Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $3.47 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Head Cases: Stories of Br... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath Paperback – April 28, 2009


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.53
$6.22 $1.30

Frequently Bought Together

Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath + Over My Head: A Doctor's Own Story of Head Injury from the Inside Looking Out + Where is the Mango Princess? A Journey Back from Brain Injury
Price for all three: $38.14

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (April 28, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374531951
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374531959
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been brought to the fore by the war in Iraq, but not only soldiers experience it. Mason, a case manager in Tulsa, Okla., for people living with TBI, writes with passion and urgency about the unheralded but compelling stories of Americans injured in car accidents or through a miscalculation while snowboarding. Their lives are disrupted by seizures, memory loss, psychosis. One of Mason's clients is an ambitious former air force officer who now goes into waking trances in which he thinks he's dead, as a result of a herpes virus emerging from its hiding place to invade his brain. Mason lays out a damning indictment of the health-care system's failure to provide facilities and services that millions like his clients need. He also tells stories of tremendous courage and perseverance as survivors and their families work to re-establish the everyday skills they had before their injury. The strange effects of neurological damage will draw fans of Oliver Sacks, but Mason's poignant and caring accounts of his clients' lives are sure to touch the hearts of a wide range of readers. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Tulsa-based brain-injury case manager Mason presents the stories of a dozen clients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI) with startling candor not just about how their lives and those of their families were altered by the disability but about the scant assistance available on a national scale for TBI victims. The book’s publicity claims readers will come away “astonished at the fragility of the brain.” But who doesn’t already know that? On the other hand, many don’t know that TBI can be caused from either without (an auto accident, a fall) or within (a tumor or even a common virus that many endure with minor symptoms yet that can travel to the brain), changing a life literally in an instant. Additionally, most don’t know how to differentiate between behaviors caused by TBI and those caused by psychosis. Cast against a backdrop of slim resources crying for more aid, the stories are heartbreakingly stark, like so many slaps upside the head, but, coming from a man who too often must deliver bad news, hard to counterpunch. --Donna Chavez --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Michael Mason is an editor, writer, speaker, and journalist based in Tulsa. His works have appeared in several newspapers and magazines, including Discover, The New York Times, and The Believer. Mason has also appeared as a guest on several national media outlets, including the Lehrer Newshour, CBS News, NPR's Morning Edition and The Diane Rehm Show. In 2010, he founded This Land Press, Oklahoma's first New Media company, and serves as its editor.

Mason's assignments have taken him into the Iraqi war zone, behind Vatican walls, and into aftermath of the World Trade Center. Along the way, he has built a reputation for noteworthy journalism. When Mason's article, "Dead Men Walking," appeared in Discover magazine, it ignited a national debate about the treatment of brain injured soldiers.

Mason's first book, Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath, is an exploration into the harsh realities endured by brain injury survivors. Since the publication of Head Cases, he has maintained a role as one of the country's leading advocates for people with brain injury-he has addressed the Congressional Task Force on Brain Injury and has served as president of the Brain Injury Association of Oklahoma.

A native of Oklahoma, Mason has a long history of involvement in the Tulsa community. He has been a past president of the Tulsa Artist Coalition, and founded the popular cult journal Me Head, which reached more than 300,000 readers a month online. He has written articles for both the Tulsa World and The Oklahoman. He regularly speaks at local events, such as the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Symposium, and dedicates much of his editorial efforts at This Land Press toward community improvement.

Mason is also a member of the PEN American Center. He has served as a board member of the Academy of Certified Brain Injury Specialists and as a past president of the Brain Injury Association of Oklahoma, and he has sat on two advisory councils committed to the bettering of treatment for veterans with brain injury.

In addition to his writing projects, Mason has produced several feature works that have played on public radio stations across the nation. In a project with Tulsa author Jeff Martin, Mason produced one of Oklahoma's most popular podcasts, "Goodbye Tulsa," a show that told the story of Tulsa through the lives of its citizens. Through This Land Press, Mason continues to produce audio content oriented to life in middle America.

