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Heaven And Hell

April 25, 1980 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:53
30
2
5:34
30
3
4:26
30
4
6:59
30
5
4:07
30
6
4:45
30
7
4:25
30
8
5:51
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 25, 1980
  • Release Date: April 25, 1980
  • Label: Rhino/Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 1980 Warner Bros. Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 40:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001MCYZJC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (316 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,478 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is one of the best songs on the album.
J. Wesley Townsend
They are both great singers, and they both had great albums with Sabbath, but I don't think Ronnie ever really got the fan support that Ozzy did.
Johny Bottom
I think, I'm a very good judge of what's good and what's not, and this great SABBATH album is quite incredible.
M. A. Scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

115 of 117 people found the following review helpful By J. Wesley Townsend on July 13, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I have had this for about a year, and I cannot stress this enough: Heaven and Hell by Black Sabbath is very possibly the best rock album EVER. I cannot put into words how great this album is. Ronnie James Dio's powerful voice was not so much a replacement for Ozzy Osbourne, it was more of a transformation. This "new" Sabbath sounds NOTHING like the old Sabbath. The musical and lyrical themes are magical, mystical kinds of stuff.
The album kicks off with, in my opinion, the best Sabbath song in their entire career. "Neon Knights" also happens to be my all-time favorite rock song. Right from the start, you know that something has changed about the band. They start off with a hard-rocking groove, and then all of a sudden... Dio's amazing voice takes the music into another dimension! In terms of songwriting, this is one of the best songs in either Sabbath's or Dio's catalog. The climax of the song, though, is Iommi's guitar solo. I could listen to this guitar solo on repeat for the rest of my life. Feel it!
The second song, "Children of the Sea," is slower, and heavier. The main crawling criff is one of the best on the album, and Dio's vocal part is very melodic and beautiful. This is one of the best songs on the album.
"Lady Evil" is an uptempo rocker that makes you want to move! "There's a place just south of Witches' Valley..." This is also a highlight of the album. It has one of the best guitar solos on the record, as well.
"Heaven and Hell," for many people, is the climax of the album (and for good reason!). From the opening hard-driving riff, you know this song is going to be something special. The guitar pummels away with the rhythm section for a little while, then pulls back, leaving only the drums and a mid-paced, galloping bass line. Enter Dio!
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By David V. Stewart on March 5, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This is the greatest LP ever recorded. You don't have to believe me. Buy it and find out for yourself.

This is Black Sabbath's first album without Ozzy, and Dio's divine performance reveals all of the band's former front man's shortcomings. Dio has better tone, better range, and better lyrics, and is just much more powerful than anything the band released in the 70's, though most those albums stand on their own as heavy metal masterpieces.

Also improved are the guitar sound and the rhythm section. Iommi crunches out riffs that are more than heavy, more than fast, and more than perfect. Bill ward proves he can play straight 4/4 and do it incredibly well, and Geezer plays bass in a way that is unparalleled in rock.

Every song is great, the production is good, and the lyrics will suck you in. From the opening chords of "Neon Nights" to the last tear-jerking chorus and solo in "lonely is the word" Heaven and Hell will enthrall you. It is utter musical perfection and I have no doubt that it will never be equaled.

Heaven and Hell is proof that metal can be powerful, melodic, heavy, and meaningful all at the same time. It is not just for metal heads, but anyone who loves real music.

Again, utter musical perfection. The best album ever recorded.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Lunar Strain on September 13, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Ok, maybe not perfection, but dang close! Sabbath absolutely made the perfect choice by picking up ex-Rainbow vocalist Ronnie James Dio to fill Ozzy's shoes. Personally I find Dio to be a MUCH better singer than the now over-blown Ozzy.

I actually got into the Dio-Sabbath era backwards because at first I got into Dio's solo efforts. After loving his solo albums Holy Diver, The Last in Line, and Sacred Heart, I decided to go back and check out his efforts with Sabbath. Of course I heard and liked Sabbath of old but for some reason I never gave the Dio era Sabbath a whirl. All I can say is WOW!

The album definitely has the traditional Sabbath sound thanks to the guitar talents of Tony Iommi, but it also isn't exactly like their past releases either. For this we can thank Dio as like the vocalists to follow him, he was the main lyrical writer. Because he is the main lyrical writer it comes to be no surprise that a lot of these songs seem like they come straight from a Dio solo album. We even get an epic fantasy song called Children of a Sea about a society that lives under the ocean.

The album opener Neon Knights is one of Sabbath's best songs. It's a faster number with a great sing along course. Another faster song is the most excellent Die Young which features a simple yet monstrous riff by Iommi. The epic doomier title track is another one of Sabbath's best songs.

Everything is just grand about this album. The song-writing is mature and well structured and the production is crisp thanks to producer Martin Birch (who later went on to produce Iron Maiden). The songs are all catchy and the guitarmanship is aw-inspiring. The album may not be as groundbreaking as their debut or Paranoid, but it very well might be better.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Johny Bottom on October 16, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I'm writing this review of how this album felt when it was released in 1980 and what was going on at that time in the Sabbath world.
Many bands have inner turmoil which causes sub-par albums that fans don't expect or deserve. Case in point with Sabbath 'Technical Ecstasy' and 'Never Say Die' are probably the most forgetable albums in the old Sabbath catalog. Toni couldn't deal with Ozzy anymore and vice-versa. Geezer and Bill were having their own problems with alcohol and substances. It was a far cry from when Sabbath first started out, they just went downhill after 'Sabotage'.
When Ozzy left, every music magazine was announcing the end of Black Sabbath, history proved them wrong, but at the time no one could ever see Sabbath without Ozzy (or Ozzy without Sabbath for that matter). When Heaven and Hell came out I was wary, I had never heard of Ronnie James Dio, and when I found out he was an American, I just wasn't interested. Thankfully though I did get the album from a friend of mine and gave it a spin for the first time. From the opening notes of Neon Knights, I knew this album was not a mistake.
This album buried the mediocre efforts of the last couple years. 'Die Young' 'Lady Evil' and the seven minute opus title track blasted through my walls for weeks on end. I still couldn't see Dio singing the old stuff, but this album by itself was superb.
Now in the year 2000, I say this album stands up well. I love Sabbath, but have little regard for the on again off again Tony Martin era. Heaven and Hell is as great now as when I first spun it (yeah it was vinyl). MANY Sabbath fans still do not except anyone but Ozzy as the Sab's frontman, but I disagree. To me Dio seemed to fit in better with Sabbath than Ozzy did in some areas.
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