Heavy Horses

March 20, 2007 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:12
30
2
3:24
30
3
7:54
30
4
3:27
30
5
3:57
30
6
4:17
30
7
3:22
30
8
8:54
30
9
4:06
30
10
3:10
30
11
3:38


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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 27, 1994
  • Release Date: May 27, 1994
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 2003 Chrysalis Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2003 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 49:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000THCKHU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #34,834 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This song is one of the best on this CD.
Lonnie E. Holder
Both bonus tracks are excellent, and fit very well with the rest of the album, unlike other bonus tracks on previous remasters.
John Q. Rowland
The mix of rock and folk music on this album is remarkable.
Hornell Fred

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

106 of 108 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Kimsey on June 1, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Hmm...who would have thought it? So many people slapping around one of the truly great rock albums of all time, and yet I still have the heart to listen. Actually, Jethro Tull's critical nadir was reached during A Passion Play (one of their greatest works, by the way), so I guess I can scratch off that criticism of Heavy Horses. Rolling Stone, a most anti-Tull publication, gave HH a great review. Mojo also included it among the top-ten greatest folk albums of all time.
Oh, and being a Tull fan, you can probably guess that I'm not too concerned with the top ten. Actually, considering that bands like Boston and Fleetwood Mac were at their commercial peaks during this era, I consider Heavy Horses NOT reaching the top ten to be a ringing endorsement! As far as any perceived artistic fall is concerned, that is a purely subjective call. I believe that the Songs From The Wood-to-A era to be this band's greatest.
To call these songs "verbose" and "banal" betrays the taste of the person who uttered these comments. Apparently, this person dislikes artfully crafted lyrics (an utterly rare phenomenon in rock music), or this person believes that rock music should forever confine itself to boy-meets-girl cliches or emerging male sexuality.
Actually, I must admit that I found the accusation of HH being "pseudo-literary" to be hilarious. To attack admirers of Heavy Horses as "puerile" is quite harsh, but one is entitled to his or her opinion. But the analysis of the "Acres Wild" lyrics is incredibly pedantic. Anyone who bases their appreciation of poetry or prose on the literary bean-counting of an English comp class will probably end up teaching it. Have you ever read Langston Hughs or Robert Burns?
Some have remarked about Ian Anderson's growl.
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62 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Brooks Smith on May 20, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This album was the one that made me realize, when I was twelve, that I would be spending a lot of money completing my Jethro Tull collection. After War Child got my attention and Benefit bewitched me, Heavy Horses drove home the undeniable fact that this band was a force to be reckoned with.
I have been looking forward to the remaster, for the drum mix and the warmth and presence of the acoustic guitars made this one of the most well-recorded and realized albums of the Seventies. Tull hit upon an exact sound for this album that perfectly suits Ian's earthy songwriting here. And the songs are fantastic.
To those reviewers who think they know a little about music because they learned the word "diatonic," and the term "key changes" - remember that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. A good understanding of harmonic vocabulary and, above all, an appreciation of form, reveal the hidden power of every song on this masterful work.
The lyrics are among the best Ian has had to offer - like good poetry, the songs are full of concrete images, and not just visual imagery, but snapshots that can convincingly put you in the moment. Mind you, the experiences conveyed in this album are from real life, not the kind of overblown fantasy world pretention that some may expect from "progressive rock," but they certainly are not "banal," just non-pretentious.
If you "avoid this recording," the loss is entirely yours. You and this album deserve a fresh opinion, so don't miss out because you read someone's unfortunately off-base review. Listen to it yourself - and remember that, as with all great songwriting, its strengths reveal themselves gradually, with repetition. This is no instant-gratification album, but those who give it the depth of listenings that it deserves will reap very satisfying results.
Great stuff!
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 25, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This is my all time favorite Jethro Tull album. Every song on this album, from "the mouse police never sleeps" to the incredible title track, is spectacular. The lyrics are excellent, the tunes catchy, the vocals good, and all of the instrumentals display incredible virtuosity. If you are a fan of Jethro Tull you owe it to yourself to get this CD. Any fan of folk rock, good guitar, drums, or flute should also consider this purchase.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John S. Ryan on July 27, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I lost my vinyl version of this one a long time ago -- glad to see I can replace it on CD. This is one of Tull's most underrated releases; it followed the all-but-unfollowable _Songs From The Wood_ and just never had the impact its predecessor had.

Too bad. There's great stuff on here.

The title track is some of the band's best musicianship ever -- John Glascock's bass actually _sounds_ like the clomp of horses' hooves and the thunder of the gathering storm. (By the way, this album was Glascock's last recording with the band before his untimely death. He's always been my favorite among their bassists.)

There's also "One Brown Mouse," an old favorite of mine -- Ian Anderson sounds great, growling along and harmonizing with himself in fifths.

And there's "Weathercock" -- featuring Anderson's soaring flutes over a thumping backbeat in what may be _the_ quintessential Jethro Tull instrumental break.

I could go on, but enough from me. I'm going to order this CD as soon as possible, and any Tull fans who don't already have it should probably do likewise. This is some of their best work.
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