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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Forget Felix, the Album is Still Great
Despite Felix Papalarddi's frankly hideous/generic production values, the listener cannot ignore the power of the Dead Boys performance. The group as a whole had matured into a true musical powerhouse with a tag-team, fairly intricate guitar duo like Chrome and Zero, and a rhythm sextion as tight as Jeff Magnum and Johnny Blitz (pre-knife fight). The true magic is exuded...
Published on December 15, 2003 by Borne Too Loose

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hey, it's still the Dead Boys
It's been reissued by Cheetah Crome as "Third Generation Nation" but this is the original 2nd Dead Boys Lp, in the correct order (no bonus tracks though). The first album is brilliant, definative punk rock, this ain't the first album. Both the songwriting and production are noticably weak, however, it's still the Dead Boys and that makes it better than your...
Published on August 9, 2000


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Forget Felix, the Album is Still Great, December 15, 2003
By 
Despite Felix Papalarddi's frankly hideous/generic production values, the listener cannot ignore the power of the Dead Boys performance. The group as a whole had matured into a true musical powerhouse with a tag-team, fairly intricate guitar duo like Chrome and Zero, and a rhythm sextion as tight as Jeff Magnum and Johnny Blitz (pre-knife fight). The true magic is exuded by Stiv Bators though, with his slurred, under-enunciated, pure-attitude vocal performance. "I Won't Look Back," "Third Generation Nation," and the cover of the Stone's "Tell Me" stand out as my favorites, but the clincher of the album is the closer, "Ain't It Fun." (Later covered by the now defunct Guns N' Roses on the album 'The Spaghetti Incident?!') With a band as volatile and dangerous as the Dead Boys, "Ain't It Fun" stands as a great coda to the most underrated band in rock n' roll.
The only thing that could've improved this album is the absence of Pappalardi, but you can find versions of these songs at their rawest on live recordings. I found the alternate takes of the sessions in the hopes that it could be a repeat of the YL&S mixes, but sadly, they aren't any better. I prefer this mix, and these songs are favorites. Don't bother beong bogged down by Felix, just know that all the Dead Boys probably called him a load whenever his back was turned.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars what was he thinking?, July 14, 2006
Felix P. screwed this LP from the get go. Way to 'radio friendly' as other reviewers have noted. On 'Young, loud..', Genya Raven captured their sound. Great bass, guitars in front (and LOUD) and Cheetah Chrome's lead even louder!

'..Children' production is just too homoginized--too slick. The tunes are DB classics though, Tell Me, Ain't it Fun, Catholic Boy, and of course Son Of Sam.

After Stiv's death, the scope of unreleased studio/live/rehearsal material of the Dead Boys became a fact.

Some good---most barely tolerable

get the 2 DB studio LP's to start and then get the Live @ CBGB.

Although video of the DB is semi-rare, try to find it and then match up the live versions with the studio versions and you can see that they were a GREAT live R & R band
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars These guys were good., August 1, 2005
By 
I didn't even know this was still available, my copy is an old vinyl record, and I got it at a time when I bought and taped recordings by numerous punk bands, and was WIDELY criticized for doing it. I must've been precocious, because the music I liked back then earned me a lot of ridicule, only for the same people to come around later, and actually see something in it.

The Dead Boys have all the elements of late '70's punk; torn clothes, weird hair, disheveled all-around appearance, violent reputation, and so forth. But underneath, is a top-notch band. I admit to not knowing all the specifics about the knife fight that nearly killed drummer Johnny Blitz, but listen to him here; he plays as well as anyone I've heard elsewhere. I remember reading that the person (people?) who attacked him "tried to cut his balls off," and I've always wondered how he fared after.

This was a band that could play anything they put any effort into, and did it well. Their version of "Tell Me" is every bit as good as, and I think a little better than, the Stones' original. The opener of this set, "Third Generation Nation," sets the mood, they were what was happening at the time, even though they weren't chart-toppers. Real talent often isn't.

