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The Heart of Midlothian (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – February 15, 2009


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Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (February 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199538395
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199538393
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 1.1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #785,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Scrupulous and comprehensive editing (by Clare Lamont)."--Ian Duncan, Yale University


"Excellent texts. Because they include both Scott's introductions and notes and the invaluable notes by Lamont, these texts are preferable to the volumes in the Edinburgh edition of Scott."--Robert Mayer, Oklahoma State University


--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Founded in 1906 by J.M. Dent, the Everyman Library has always tried to make the best books ever written available to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible price. Unique editorial features that help Everyman Paperback Classics stand out from the crowd include: a leading scholar or literary critic's introduction to the text, a biography of the author, a chronology of her or his life and times, a historical selection of criticism, and a concise plot summary. All books published since 1993 have also been completely restyled: all type has been reset, to offer a clarity and ease of reading unique among editions of the classics; a vibrant, full-color cover design now complements these great texts with beautiful contemporary works of art. But the best feature must be Everyman's uniquely low price. Each Everyman title offers these extensive materials at a price that competes with the most inexpensive editions on the market-but Everyman Paperbacks have durable binding, quality paper, and the highest editorial and scholarly standards. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

That, however, does not detract from the plot and characterizations.
porthos
Written in 1818, "The Heart Of Midlothian" is one of the most famous works of the great Scottish Writer, Sir Walter Scott.
Warren Mars
The result is a great, if sometimes gregarious novel which you will certainly enjoy.
mp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 42 people found the following review helpful By mp on October 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
Sir Walter Scott's 1818 novel, "The Heart of Mid-Lothian" deals with events in the lives of the Deans family from 1736 to the early 1750's. The novel begins with the 1736 Porteous riots, in which disgruntled citizens of Edinburgh storm the local prison to take revenge on a needlessly cruel official. With Anglo-Scottish relations in a tailspin and Queen Caroline levying a rash of punishments against Edinburgh in the background, the action of "Mid-Lothian" commences.
The principle heroes of the novel are Jeanie Deans and her longtime suitor, Reuben Butler. The two rustic born youths are from differently oriented Presbyterian ancestry - their parents' religious differences force an almost interminable delay in the progress of their affections. Butler's extensive formal and ministerial education notwithstanding, his financial position is such that he cannot comfortably propose a union to Jeanie's father. Further complication arises when Jeanie's younger and more impulsive half-sister, Effie, is seduced and later accused of murdering her child. The majority of the novel details Jeanie's attempts to question the impropriety of the judgement against her sister, and her interactions with the world outside of provincial northern Scotland.
As always, Scott deals with a range of social, economic, political, and legal issues. Among these in "Mid-Lothian" is the right of the Scottish to control their own internal disputes - are Scottish law and British law compatible? On a related tip, the novel calls into question whether the governors of the people have sufficient sympathy with and understanding of all the people they govern.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Leslie Richford on March 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
Having been asked to spend a few weeks at a remote Naval base in the former “German Democratic Republic”, I had plenty of time on my hands to read Walter Scott’s “Heart of Midlothian” in the Oxford World’s Classics edition (with notes, 580 pages), something that whiled away the time more than satisfactorily, this novel being perhaps the best that Scott ever wrote. In his previous Waverley novel, “Old Mortality”, he had described the unruly, extreme tendencies of Covenanter Calvinism. In this book, he shows us the other side of the strict Biblical piety he had got to know during his own childhood. The novel is based on two true stories, the Porteous riots in Edinburgh, and the heroics of one Helen Walker, a simple Scots lass who walked to London to save her sister from an unjustly imposed death penalty for child murder. Scott’s way of combining these two stories, making the leader of the riot to be the father of the child that had disappeared, is neither historical nor particularly convincing, and the fate of the child is, indeed, a horrible one. But for me, the most interesting aspect of the book was the description of the Christianity practised by Lowland Scots at the beginning of the 18th century. Davie Deans, the father of Scott’s heroine, is something of a Cameronian or strict covenanter, and it is, perhaps, his very strictness which drives his young daughter Effie to the worldly pursuits that he so much abhorrs.Read more ›
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mr Peter G George on February 12, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Heart of Midlothian is best known today in Scotland as the name of a football team from Edinburgh. Many may be aware that the team took its name from a novel, but Scott's story is little read nowadays so few indeed are aware that the novel took its name from a prison. This prison was situated in the centre of Edinburgh in the county of Midlothian, until it was torn down in 1817, and no doubt a certain irony was intended when it became known as The Heart of Midlothian. Scott's novel focuses on the prison firstly in its description of the Porteous riot of 1736 when a mob stormed the prison in order to revenge itself on a prisoner who it seemed was to escape justice. More importantly it is to this prison that Effie Deans is sent for the crime of child murder, because she has kept the fact of her pregnancy secret and cannot produce the child. Effie faces the prospect of execution even though there is no evidence that she has killed her baby. The law considered her secrecy as evidence enough of her guilt. This leads to a terrible dilemma for the novel's heroine Jeannie Deans. If she would merely say that she had been told of her sister's pregnancy, Effie would go free. Jeannie will go to any lengths to free her sister, but she will not lie. In her search for justice Jeannie must walk to London and her extraordinary journey takes her to the very top of 18th century society.

Jeannie Deans is the greatest of Scott's heroines. She is strong both physically and morally. While she may not have the education of some of those she meets, she more than matches their learning with her own common sense. It is the investigation of her character, which makes the novel so interesting.
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