian ruler. (Jan.)Correction: The author of Crunchy Cons (reviewed Dec. 19) is Rod Dreher.
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Review

“Readily accessible to general readers and will enthrall library patrons. . . . Highly recommended for all public and academic libraries.”


(Library Journal)

Customer Reviews

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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Huston on May 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the best books that I've seen on the art, symbolism and life in Ancient Egypt. Set within the reign of Hatshepsut, a royal wife and queen who transformed herself into Pharaoh, it looks at the lives of royal women from the images and personal artifacts that have been left behind.

Each chapter takes a look at aspects of Hatshepsut's reign and life, as well as the architect Senenmut, who may or may not have been her lover, but was also her most trust confidant -- and to whom she turned the education and care of her daughter, Neferure. One section that was of particular interest to me were the displays of women's lives and those of children, a topic that usually gets overlooked. There are exquisite pieces of jewelry, goldwork and tiny statues -- one of a small child, no longer than a pinkie finger, and holding an unbloomed lotus blossom, was particularly poignant. Along with precious objects there were also everyday items from mirrors, toiletry objects, small jars used to hold cosmetics and oils, to boxes and games, and several very fragile pieces of furniture of exquisite craftsmanship. All of these are shown in the catalog, each one with a detailed description and what it was meant to be used for.

Another aspect that I really enjoyed was how Hatshepsut changed the artistic styles that were in use in Egypt, and how it influenced later depictions of rulers. Icongraphy that shows her wearing male attire, false beard and holding symbols of regal authority are throughout, as well as the unusual temple that she designed and built at Deir El-Bahri where she intended to be worshipped and remembered throughout eternity.

The essays are clear and managed to be free of most jargon which would drive away most armchair archaelogists and non-specialists.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Once again the Metropolitan Museum has enriched the history and art of Egypt books with the publication of this very impressive catalogue that accompanies the exhibition 'Hatshepsut : From Queen to Pharaoh'. While many other museum exhibitions have been inundated with people attending the King Tut behemoths, this exhibition focuses on Hatshepsut, daughter of King Thutmose I, and wife and half-sister of King Thutmose II, who in the mid-15th century BC gradually acquired kingly status and power for herself. Her reign was twenty years in length as a woman pharaoh.

The catalogue that accompanies this traveling exhibition is beautifully designed and is full of extant drawings and objects that demonstrate her influence on history, culture, monumental art, and architecture of the late 17th and early 18th Dynasties. The writing is of the highest order and divides the book into "Setting the Scene," "Hatshepsut and Her Court," "Hatshepsut's Building Projects," "Decorative Arts," "The Proscription," and "The Aftermath." In addition to the written information, the catalogue has superb reproductions of jewelry, pottery, furniture, reliefs, and statuary. Then, sadly, the writing includes detailed descriptions of the demolition and desecration of the important monuments from Hatshepsut's reign.

Here is a moment in history brought to life by a group of fine curators and writers, suggesting that as much as we think we know about the past, there are always surprises to be brought to our attention by the museums of the world. A fine book, this. Grady Harp, March 06
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By John Matlock on April 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Think of early Egypt and you think of King Tut and Cleopatra. Those two, however, are not the sum total of Egyptian history. This book is basically a catalog of the collection regarding Hatshepsut a most interesting woman. She was the daughter of a king, and was married to her half brother. Upon his death the kingship transferred to his son by a secondary wife with Hatshepsut as regent for her nephew. Later she became co-ruler and king in her own right. Got all that?

The collection, made over many years included numerous pieces that were deliberately smashed about twenty years after her death. Because such fragments were not of value they waited until recent times when they were patiently assembled into the statues that they are today. In addition the collection contains hundreds of objects produced during her reign. The items are described by some twenty-five noted Egyptologists in addition to the three authors.

The book is of large format and profusely illustrated with perhaps 400 pictures, about half of which are in color. This book will remain after the exhibit is gone.
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