They show that they had no sacred cows, as you hear in "(I don't want to be no) Catholic Boy," and the addition of two guys from The Ramones is a nice touch. "Ah-Men!"

My own personal two favorites are "Son Of Sam," and "Ain't It Fun?", "Sam" being about the killings at the time by serial killer /prison inmate turned minister (imagine my surprise), David Berkowitz. The section in the middle has a mini-depiction of one of the killings, footsteps, a gunshot, and this scream that will make you cringe, and the tribal sounding drums, peppered with sirens, has this surreal effect, reflecting the fear that hovered over Yonkers, New York at the time, really heavy-hitting stuff.

"Ain't It Fun?" is, I guess what could be called a ballad, it's got an emotional melody, really expressive guitar solos (Cheetah Chrome is a very good guitarist), and heart-felt lyrics about someone befriended by the band who lived a short, tragic life, with lines like "I punched my fist right through the glass, and I didn't even feel it, it happened so fast," just a summing-up of someone's life, with a voice at the end, in the distance, saying, "I'm dead, I'm dead..."

You know they were onto something pretty good when, this many years later, I can still remember their stage names; Cheetah Chrome, Johnny Blitz, Jimmy Zero, Stiv Bators, and Jeff Magnum.

And it took me by surprise a little while ago, to hear that Stiv Bators mysteriously died; though I guess it shouldn't have, with the Johnny Blitz incident and all, but it usually is a surprise when something like this happens.

All said though, The Dead Boys had a good, solid band, worth listening to.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There ain't no future and there ain't no past, May 7, 2007
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Despite the fact that Cleveland's The Dead Boys' "Young Loud & Snotty" is considered a punk rock classic and "We Have Come For Your Children" a lesser effort, you shouldn't sell this CD short. It's even reflected by the fact that Sire has yet to release this CD stateside. Ignore the naysayers. If "Snotty" never existed, "We Have Come For Your Children" would be placed on the pedestal it deserves.

Attempting to channel all their nihilism and violence under producer Felix Pappalardi's over-slick production, this album is still loud, fast and chaotic. Stiv lets loose with his Iggy Pop idolization on the classic "3rd Generation Nation," and "Son Of Sam" is an exercise in Alice Cooper worship (circa "Killer"). "Son Of Sam" is harrowingly theatrical, complete with screams, gunshots and dog barks punctuated by Bators' snarl.

Bators had the full support of his bandmates. Cheetah Chrome and Jimmy Zero may be two of Punk's most under-rated guitarists. They could pull off the Ramones Roar on "3rd Generation Nation" and "I Won't Look Back" but also had a rarely mentioned sophistication that underpins "Son Of Sam" and "Ain't It Fun." There is also a great deal of irony of Stiv Bators singing "Ain't it fun when you know that you're gonna die young" (since he really did) and the haunting voice of co-writer Peter Laughner moaning "I'm dead" as the song fades. (He died from pancreatitis brought on by drug and alcohol abuse before the song was released.) "Ain't It Fun" is a classic moment where the irony and punk-theater matched up perfectly, stellar enough for Guns and Roses to have recorded it.

So forget all the bad stuff you heard about this album. With only two studio albums in their library and (with the exception of Bators solo and Lords Of The New Church albums) none of the other band members having a career to speak of afterwards, "We Have Come For Your Children" remains a memorable document of the CBGB's scene.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Rock albums of the 70s, November 30, 2006
As you've read from numerous reviews, this album doesn't exactly capture the DBs in their brutal element.

Sire attempted to market them as some kind of Post-Glam, New Wave act in the hopes they could have a hit like so many British acts of the day. Add to this the fact that Felix Pappalardi literally had it in for them and you get a production that wants to bleach out any traces of life.

So it's a tribute to the fire and invention of the Dead Boys that this album succeeds despite it all. Think about how Bowie's nearly inept production of "Raw Power" still managed to yield a classic.