In the fall of 2010, Mason left his job as a brain injury case manager to devote his energies to This Land Press. In its first several months of publication, This Land Press achieved international recognition for its journalism. Mason is currently at work on a non-fiction book called The Human Assembly: The Discovery, History, and Industry of our Parts, Tissues, and Organs, to be published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
28
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
1
See all 32 customer reviews
HEAD CASES is extremely well written, and was pleasure to read.
Marinella Glossa
The book reads just as you may expect to see on the Discovery Channel.
Fred Finney
This is a terrific book that humanizes traumatic brain injuries.
E. Crawford

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By C. Elk on April 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was cringing all the way through this book, horrified at the accidents and the run-around that the injured get in our pathetic excuse for a health care system. Mason doesn't go too much into neuroscientific details, but focuses instead on how the injury has affected the injured, their lives and livelihood, their friends and family, and how they have learned or failed to learn to live with their deficits. Each chapter is a biography. Some are hopeful, all are illuminating.
I hope this book helps to raise public awareness about what a desperate state we are in with regards to being able to provide cost-effective care and therapy for people with TBI. Hundreds of brain-injured soldiers are coming back from Iraq and will need help integrating back into society.
Brookhaven Hospital in Tulsa, where the author is based, offers care that is tailored to the needs of each individual. No two brain injuries are the same and no two roads to recovery take the same route. This type of treatment needs to be available at more facilities, and it needs to be available to everybody who needs it, not just the wealthy.
Read it, give it to a friend, wear a helmet.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Walter L. Larimore on April 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book was a very pleasant surprise and not at all what I had expected.

Thinking, even fearing, that this book might be an intense or even arduous exegesis of the neuroscience of brain injury, I found instead a series of captivating and absorbing dramas that opened for me a door into the not-often-seen difficult lives, debilitating circumstances, damaged brains, and inspirational hearts and souls of a number of victims of brain injury.

Mr. Mason, with the compassion and astute observation of a skilled case worker, relates story after story that are as captivating and inspiring as they are sobering and heartbreaking.

I felt like I met, came to know, even empathized with and admired, the involuntary stars of each tragedy. I was introduced to their loved ones, learned about their pasts and hometowns, was shown in dreadful detail their horrible accidents, and exposed to the myriad obstacles and difficulties to which these amazing people and their families are exposed each day.

I found myself cheering, with Mr. Mason, their victories, and joined him in a swelling admiration for their courage and spunk.

Along with these compelling stories is the fascinating and fantastic journey upon which Mr. Mason took me - a rollercoaster ride into the "the brain injury capital of the world" at a remarkable hospital thirty miles north of Baghdad on the grounds of Balad Air Base.

The picture Mr. Mason paints of the amazing skills of our military healthcare professionals in providing the best care in the world to brain injured military personnel, innocent civilians, or even enemy combatants, is as astonishing as it is wonderful.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Marinella Glossa on May 5, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I loved this book and read it in one sitting. As the mom of a TBI victim, it was an eye opening book. I felt a little disheartened by the grim reality presented by the author (he is a little gloomy .. ) but I think the book will inspire me to continue to be "a squeaky wheel" on my daughter's behalf.

I have QUITE the head injury library at this point, and many are written by survivors or family members with or without the help of a "ghost writer" and i think this leads to some pretty questionable writing and some of them are really hard to get through. HEAD CASES is extremely well written, and was pleasure to read.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By James R. Robison on April 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I confess...I skip the health section of Time Magazine and Newsweek. It's just not my thing. So when I started reading Mason's book on brain injuries, I didn't think I'd make it very far.

I was dead wrong.

This book wraps the reader in human drama while delving into the mysterious world of head trauma. It is fascinating because it is not just about science, but about people.

Head Cases is a great read -- not just for those into science and medicine, but for everyone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Dorn on April 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Mason opens our eyes to the realities of modern medicine, we learn that fixing the outside is often the simpler part of the equation. His insight & the passion he puts into each story makes for a captivating read. I walked away from this book realizing that unless we want to resign ourself to cities filed with "the walking dead" we must change the way society approaches Brain injury, this book is a call to arms, that's why I recommend you pass it along to friends & family-- or better yet have them buy their own & pass it on.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brandon D. Scott on April 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is much more than informative, it brings to life the personal stories of each TBI victim it memorializes. Every individual account grips you and evokes a plethora of emotions. The author's scientifically enlightening and entertaining narratives leave you feeling a personal connection with the survivors. It is difficult to fathom the horrors some of these people have endured, but the author passionately and respectfully relays deeply personalized chronicles of their trials and tests, all while helping raise awareness of these types of catastrophic injuries. Injuries that could have easily happened to you or I or someone we love. Head Cases has given me a much better appreciation, and respect, for the fascinating machine inside my noggin. Though it has kind of made me want to go out and buy a helmet and a Volvo.

Definitely worth the read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews