Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Haunted Asheville Paperback – September 1, 1996


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, September 1, 1996
$11.65 $0.93

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "Landline" by Rainbow Rowell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 173 pages
  • Publisher: Shadowbox Pubns (September 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0964937026
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964937024
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,288,888 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Joshua P. Warren is a world-renowned paranormal investigator who currently appears on the Discovery Channel series "X-Ops" and hosts a regional radio show, "Speaking of Strange." He has also been regularly featured on TLC, the Travel Channel, and the History Channel. As president of his research team, L.E.M.U.R., Warren uses scientific methods to document unexplainable activity. He wrote the best-selling Haunted Asheville, which refers to his home city in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina and How to Hunt Ghosts. His articles have been published internationally, and he has been covered by such mainstream periodicals as Southern Living, Delta Sky, FATE, New Woman, The New York Times, and FHM.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By William R. Hancock on February 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
Asheville, NC, is a beautiful place. It is larger and more sophisticated than the hills-'n-hollers locales to the west, moving towards the Smokies (and is certainly more Cosmopolitan than the fictional "Mayberry" of Andy and Opie mystique), yet it
refuses...for the time being...to give up that "small town" ambience and friendliness it still possesses in exchange for "big-city cynical cool". Much of the famous charm still remains.
Some quirkiness, too. Asheville is the only place where I have ever seen...at one location and in one single building...a combination funeral home and taxidermy shop.
And Asheville has its ghosts. The Pink Lady of the Grove Park Inn has long-term regional renown, and since the internet spreads information around so thoroughly and quickly, her reputation is undoubtedly more widespread now. She has probably gone "national' by now and is "up there' in prominence with South Carolina's "Grey Man", Chicago's "Resurrection Mary", and a few others.
In "Haunted Asheville", local resident Joshua P. Warren (a dedicated ghosthunter/paranormalist and writer) has done a good job of covering the traditions and over-the-years sighting accounts of this intriguing phantom. Through his own scientific researches and the accumulative weight of the witness testimony (plus the reliability of that testimony), it is a pretty safe bet that there IS a "pink lady" haunt at Grove Park...and likely some others.
The one annoying aspect to this puzzle-in-pink is the curious lack of anything substantial as to a HISTORICITY for the haunting. It is SAID that this was a young woman who either fell, or jumped (or was pushed or thrown?) from several floors up into the open Palm Court of the inn...."sometime in the 1920s". Well WHEN? 1924? 1927? 1929? And what was her name?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. E. Lednum on May 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
I live in Asheville and was looking forward to reading this and learning more about the ghost stories about the area. I was lead to believe that the book was going to take a more in-depth look at the stories and their origins, but it really didn't offer much information. I understand that it is difficult to get more information on stories that are that old and passed down through local folklore, but I was still disappointed since that was what I expected to get. But where it lacks in ghost history, it did offer a lot in history of various buildings and such in Asheville. I really enjoyed learning about the old pauper graveyard and some of the origins of some of the landmarks in the area. I also found that 90% of the photos really didn't have anything to offer -- most were just generic photos of people or places, and a few were sort of fake ghost photos. He didn't try to pass those off as real, but it didn't really say anything about them, so it was just sort of weird.

So to summarize, it offered a nice basic overview of the local ghost stories, but if you are looking to this book for more in-depth learning about any of those stories, you will be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is a wonderfully written, thorougly entertaining book of great ghost stories. The stories are told in a very compelling, "Page-Turning" way. The first time I read the book I finished it during a 2 hour flight. It is reread around the time of Halloween at my home and has become a "tradition". We love the book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Mountaineer on August 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
If you grew up in Asheville you've heard these stories before,in fact the mostly famously told story is about 'Helen's Bridge/Zealandia Castle' which so many individuals have told that story in so many variations that it's practically a farce.The pink lady is supposedly true and I've heard this transparent story many times,but the ghost has been rarely seen.In fact the history of the Pink Lady that Grove Park Inn is so proud of is used to market the place with no more class than a cheap tourist attraction within an overpriced resort.Think about it, the cover of the book originally had a digitally designed Pink Lady with Grove Park Inn on the cover-Asheville's most expensive and oldest hotel has a ghost in the main inn...sure that kind of advertising isn't going to attract some naive individual to come stay at some pricey hotel in room 545 in hopes of seeing a ghost.Asheville is considered to be a beautiful place by many(which it is),some consider it to be an artsy/cultured city,but regardless Asheville has been recognized by it's citizens as a tourist attracted city that's grown over the past 20 years and Josh Warren just used what information he could find to make a book and jack up the tourism rate.The guy's a joke he used the same approach when he wrote the fictional book 'The Evil In Asheville' which boasts on the cover a picture of the Zealandia Castle (which was torn down and re-built utilizing some of the original stone as a mansion)and yet the story takes place in Asheville....how unexpected.Like I said this book was meant to reel in tourists,retold with semi-accurate information.Unfortunately,old-timey mountain folklore tales on areas in north carolina such as The Devil's Tramping Ground or The Brown Mountain Lights may leave people questioning these legends but the stories never change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search