Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.98
  • Save: $1.60 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Shipping, 100% Guarantee! •Slight cover wear & corner curling. •Otherwise clean, tight, unmarked & almost like new. •GO GREEN! Buy used!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Heaven is Not My Home: Learning to Live in God's Creation Paperback – December 19, 1999


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, December 19, 1999
$14.38
$6.99 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Frequently Bought Together

Heaven is Not My Home: Learning to Live in God's Creation + Sociological Lives and Ideas + Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets
Price for all three: $51.34

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson Publishers (December 19, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0849990408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0849990403
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,150,660 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Marshall is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute's Center for Religious Freedom, Washington, D.C. He is the award-winning author of more than twenty books and has spoken on religious freedom, international relations, and radical Islam before Congress and the U.S. State Department and in many other nations. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
1
See all 11 customer reviews
Throughout, he utilizes clear illustrations and helpful applications that make the biblical principles concrete.
Gregory Dunn
Either way, this world and this earth and this creation are to be avoided or endured until the time when we will be freed from all of it.
David T. Wayne
Because our minds have been darkened by sin, it is only in the light of God's Word that we can understand the creation as it is.
John T. Henry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 29, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book encapsulates and summarizes much of my own struggle with Western Christianity. If my faith is true, then why is it that it seems only to speak of what is beyond this life? Is there not meaning to life here? Is there not inherent value in work itself, or in art, or even in play?
This book is not only a strong challenge to commonly held Christian perspectives, it is wonderfully freeing. It means that I can find God in even the simplest and "menial" of tasks - not just those so-called higher things associated with church and "spiritual" life. It lays to rest the dualist heresy many evangelicals live.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By stephen@cpjustice.org Stephen Lazarus on February 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
If the Christian church can be called a sleeping giant, than this book is without a doubt its wake-up call.
Using very clear language, vivid description, and intriguing personal stories, this book drives home the point that Christians are called to be at home in God's world, and about the King's business, rather than always attempting to escape this world.
The impressive endorsements by notable figures such as evangelical theologian J.I. Packer ring true as one reads chapter after surprising and enjoyable chapter. This book will help the church discover a very old and orthodox truth: Christ frees us up to be fully human and radically engaged in realizing in the here and now his age-old purposes for his world. No, it will not all burn in the end as some milennium fear-mongers would have us believe. God has not fashioned the works of his hands to end in futility, but to be infused with meaning and purpose. Rather with Christ's return, our world--perfected with its redeemed and transformed people, animals, institutions, and ALL that God has made--will ineed blaze brilliantly with the glory of its Creator.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Dunn on April 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is one of the best introductions to Christian worldview thinking I have read and should prompt one to more robust reflection on the many ways one's commitment to Christ should form all of life. Marshall's treatment is thoroughly biblical, and he writes in an engaging style. He first explains the Reformed pattern of Creation-Fall-Redemption-Consummation and then explores its impact on our learning, our work, our rest, and our play, as well as its implications for how we think about the natural world, politics, the arts, and technology, among other topics. Throughout, he utilizes clear illustrations and helpful applications that make the biblical principles concrete. (For example, his discussion about how to think about the way we dress is alone worth the price of admission.) All told, Heaven Is Not My Home is an excellent catalyst for thinking Christianly about God's world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By David T. Wayne on August 4, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The author definitely chose a provocative title for this book. I hope that no one avoids it because of the title. If you read between the lines you can see that he is not denying the biblical doctrine of the eternal state. In fact, I thought that another way of titling the book could have been "Disembodied existence somewhere in an ethereal third dimension is not my destiny."
The view that many Christians have is that, after this life, our souls go to heaven and we walk streets of gold, wearing white robes and singing hymns for eternity. What Marshall does is show that our eternal destiny may in fact look a bit more like our current earthly existence than we realize.
Marshall correctly brings out the biblical teaching that the created order is basically good, and therefore it can be embraced. Sin is not the essence of the creation, sin is an imposter.
Because many Christians have wrongly interpreted Biblical passages on the world and worldliness we have adopted an attitude that sees this world as something evil at worst, or unnecessary at best. Either way, this world and this earth and this creation are to be avoided or endured until the time when we will be freed from all of it.
However, Marshall shows very well that sin is to be removed from the creation, the creation itself is not destined to perish. He demonstrates that this creation is destined for renewal, not eradication. Eternity will be spent in a new heavens and a new earth.
Such a view has implications for how we live now. Our work, our rest, our play, our culture, our politics, and all human activity has value. We are to embrace our earthly callings. He makes the comment that all honest work is pleasing to God. Paul tells us - wheter we eat or drink, do all to the glory of God.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey A Heidkamp on June 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is insightful, readable, enjoyable, and brilliant. I will recommend it to many friends. Marshall summarized many of my thoughts about modern Christianity, and challenged me to take the Kingdom call of God more seriously in my everyday life. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Eby on July 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Along with may of the other reviewers here I found this book to be interesting and thought provoking. Marshall tells a lot of stories and does a very good job of starting you down the path of applying the Christian worldview to areas that our culture does not traditionally apply it to. I do have a little problem (please don't let it stop you from reading the book) with his interpretation of 2nd Peter 3 that I think is worth mentioning. Marshall interprets this passage's description of the destruction of the world by fire as describing a refining fire which will burn away the bad and leave the good. While this is an interesting idea I don't think a straightforward reading of the passage supports this. Marshall then goes on to say that, "Our good buildings, our great inventions, our acts of healing, our best writings, our creative art, our finest clothes, our greatest treasures will not simply pass away. If they represent the finest works of God's image-bearers, they will adorn the world to come." This is a nice thought but it too depends on interpretations of various scripture passages which many evangelicals would disagree with. For me, "great treasures" which were created as an act of worship to God are intrinsically valuable and it doesn't matter if they don't make it to the New Earth that the Bible describes. I also agree with other reviewers who mentioned that Marshall should have addressed the Biblical teachings on "being in the world but not of the world" more thoroughly. In any case, I thought Marshall's insights far outweigh any problems I had. If you are interested in what Christianity has to say about the environment, art, play, technology, and more this book is a good place to start.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa3e51054)