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Heartbeat Paperback – September 27, 2005


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Reprint edition (September 27, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060540249
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060540241
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #47,441 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-7 A tenderhearted story told in spare, free-verse poems. Annie, 12, takes great pleasure in running, but has no interest in racing or becoming a member of a team. For her, the pure joy comes from feeling the earth beneath her bare feet and the wind in her face. The experience is totally different for her moody friend and running partner, Max. For him, running is a way to escape his personal problems. Annie's comfortable, tightly knit world begins to unravel when she learns that her mother is pregnant and she becomes increasingly aware that her beloved Grandpa, a former champion racer, is slipping into dementia. She is a resourceful, self-possessed kid who takes comfort in the familiar but is able to face change and take it in stride. She marvels at the new life taking shape in her midst (her father provides month-by-month summations of the baby's development) and mourns the loss of her grandfather's strong and nurturing wisdom. School, art class, and chores appear throughout the verses, creating an everyday rhythm that matches the footfalls of this engaging heroine who loves to move, but who is willing to stop and smell the roses. Readers will enjoy meeting Annie, her family, and friends and will appreciate her resilience and spirit. This is vintage Creech, and its richness lies in its sheer simplicity.--Luann Toth, School Library Journal
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

Gr. 3-6. "I love to run / but I don't want to run / in a herd," avows 11-year-old Annie, the free-spirited, ruminative narrator of Creech's second novel in verse. Annie's nonconformist outlook has raised tensions with her running buddy, Max, who can't understand why Annie won't join him on the track team. In the meantime, Annie's mother is pregnant, which thrills Annie but brings her grandfather's failing health into painful focus. In the midst of these shifting relationships, a creative teacher's school assignment offers solace and, as in Love That Dog (2001), an opportunity for self-discovery: Annie must draw a single apple each day for 100 days. The symbolism of the apple seems belabored, and the story's gentle momentum will probably hook only the most thoughtful young readers. But like the apple Annie draws, this story is a lovingly crafted, miniature landscape, which will find its most passionate advocates among Creech's numerous adult fans. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Sharon Creech is the author of the Newbery Medal winner Walk Two Moons and the Newbery Honor Book The Wanderer. Her other work includes the novels Hate That Cat, The Castle Corona, Replay, Heartbeat, Granny Torrelli Makes Soup, Ruby Holler, Love That Dog, Bloomability, Absolutely Normal Chaos, Chasing Redbird, and Pleasing the Ghost, as well as three picture books: A Fine, Fine School; Fishing in the Air; and Who's That Baby? Ms. Creech and her husband live in upstate New York.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 68 customer reviews
My daughter of 11 year old loved it.
rpv
Sharon Creech writes this touching story in free verse poems.
Randie
I love reading books like that; they seem so real.
TeensReadToo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Madigan McGillicuddy on July 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
Wow. Amazing narrative poetry of a very self-aware young girl. Annie is a runner and an artist. Her mother is expecting a new baby, her grandfather has Alzheimer's and is slowly slipping away, and she spends a lot of time with her neighbor and competitive friend Max. The novel made charming use of footnotes and grammar. It's a poignant and beautifully told tale, with simplicity and heart. I wept. It was beautiful.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 9, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is an awesome book!! In the book the main character is a twelve year old girl named Annie and she loves to run. Her favorite thing to do is run barefoot through the park with her friend Max, and she does this every season, winter, spring, summer and fall. I agree with her statement in the book, "Thump-thump, thump-thump... knowing I could fly fly fly, but letting my feet... thump-thump, thump-thump... touch the earth." I love to run, just like Annie does, and I feel the same way when I run. I feel as though I can just pick my feet up off the ground and I could fly away from all my troubles.

I also liked the book because it was interesting. It described how Annie was dealing with having the same problems that most teenagers go through. She talked about school, friends, family and teachers that made her upset, confused or angry, just like what we go through. She found a way to deal with her problems..... by running. In the book she says that running makes her feel free and happy.

I also liked that, in the book, Annie had to draw 1 picture of an apple every day until she had 100 pictures. I think that that showed how things change everyday and there no way to control it. She finds that out in the book, that almost nothing ever stays the same.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 9, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Annie loves to run and draw. When her teacher assigns them to draw 100 pictures of the same apple, Annie begins to see things in different ways. Her grandfather's forgetfulness and the baby growing inside her mother are part of a rhythm, a heartbeat, that Annie begins to explore.
Simple writing underscores it's profound themes. Destined to become a classic.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By jjankaew on March 21, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Heading:Heartbeat

By:Sharon Creech

Reviewed by:J.Jankaew

Period:2

This story is mainly about a girl named Annie and her life. Annie's mother is pregnant. She has one brother already. Most of the time when she goes to school, the track teacher of her brother asks her if she wants to join the track team. She is fast but she says no. Her grandpa lives with her. Annie's brother will have a track meet soon, but he has no shoes to wear for the meet. So Annie earns money by mowing her neighbor's lawn. She uses that money to buy her brother new shoes so he can run. During her brother's track meet, Annie's mother goes to the hospital to give birth, and now Annie has a new baby brother.

The is one quote in this story that I hate. It says "And the next instant the baby is lying there on the blue sheet and the baby is lying there not moving". I dislike that part because they are saying that the baby is not breathing, and the baby might not make it.

There is a quote that I like. It says "Wahh, Wahh and there is the baby squirming and crying and breathing." That means that the baby is now alive, and everyone is happy, and now Annie has a brother. I would be happy too if I had a new born baby brother. Tears of joy from the whole family.

My favorite part of the story is when Annie buys her brother a pair of shoes from the money she made. Annie and her brother fight a lot, but she loves him so much to be able to use the money she earned to by him shoes, so he would be able to run in the track meet. I like that part because it is showing that she would probably do anything for him. Annie wanted to buy something else for herself, but she saw that her brother really wanted new shoes badly, so she bout it for him secretly. That would make me happy if someone did that for me.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Reader on May 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover
It is so rare to find a book told from the point of view of a 12 year old that anybody over 12 could bear to read! This book is a great book for reluctant readers- told in a loose poem form, it is highly readable, moves along quickly, and has a wonderful rhythm to it. It is wonderful for children whose life is in flux (which means just about all 10-13 year olds- a tough age for books, as they have outgrown a lot of the children's books but are not necessarily ready for young adult books). Lots of emotional issues flow through the book, but it is still a good choice for children who are uncomfortable with too much intensity in books, as the writing is light and nuanced and the issues are handled with care. However, as another reviewer noted, it is completely different from Walk Two Moons. In our house, that was a good thing, but if you have major WTM fans in your house you might want to look at the preview pages first.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Ekker on July 21, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Sharon Creech never fails to wring at at least a bit of emotion out of me and she did it again with the relationship between Annie and her failing grandpa. This is a simple story told in an interesting way and it deals with some pretty deep subject matter. I wasn't as moved by this book as I was by Creech's Love That Dog, which is written in the same prose, but this story is much more complex and less emotion based. It is a very good book. As a teacher I would recommend it to fifth or sixth grade girls.
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