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Heaven's Flame: A Guide to Solar Cookers Paperback – March 15, 1998


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Paperback, March 15, 1998
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 143 pages
  • Publisher: Home Power Publishing; 2 edition (March 15, 1998)
  • ISBN-10: 0962958824
  • ISBN-13: 978-0962958823
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,864,102 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Fantastic book with loads of info.
Janet Wehlitz
This is just one of the many unique innovations that he's contributed to solar box cooker design.
Maria Alovert
It tells how to make the cooker in great detail.
spike

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By spike on March 21, 2001
This is a book about the heavens flame solar cooker. It tells how to make the cooker in great detail. It also has a wealth of great information on many aspects of solar cooking such as the history of solar cooking, solar cooking tips, and ideas on how to make your own solar cooker design. I greatly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in cooking with the sun.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Maria Alovert on November 15, 2007
This is the best solar box cooker design you can build- there's no reason to build it out of cardboard (though you'll want to use cardboard as insulation like he recommends), and it can be made out of scrap plywood, to be quite long-lasting.

I've lived with this cooker for several years, and they will reach very high temperatures for a box cooker, at least compared to the one-reflector-panel designs that are also common. We've even managed to burn food in them before- not an easy feat for a box cooker (you won't burn stuff if you follow the standard directions, we were experimenting to see how hot we'd get it while making cookies).

some innovations:
-the cardboard design he promotes is very well-built and stands up to quite a long use, though you wouldn't want to leave it in the rain for very long.

-The reflector panel shapes (and reflector angle) that Radabaugh recommends help direct more sunlight into the box than square panels do, and also help stiffen the unit so that the panels are less likely to bend with time or abuse. This is just one of the many unique innovations that he's contributed to solar box cooker design.

-carboard is am amazing insulative material for this application. Best yet, it's free.

I wound up using mine mostly for long-cooking foods like beans, and I tend to heat up the water on the regular stove and then put the food/hot water into the solar oven to complete cooking. On a sunny day, or if I rotate the oven once to follow the sun on a marginal sun day, the beans then finish cooking in the same amount of time as stovetop cooking (and no, you can't burn them if cooked this way, unlike a stovetop pot).

If you're not used to cooking outside I'd recommend adding a digital timer or alarm inside your kitchen that reminds you that you've got something cooking out there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. P. Hendrix on September 9, 2013
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I was disappointed on the few pages of history, which I was counting on for a lecture, but impressed with the rest of it. Although it is dated, it contains a wealth of knowledge on solar cooking and the engineering aspect of building cookers and solar cooking kits. Too bad there isn't more interest. We Americans are so spoiled, solar cooking is just a hobby. It's a fun one, though and a great chance to get youngsters involved in a great solution to fuel shortage. Sunshine is still free, at least for now.
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