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  • Heaven & Earth (aka Ten to Chi to) [VHS] (1990)
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Heaven & Earth (aka Ten to Chi to) [VHS] (1990)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Takaaki Enoki, Masahiko Tsugawa, Atsuko Asano, Naomi Zaizen, Hironobu Nomura
  • Directors: Haruki Kadokawa
  • Writers: Haruki Kadokawa, Chôgorô Kaionji, Isao Yoshiwara, Toshio Kamata
  • Producers: Yasutada Uemura, Yutaka Okada
  • Format: Color, NTSC, Subtitled, Dolby, HiFi Sound
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Live Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: June 10, 1992
  • Run Time: 104 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6302390656
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #337,556 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 28 customer reviews
The cinematography and acting are excellent.
D. Riordan
Overall, I can say this movie is among the great samurai films, and any collector or someone with interest like me should not go without it!
Penpen1
The drama is naturally built up, and the scenes are, to me, stunningly beautiful.
Steven W. Johnson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By D. Riordan on April 18, 2005
Format: VHS Tape
While many compared this Samurai flick to the movies of Akira Kurosawa, I feel that this is an unfare comparison. It's like measuring every mafia movie made against the Godfather trilogy.

While the storytelling is some what disjointed at times and it is a bit liberal with historical accuracy, the scenery and battle scenes are well worth viewing in this epic. It will definitely help any viewer to have an actual knowledge of the real-life history behind the stories two main characters (Uesugi Kenshin, Takeda Shingen). These two great warlords armies met 7 times over 15 years at the same plain in Northern Japans Alps. It is a truly fascinating story typical of the era known as Sengoku Jidai, or the "Age of the Waring States" in Japan.

The cinematography and acting are excellent. The battle scenes however are the true gem in this film. I have not seen medieval battle scenes done as well as this in film with the one exception being Braveheart.

Of note: Much of this film was shot in Canada using several thousand college students as extras.

Besides folks, how many "epic" samurai films are there to begin with (dont even mention "Last Samurai" to me!!!) and how many of those ever make it to the US or are available with english subtitles. Trust me, if you like films about samurai history/battles (not just lone/wandering/angry/pissed off samurai)you will dig this flick. For REAL fans of this movie, you can now (after 14 years) find the DVD on EBAY for $5. Why so cheap? Its only in Japanese w/ Chinese subtitles. Oh well.

Want to see it on DVD w/ English subtitles? Then start emailing Lionsgate Films to get off their butts and get it done!!! Here are two emails for them to send your thoughts to:

general-inquiries@lgf.com
pwilkes@lgf.com

June 2006 update: a region free dvd w/ english subtitles can now be found here:
[...]
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
I have a copy of this movie recorded off TV, and while it is not completely accurate historically, it is a truly beautiful film. The battle scenes are outstanding, even if the plot is not overly complicated.
I just wish it was available on DVD. Isn't there some kind of Amazon option that lets one vote and indirectly tell the studio that it should be produced as a DVD? This movie is too good not to be in the best format available.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 16, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
I have watched this movie over and over since its release on video. I try to watch it at least once to twice a month. The direction and cinematography is "outstanding"! The images dance across the screen in a bright bold canvas. I have to this day never watched a film that, on such a grand scale (the large number of extras) has come close to comparing to this film. The story in and of itself has many levels, but the landscapes combined with the music. It just pulls you into the film. I suggest definetly watching this on at least a 27" or bigger, it's the only way you could get close enough to bringing in such huge scenes. -Also I'm not much on instrumental only music, but I've got to find the musical score for this film...Heaven & Earth, no other movie should be allowed to share its title.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By RB on May 19, 2007
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
'Heaven and Earth' is laudable for the fact that it brings a chapter of Japan's Sengoku Period to life. What I found disconcerting was the use of the environs of Canada to set this movie in. While the shots are gorgeous, you know well you are NOT looking at Japan. I know there is little space to film such an epic there. However, I also must submit that Kurosawa was able to convey such a world and he filmed [to my knowledge] almost exclusively in Japan.

The battles between Takeda Shingen and Uesugi Kenshin [Kagetora] truly are legendary. Some of the sub-plots are...fiction. As something of a student of Takeda Shingen, I have never come across a character such as the 'Lady Yae' shown in this film. Nor is there an account of 'Lady Usami Nami' in the history of Uesugi that I've read. I might have not seen the actual source if it is true, but I find it hard to believe that a devoted followers of Bishmonten [Uesugi] and Fudo [Takeda] would take up women for more than the obvious needs men have. The practice of 'male love' [a.k.a. 'shudo'] was far more common among the samurai of this period.

While Uesugi and Lady Nami's platonic relationship is better done, Takeda could have done better without the so-called Lady Yae in his retinue. Perhaps the director was attempting to balance Shingen's character. However, a Daimyo would have not been inclined to let such a woman into his ranks unless she had more than toy soldier-women to offer. There simply would have to be a solid, historical source for this to have been the case.

There are some truly striking scenes, but the final duel between Takeda and Uesugi is so false that it left me speechless.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Penpen1 on January 15, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
This is a somewhat difficult film to dissect. This indeed should be regarded as one of the great samurai films. I first saw this when I was 13 on Bravo Channel, and after 2 years of seeking it out, finally owned it on video.
This was the movie that got me my love for samurai movies. It is, however, bound to be tested against Kurosawa. Kurosawa's films, mined you this is coming from an historian, is based on the scrolls from the Japanese Warring Daimyo period; rivers of blood. You can notice, and this is most evident in his movie "Ran", almost literal rivers of blood flowing from the dead, almost to the point where it is disproportional for a human.
This is not sick delight behind the director, but a tribute to ancient Japanese art, and to reality if you think about it.
One thing you will also notice about Akira Kurosawa's films is the fact he avoids showing in depth melee scenes. Plenty of charges, barrages, arrow volleys, and men dying, but I can't remember too well people actually getting up close and clashing spears in "Ran" and "Kagemusha". That is where this movie has a strong point. You actually see combat. Granted this is where there is a check and balance between the two movies: "Ran" and "Kagemusha": Lots of blood, no combat
"Heaven and Earth": Lots of combat, no blood
Off of the direct comparison, this movie succeeds on many levels; it has great scenery (and I don't think the word "great" is giving this movie's scenery due justice), it has fantastic armor, and stunning, and I do mean, stunning and epic battle scenes.
Most people who have seen this film are fond of the musical score, and it does suit the film, but it's really a matter of musical taste.
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