The DBs always stressed a muscular guitar sound. Here the guitars are pared back to hollow squeals. The bass is pushed way up in the mix. The drums sound like mechanical clicks. Stiv's voice sounds oh so brittle and there's a strange reverb spread over everything. A definite New Wave/Power Pop tone results.

Rather than sabotage, the songs come off ironically more modern and timeless. Regardless of what the band themselves say about this, it seems to make perfect sense when you compare it to Stiv's later work. Don't pass it up.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The intro of Son Of Sam alone is worth buying this, September 5, 2012
By 
I've listened to this album and the first Deadboys album (Young, Loud and Snotty) numerous times, and I've come to like this one even more. Young, Loud And Snotty is filled with stone-cold, in-your-face classics, but this album is more interesting to me. It's more ambitious, and has a more reflective, intriguing quality. It's been said that the production isn't hard-edged enough, and this is certainly true on some of the songs, but it adds a certain melancholy, cinematic atmosphere to Ain't It Fun, I Won't Look Back, Big City, and especially Son Of Sam, my favorite song. The intro alone is amazing, setting up the song as a dark tour into someone's troubled mind. There's an undercurrent of sadness amidst the expected rock and roll fury in I Won't Look Back (which has some great backing vocals) and Third Generation Nation, and I Don't Wanna Be No Catholic Boy, Flame Thrower Love (which has a great opening with crashing drums and thunderous guitars) and Dead And Alive are classic rockers. All told, I think this is the best album by the Deadboys. It has a certain depth and variety to it that the first one doesn't have, and the troubling vibe of Son Of Sam still haunts me to this day. Stiv Bators' one of a kind, sneering voice voice is very memorable (especially on Ain't It Fun), and the furious guitars and rhythm section back him up perfectly. The songs I've mentioned above are especially good, but all the songs go together very well. The whole album is pretty much flawless to me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Dead Boys have come for your children!, July 3, 2012
I'll start by saying what everyone else says... Ready? It's not as good as the first album. The album's production is usually blamed for it's poor reception, but I would disagree. This album sounds great, the real problem is the mix. The guitar solos and leads are buried too low, especially in the first song, and you know what they say about first impressions...

Not every track suffers from a bad mix. Son Of Sam, Ain't It Fun and Calling On You are perfect examples of what this record gets right. They sound great and they are mixed properly. I'd also say those are the three best tracks on the record. There's not a single bad song on here though. Is the first record better? Yes. Is this record awful? No way. There's an "alternate" version of the album called 3rd Generation Nation which I would advise against. It pretty much sounds exactly the same except that it is missing some overdubs and the track order is different. It's inferior and this is better, trust me on that.

If you like the Dead Boys I would also recommend the first record by Chelsea. That record kinda sounds like the UK punk version of the Dead Boys and it's album cover looks almost identical to We Have Come For Your Children.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good 2nd LP, February 4, 2006
By 
jbufka2 (Detroit, MI) - See all my reviews
While I agree with most of the reviewers that the Dead Boys first LP is the better of the two. This, their 2nd LP, is not without it's moments. Son of Sam and Ain't It Fun are two great songs. If you have the first LP and still want more Dead Boys, give this one a try.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Of The Two Best Punk Albums Of All Time, December 24, 2002
The Dead Boys I think are the only band in history to combine good guitar playing with punk music. It's really an incredible album. If you're a punk fan, or even a heavy rock fan, than I suggest you get this album. The Dead Boys show you what Rock and Punk and music in general is all about.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The imfamous Stiv Bators!, February 10, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
We Have Come For Your Children is a full speed follow up to Young Loud And Snotty!
These two discs should be sold together,for any person into the PUNK scene.
The Dead Boys where at the head of the game, with Stiv Bators vocals and the great
band to back him up. I recommend If you can get a DVD of the Dead Boys, get it.
You will not regret it, only if you could have scene them LIVE.Stiv Bators was
one great entertainer,with him cutting himself on stage. His career didn't end
with the demise of the Dead Boys. He had a great SOLO career also!
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